Would you recommend your employer?

How likely would you be to recommend your employer to another job-seeker?

Join us for the second in our Vanquis Bank ‘Professional Gripes Survey’ posts. You can catch up on the first installment here – exploring how many professionals would accept a promotion that didn’t come with a pay rise.

Today, we take a look at the likelihood of suggesting your employers to other job-seekers. Vanquis cites that the average British person changes companies every five years and they’re eager to know more about why this is. Could it be that professionals are harbouring negative feelings about their workplace or the people working there?

There’s some good news for employers…

  • It turns out that 3/4 of respondents would recommend their workplace to another person.
  • Those in the Beauty and Wellbeing sector appear most satisfied, with 90% of people happy to make a recommendation.
  • Hospitality employees appear the least satisfied, as 35.2% say they would not recommend their company to others.
  • Transport & Distribution and Retail & Customer Services professionals also fall into the least likely groups (with 33.1% and 32.1% unhappy to recommend).

Why wouldn’t you recommend your employer?

Turning to the 1/4 of respondents who would avoid a recommendation, there are a variety of commonly held reasons. In fact, all but one of the reasons are shared by at least 30% of this group. These include:

  1. Feeling undervalued (46%)
  2. Believing you’re underpaid (44%)
  3. Perceived lack of progression (38%)
  4. Disliking your management team (37%)
  5. Feeling over-worked (35%)
  6. Disliking your work environment (30%)
  7. And not liking your colleagues (14%)

Why this matters…

  • For employers: each employee’s experience naturally contributes towards a company’s wider reputation. Negative comments shared with family and friends can soon spread much further afield and impact the chance to recruit quality personnel. Of course, it’s unlikely that every employee who works for a company will have a positive experience as there are so many factors involved. However, you can take control of certain elements, including many of the above.
  • For employees: it’s always helpful to consider these sorts of questions. What’s stopping you from feeling able to recommend your employer…and are they even the right employer for you? As ever, the more you understand what’s not working for you, the easier it is to identify what could.

Want to know what other local opportunities are out there? Visit our jobs page



Choosing company culture over salary

Which is more important, your company culture or your salary? Why the former may mean more to job satisfaction…

Employers may think a competitive salary is all that’s needed to attract and retain talented team members. Yet, while salaries are clearly important, this way of thinking can be risky in times of skills shortage.

After all, the latest findings indicate that:

  • 57% of people believe their company culture has more of an effect on their job satisfaction than their salary level.
  • 75% would ‘consider’ an employer’s culture before even making a job application.
  • 63% think it’s one of the primary reasons they remain in their role.
  • And 70% of employees would start looking for a new job if their working culture ‘deteriorated’.
  • In addition, respondents favour businesses that represent a ‘clear mission and purpose’ (89%).

It’s not the first time we’ve read such stats. Back in the Spring, it was reported that employees would sacrifice their work-life balance in order to enjoy a positive environment.

Respondents even say they’d choose to work a 60-hour week rather than be a part of a business that ‘doesn’t value culture’.

What contributes to a positive company culture?

Business leaders will want to read this HR News post in full. In summary, there are many elements that contribute to a strong working culture. These include…

  • Respecting – and being fair to – the team
  • Displaying ‘trust and integrity’
  • A culture of teamwork
  • Being flexible/open to improvements
  • Using ‘pre-boarding’ strategies, such as workplace buddies and mentoring for soon-to-be employees
  • Providing continued support/guidance
  • Offering recognition and incentives
  • Flexible working opportunities
  • And strong working relationships (including those with management)

Recognition is also prioritised ahead of pay rises…

Once again, the above list calls to mind another research report.

  • More than 3/5 of employees would rather work for a company that expresses praise and thanks than to be paid 10% more without it.
  • Yet there’s a clear gap between hope and reality, as only 16% of managers think they’ve been given the tools and know-how to ‘recognise colleagues effectively’.

How do you learn more about an employer’s company culture?

Naturally, it can be hard to truly understand a business’s working culture until you’re actively a part of it. Yet there are some great clues to help you decide whether it’s the sort of place that you’d like to work…

  1. Have a really good look at the company’s website. This sounds obvious, but you’d be amazed at how many people just have a quick glance at the ‘about’ page. Take the time to really read what the business is highlighting about itself and its team.
  2. As well as reading the business’s latest news via their website and social feeds, see what others are saying about them. How do their employees talk about their work on Twitter, etc? Has anyone reviewed their experience of working for the company? The latter tends to be more common for larger regional/national employers. Of course, reviews can be subjective yet they can be helpful if you read them with a critical mind.
  3. Job advertisements can also provide some useful insights. Especially if there are mentions of team outings, company events, employee benefits, charity initiatives, etc.
  4. Search for the business in the actual news – whether local, national or industry publications.
  5. Use interviews as a chance to find out more about the working culture and environment.
  6. And, of course, don’t forget to ask your recruitment consultant for their insights. This is just one of the many benefits of working with an agency who specialises in your field.

Ready to discover a new company culture? Here are the latest jobs