Would you recommend your employer?

How likely would you be to recommend your employer to another job-seeker?

Join us for the second in our Vanquis Bank ‘Professional Gripes Survey’ posts. You can catch up on the first installment here – exploring how many professionals would accept a promotion that didn’t come with a pay rise.

Today, we take a look at the likelihood of suggesting your employers to other job-seekers. Vanquis cites that the average British person changes companies every five years and they’re eager to know more about why this is. Could it be that professionals are harbouring negative feelings about their workplace or the people working there?

There’s some good news for employers…

  • It turns out that 3/4 of respondents would recommend their workplace to another person.
  • Those in the Beauty and Wellbeing sector appear most satisfied, with 90% of people happy to make a recommendation.
  • Hospitality employees appear the least satisfied, as 35.2% say they would not recommend their company to others.
  • Transport & Distribution and Retail & Customer Services professionals also fall into the least likely groups (with 33.1% and 32.1% unhappy to recommend).

Why wouldn’t you recommend your employer?

Turning to the 1/4 of respondents who would avoid a recommendation, there are a variety of commonly held reasons. In fact, all but one of the reasons are shared by at least 30% of this group. These include:

  1. Feeling undervalued (46%)
  2. Believing you’re underpaid (44%)
  3. Perceived lack of progression (38%)
  4. Disliking your management team (37%)
  5. Feeling over-worked (35%)
  6. Disliking your work environment (30%)
  7. And not liking your colleagues (14%)

Why this matters…

  • For employers: each employee’s experience naturally contributes towards a company’s wider reputation. Negative comments shared with family and friends can soon spread much further afield and impact the chance to recruit quality personnel. Of course, it’s unlikely that every employee who works for a company will have a positive experience as there are so many factors involved. However, you can take control of certain elements, including many of the above.
  • For employees: it’s always helpful to consider these sorts of questions. What’s stopping you from feeling able to recommend your employer…and are they even the right employer for you? As ever, the more you understand what’s not working for you, the easier it is to identify what could.

Want to know what other local opportunities are out there? Visit our jobs page



Job Search September! Is everyone looking for a new job?

Will this new season also spell the start of a new job frenzy throughout the nation? Some of the latest findings suggest so…

Wix (the web development platform) has conducted its own research among professionals. They’ve found that:

  • 49% of British professionals intend to leave their job on return from their summer holiday.
  • September is one of the most popular times to change jobs, next to January.
  • A number of workers are deliberately missing return flights and hiding their holiday social media updates so their employers won’t see!
  • There is also data regarding the desire to set up new businesses, the industries people want to specialise in and the type of breaks that inspire a new job search!

Why are professionals feeling so fed up?

  • 69% of respondents experience a sense of ‘dread’ about returning to the office.
  • 42% of people crave more flexibility in their working lives.
  • 39% state that they feel ‘undervalued’.
  • In addition, 37% believe they’re underpaid for their role.
  • 34% say they either don’t like their boss or colleagues.
  • And 31% cite poor management at work.

Will we really experience a Job Search September?

It’s unlikely that the whole study pool will hand in their notice this month! While holidays often spark a period of reflection, many people won’t follow through on their ideas on return from their break.

That said, some of the group will, and the fact remains that this is a popular time to make a change. Other findings reflect some of the above sentiment, yet less dramatically(/imminently)!

For instance, a separate study suggests that just under 1/3 of office employees are ‘considering’ finding a new job within the next year.

Many of the triggers are the same…

  • 39% hope to achieve a better work-life balance, with 32% specifically wanting flexible working options.
  • 38% are looking for a pay rise.
  • This group also believe that their skills will be ‘more desirable in the coming months’ (32%) – and that they’ll still receive ‘multiple job offers with competitive salaries’ (33%).
  • The youngest age group (comprising 16 to 24-year-olds) appears most likely to search for a new role, with career progression and work-life balance the greatest incentives for this demographic. They also prioritise corporate culture over pay rates.
  • Employees aged 35 and over are 10% less likely to job search, yet place an increased value on salaries (42% versus 17% for 16 to 24-year-olds). This is unsurprising if you consider career stage and life factors, including average household and/or caring responsibilities.

Both articles mention the need for employers to prepare themselves for a period of change. Alongside exploring staff retention strategies, this may naturally include an increased recruitment focus.

Please call the office on 01225 313130 to discuss your recruitment requirements or email the team directly. Job-seekers can apply for the latest openings via the jobs page, CV upload, or by email. Here’s what to include in your cover email if you’re looking for a new job!



Perks & pay: for employees earning less than £30K.

What’s more important, perks or pay for employees earning less than £30,000 a year? 

If you keep your eye on the jobs news, you’ll spot a common theme. Researchers always want to know more about your working values and how these compare to each other. The perennial question tends to include ‘what matters more to you, your salary or your…!’ (As a case in point, we recently reported on the topic of company culture versus salary level.)

Today’s source specifically explores the parity of the work benefits package and salary for the ‘under £30,000 workforce’.

Perks or pay?

In this instance, the title suggests that they’re ‘just as important’ as each other – and many of the employees surveyed place more weight on other work-life benefits.

  • 45% of respondents are happier when offered learning and development opportunities
  • 36% value flexible working hours, including ‘leniency in start times and/or breaks’
  • 26% already enjoy non-typical work schedules
  • ‘Frequency of pay’ is briefly mentioned as an additional motivator
  • Candidates are also eager to source jobs local to home (27%)

The income issue:

This sample explores the ‘Hidden Heroes’ workforce: those who earn an average salary of £16,403. This comprises employees in multiple sectors and across a variety of working ages.

So, from the above findings, you may think this group just isn’t as reliant on their income. However, many of the respondents express financial concerns.

  • Over 1/3 are ‘unsure or worried’ about covering their general bills
  • While 72% do not think they’d be able to fund ‘a large unexpected’ payment
  • Alongside this, 54% of this employee group report feeling ‘underpaid’
  • Millennials most often relate to feeling ‘overqualified’ (45%) for their roles
  • And the hospitality and catering industries contain the greatest number of workers who feel overqualified (54%)

What this tells us…

Employers looking to attract candidates for openings of this salary level would be smart to explore their wider benefits packages. What else could be offered to motivate and incentivise employees? Small changes could prove invaluable to professionals.

Naturally, extending benefit schemes across the entire workforce helps companies to maintain a competitive advantage.

For further recruitment advice, please call the office on 01225 313130.