Employers intend to invest in their teams

Two separate surveys highlight employers’ plans to invest in their teams; regardless of their economic expectations…

Survey 1: employers set to invest in new employees

Source: REC

Our first survey actually comes from our accrediting body, the REC. Confidence in the UK economy appears ‘negative’ for its fourth consecutive month. In figure terms, this equates to a survey score of -14.

However, despite this, hiring and investment plans remain positive and have even increased by a percentage point over the past month. Taking this particular score to +16.

  • 48% of businesses looking to hire permanent employees are worried that there will not be enough candidates available (+6%).
  • Likewise, 53% of those hoping to grow their temporary headcount are concerned about sourcing enough skilled staff.
  • The marketing, media and creative sectors are among the most affected by the skills shortage.
  • Overall, the number of companies planning to recruit agency staff within a short-term time frame has increased by 3% since October (to a total score of +19).

Neil Carberry of the REC suggests Brits are displaying their ‘pragmatic best’ in spite of their wider economic concerns – and are set to ‘invest in their own businesses to meet demand’.

These attitudes clearly reflect those of other sources, as recently discussed.

Survey 2: employers will continue to invest in staff benefits

Source: The CIPD via People Management

Looking to the next two years, most businesses (97%) additionally intend to either maintain or increase their employee benefits schemes.

  • 81% plan to spend the same amount.
  • 16% intend to increase their spend in this area.
  • Businesses predominantly wish to focus on professional development benefits (43%), including mentoring and secondments.
  • This is followed by health and wellbeing incentives, such as sick pay (29%).
  • 25% will mainly focus on financial schemes, including pensions and debt-related advice.

Once again, these figures are deemed promising when considering external economic factors.

Charles Cotton from the REC praises businesses for their efforts. He says ‘spending in these areas can help improve employee performance, and ultimately corporate performance.’

The two news items are extremely closely related, with benefits packages also providing valuable staff attraction tools.

Benefits also appeared in our last post, as we explored which Christmas gifts employees most hope to receive.

Looking to recruit permanent or temporary staff? Call the office on 01225 313130. Candidates can apply for new jobs via the website, or upload a CV as a general applicant



Most-wanted staff Christmas gifts

Only 39% of full-time employees receive Christmas gifts or rewards from their employers each year. This is according to a new survey conducted by Motivates; as reported by HR News.

Those that never receive rewards formed the largest respondent group (50%). While 11% of people ‘sometimes’ get them.

With less than a month to go until Christmas, managers and employers may start to ponder the available budgets for festive rewards and activities. For anyone wondering, these are currently the…

…5 most-wanted staff Christmas gifts!

  1. An individual cash bonus (64%)
  2. Personal gift vouchers (52%)
  3. Team cash bonuses (42%)
  4. A company-paid team meal or social night (34%)
  5. The manager’s verbal thanks (25%)

Items voted 6-10 can also be found here. As for the percentages stated, each respondent could select as many items as they wished from the rewards list.

73% of employees would prefer a choice of gift, if possible. This could be an interesting way to amplify the buzz of the rewards and invite your team to be a part of the celebratory process.

What to do when there’s not enough budget for staff Christmas gifts:

Several items on the list don’t cost a penny, as per item 5 above. It’s possible to make these rewards even more personal. For instance, speaking to team members individually and taking the time to thank them for specific aspects of their work.

There are also plenty of ideas to be gathered from the realistic staff rewards post – featuring the most sought-after non-monetary gestures. Companies could increase flexible working opportunities or provide additional half days/early finishes for staff to do their Christmas shopping. Even providing an office picnic lunch can make for a lovely affordable gesture.

Employees could also organise their own Secret Santa celebrations, festive bake-offs and post-work drinks to add a spot of festive cheer. Managers would be wise to encourage this; especially if their teams fall into the 50% of workers who won’t receive Christmas gifts.

Longing for some extra hands to make everything happen this Christmas?

Hiring one or more Christmas temps can prove to be a gift for busy bosses! Whether it’s helping with the season’s admin, covering the phone for your festive events, or offering some additional skills for a special project.

Call the office on 01225 313130 to discuss your Christmas temp needs.



Training as an incentive

Why we all need to see training as an incentive at work…

Currently, HR Review reports that only 25% of HR professionals believe their employers provide a ‘learning culture’ for their staff. The remaining three quarters say:

  • They’re still working towards creating a learning environment (59%:).
  • Such a culture is completely absent (11%).
  • This isn’t considered a business priority (5%).

Yet these businesses may want to rethink things. After all…

Employees see training as an incentive to stay in their roles!

In fact, in an HR News post, we hear that 90% of UK employees consider training as ‘vital to furthering their career’.

  • 42% go as far as to say they ‘strongly agree’ with its importance.
  • 95% of respondents aged 55 and over deem this to be ‘crucial’.
  • Alongside this, 86% of people think that continued training will reduce staff turnover levels.

Time is the main barrier for team members choosing whether or not to attend a course. Many employees express worry about having to be away from their desks for too long.

Which takes us onto the question of training strategies…

It seems that out of those who actually offer staff training, many businesses are predominantly focusing their attention on:

  • Trainee level programmes (38%).
  • Coaching style training (35%).

Conversely, the following training types are considered to be ‘low priority’:

  • Online training courses (32%).
  • Onboarding initiatives (27%).
  • ‘Knowledge sharing’ (29%).

But are these businesses making a mistake? The article would suggest so. Referencing the continued focus on the ‘skills economy’ (and the fact 2/3 of employees have resigned due to the absence of training opportunities!), it calls for companies to prioritise ‘modern training practices’.

It’s not only the digital courses that are promoted within this, yet also the need to encourage knowledge sharing so that vital information isn’t lost when employees move on to other roles.

You may also see training as an incentive to attract new staff members in the first place. We can help you shout about the learning and development benefits offered to employees. For further support, please call the office on 01225 313130.

Related reading:



Generation Z makes the recruitment news…

Generation Z has made it into the recruitment and HR news no less than 3 times within a week. And these are only the articles that we’ve spotted. So why are they hitting the headlines right now?

Who is Generation Z?

Millennials, Baby Boomers, and now Generation Z. It can all get somewhat confusing! While specific birth date ranges can vary by source, ‘Generation Z’ (also known as ‘Gen Z’ or ‘post-millennials’) refers to those born somewhere between the mid-90s and early-2000s.

Now let’s look at the news stories in question…

1. The workplace benefits Gen Z is hoping for!

Source: HR News

This first post discusses research conducted by Perkbox, which finds some significant group differences…

  • Over 1/3 of Generation Z consider staff benefits to be ‘one of the most important deciding factors’ when it comes to their career decisions. Possibly making all the difference in whether or not to accept a job offer.
  • They are the most likely to prefer small, frequent, year-round perks in lieu of one large annual offering. Again, this accounts for more than 1/3 of those surveyed.

Simple employee benefits prove most desirable, including: 

  • 86%: enjoying birthdays as annual leave
  • 85%: a ready supply of free hot drinks
  • 83%: flexible working hours (do you remember, this was also the top-rated benefit for Millennials?)

2. How SMEs can attract Generation Z talent

Source: HR Review

Employers are encouraged to use this time to attract the best post-millennial talent or ‘risk missing out’. After all, over 1/3 of this generation intends to commence a new job role or career path within the year.

Additionally, it’s this very month that is singled out as the time that many of the latest graduates will use to start their search.

There are 3 core categories discussed as attraction and retention tools:

  1. Money saving tips: this isn’t something we’ve seen discussed anywhere else in recruitment and HR news, so we read it with interest. The feature explores how Gen Z has been faced with a unique set of financial circumstances, which have created an increasingly budget-conscious generation. To this end, SMEs are encouraged to find ways to promote money-saving offerings such as employee discounts or schemes. They additionally explore the idea of helping new and existing colleagues stay financially aware through reminders, such as using the benefits on offer, as they get closer to Christmas.
  2. Tapping into tech: this generation is incredibly tech-savvy and will connect well with ‘clear and punchy online portals’ as well as mobile-optimised platforms. The idea of motivational staff contests around active wearables (possibly even combined with a rewards scheme) is also discussed.
  3. Health-aware. Gen Z is considered a health-conscious group, with a deeper interest in the foods they consume than ever before. SMEs are encouraged to appeal to these interests by arranging expert speakers on nutrition and wellness, creating company sports days, and even offering workplace health checks. Mental health offerings should also be considered.

3. Generation Z may be missing out…

Source: HR News

In our third and final Gen Z piece, we return to HR News. This article also refers to Millennials, with new data suggesting…

  • 1/3 of these groups wish to work for an SME.
  • Only 18% hope to join a micro-business.
  • Currently, over 1/2 of these groups plan to join a large business or the public sector, with just under 1/2 hoping to work for a ‘global multinational’.

This contradicts previous research on Millennials, raising the question: is Generation Z accounting for a large proportion of these findings, or have perceptions shifted among Millennials?

Why are younger people wanting to work for big businesses?

  • 56% believe SMEs offer reduced job security.
  • 46% perceive they will receive a lower salary level from a smaller business.
  • 33% expect fewer career progression opportunities within SMEs.

And how might Generation Z and the Millennials actually miss out?

As the article states, the greatest majority of UK businesses are in fact SMEs. This is also reflected by the strength of our local business community. What’s more, 70% of UK SMEs are actively searching for new employees to fill ‘entry-level roles’.

All in all, these news items make for thought-provoking reading. We’d be fascinated to hear the insights of Generation Z employees and job-seekers themselves. Do you feel this data applies to you? Let us know via TwitterFacebook and LinkedIn!



Only for the money?

Do you only go to work for the money? UK workers are more motivated by pay rates than any other European country surveyed. What does this tell us about our culture of work; how could this affect your search for the perfect job or employee?

For the money: the research reveals…

  • For 62% of UK employees, pay is the primary driver to work.
  • This is the highest rate in Europe, where the average is just 49%.
  • UK workers are also the least likely to say they work because ‘they love what they do.’ (Accounting for 13%. This is half the number of respondents that proclaimed this in the Netherlands).
  • Additionally, UK employees remain the most likely to ‘feel like quitting’ their job, with almost 10% of those surveyed considering this ‘most days!’

What does this tell us about the UK work culture?

According to today’s source, HR Magazine, these stats reflect a low level of national employee engagement. Those most motivated by non-financial rewards consistently revealed greater ongoing engagement and job satisfaction.

Conversely, those driven to work for the ability to cover the costs of those things they want/need are actually likelier to experience frustration or disappointment on receipt of their pay.

There are some really interesting comments in the HR Magazine piece. It certainly provides food for thought, whether you’re a job-seeker or employer…

1) How this might affect your job search

If you truly want to find job satisfaction, it might be time to think beyond the money mindset. This is by no means to suggest you work for less than you deserve. Rather, you can really consider the ‘full package’ of a role.

What would it take for you to wake up and actually look forward to a Monday? What would inspire you to say ‘I love what I do’ and to get through a working week without considering moving on?!

This is such an individual consideration. It might include…

  • Entering a certain industry
  • Progressing to or taking on a particular role
  • Achieving your ideal work-life balance
  • Working with like-minded people
  • Being a part of a particular work culture/environment
  • Contributing to a greater purpose or joining a company with a shared ethos
  • Even just joining a business of a particular size or working closer to home

Naturally, these are just thinking points. You need to work out what really matters to you. Consider these factors as you peruse the latest vacancies and chat with your recruitment consultant.

To begin your job search, check out our current jobs listings and/or register your CV. We also have some excellent job hunting tips here.

2) How this might affect your search for a new employee

The savviest businesses can benefit from these insights. Firstly, understanding how many UK employees work for the money alone is an excellent driver to ensure you have a competitive salary offering. Perhaps you may also consider other financial incentives such as reward/bonus schemes.

However, you also want to be thinking beyond the money mindset! How can you communicate the additional benefits of working for your business?

Is there additional groundwork to do to ensure your team is actually on-board with a shared mission, that you have an enjoyable working environment, and that you demonstrate how much you value your staff?

Do you ask your team for (anonymous!) feedback on why they choose to work, what their experience of your company is, and what else would improve their workplace engagement, job satisfaction and similar?

Further reading:

For expert advice on attracting and recruiting the right team members for your needs, please call the office on 01225 313130.



Staff rewards: realistic ways to show thanks

You may remember that an increased focus on staff rewards appeared in our 2018 recruitment predictions – and it’s made the national news multiple times since!

We’ve already discussed how important it is for businesses to promote their work perk offering. The UK skills shortage certainly makes it all the more vital for employers to hone their staff attraction strategies.

In addition, we’ve compared the most sought-after (non-monetary!) benefits against those that employees are currently receiving.

Realistic staff rewards…

Well, today we’ll consider a number of realistic employee benefits that businesses might be overlooking. The rewards in question come from an HR Review article, featuring LondonOffices.com.

1) Increased annual leave

The article references the growing trend towards unlimited holiday offerings. (When we say growing, HR News recently reported on this and state that 9% of global businesses are using such an incentive. So, it’s right at the emerging sense of the word).

However, as they suggest, few SMEs will feel able to factor this into their benefits package. Yet they are far more likely to be able to offer an additional day or two of leave. Whether that’s as thanks for another year’s service, a well done for hitting a particular target, or appreciation of efforts made.

Let’s not forget that this perk also came number one on the most desired of all non-monetary benefits.

2) Healthcare packages

Private healthcare is a reassuring bonus for single workers and those with families alike. It is also said to benefit businesses, by helping to minimise absenteeism.

3) Fitness incentives

Our city’s offices aren’t all set up for on-site gyms (however lovely they may sound!), yet budgets can often extend to a monthly gym membership or similar. CIPHR has an excellent article on why this is so worthwhile for employers.

4) Free food!

This suggestion often crops up in the news, as we all appreciate the easy availability of some fresh food and drinks on a busy working day. There are a variety of companies that offer fresh fruit and snack boxes throughout the area… Google ‘Office fruit bowls Bath’ and you’ll soon see!

5) Flexible working opportunities

When we said increased annual leave came top of the work perk wish-list, the number one spot was also shared by sabbaticals and flexible working hours.

This is an element that is widely considered to enhance staff attraction and retention while increasing employee happiness.

6) Home working opportunities

The HR Review piece suggests this can help ‘break the monotony of the working week and increase levels of productivity‘. It can be healthy to get a change of scenery from time to time. Plus, this is about as realistic as staff rewards come, as it shouldn’t cost the company anything if work is still being completed.

7) Letting the weekend start early

Research suggests Friday afternoons are the least productive time of the working week, so it’s surely the best day to allow employees to finish work an hour or so sooner. If this wouldn’t work for all staff on a weekly basis, you could experiment with a fortnightly or monthly incentive. Or perhaps a rota for early finishes in micro businesses.

8) Team outings

Featured suggestions include regular staff drinks or meals or even trips further afield. Simply offering employees the chance to let their hair down and interact outside of the standard business setting.

9) Staff training 

We know ongoing training is imperative for the success of businesses as we look to the future world of work. Offering individual training budgets is also an excellent way to show appreciation for your staff – and express a continued interest in their personal development and future with your company. Tailoring training to individual needs takes this a big step further.



Report: 10 years of changing workplace trends

How workplace trends have changed, according to the findings of a 10-year study…

The purpose of this study is to explore how ‘Alternative Workplaces’ have influenced and impacted today’s businesses.

About ‘Alternative Workplaces’:

  • This label applies to any “non-traditional work practices, settings and locations that supplement or replace traditional offices.” For instance, the flexible working, remote working and shared office spaces that we’re all now familiar with.
  • This research commenced in 2008 when Alternative Workplaces (‘AW’) really were alternative.
  • The 2018 report marks the fifth biennial study of its type.
  • These latest findings come from 130 companies, employing in the region of 2.3 million employees worldwide.

Key workplace trends:

The primary motivations for implementing AW have changed dramatically over the past 10 years.

  • In 2011, soon after the recession, Cost Savings came joint top of the list alongside Business Agility (72% each). Cost Savings then plummeted by 34%, yet returned to second place in the latest survey (63%).
  • Employee Productivity is now in first place (64%).
  • The authors recognise that the core drivers tend to reflect the economic picture. In other words, today’s focus on staff depicts an improved economy and employment market.

Yet drivers also vary by the formality of the arrangement.

  • Businesses with formal AW programmes are vastly more likely to value Cost Savings (first place/76% versus 9th place/28% for informal programmes).
  • Also in the top five, businesses with formal programmes state that collaboration, attraction/retention, health/well-being and productivity are their most important motivations.
  • Conversely, productivity comes in first place for 86% of Informal AW programmes. This is followed by work-life balance, attraction/retention, agility, and health/wellbeing.
  • This reflects the tailoring of aims towards business goals as programmes mature and develop.

Internal mobility is on the increase!

  • The practice of ‘internal mobility’, where employees don’t have a designated seat yet rather work in and around a set building, has increased by 10% in four years, taking this up to 1 in 5 businesses.
  • External mobility (where the person doesn’t have a designated seat and also works on the road or spends 1-2 days each week working from home/client offices/satellite offices) has, however, reduced by almost the same amount in this period.
  • The number of people working from home 3 or more days a week has also reduced, although by just 3% (to a total of 6%).
  • Almost half of all employees still have their own designated workspace (48%).
  • It is suggested that businesses are making their workplaces more appealing. And, as the authors say, ‘people are happy to be mobile but they still want a place to call home.’

Employees may not be involved as much as they should be.

  • Respondents were asked how their employees were incorporated into planning, implementing and evaluating AW programmes. The results were as follows:
  • Ongoing evaluation, such as surveys (61%).
  • Choice of specific AW offerings, such as remote working (50%).
  • Planning the programme, including work styles and places (36%).
  • Choosing supportive technologies (22%).
  • The report states that the reduced involvement at the planning stage ‘could be a dangerous trend towards trying to shortcut the AW implementation process’. It’s recommended that involvement is increased via the use of champion groups (compiling feedback from others).

 Employees are no less productive! 

  • Previously, employers have worried that remote workers will not be as productive as in-house staff. However, this concern is now only shared by 5% of businesses.
  • That said, overworking has become the primary AW problem; an issue affecting 56% of respondents. Past surveys have also reflected this to a lesser degree, yet it may have been amplified by the increased ‘attention to people factors’.
  • Respondents are also increasingly struggling to obtain feedback from their managers. It is speculated that this may relate to the fact managers are also adopting AW ways!
  • The authors recommend that both managers and employees are, therefore, trained in how to work in AW settings. In addition, they say ‘stop worrying whether your remote employees are actually working. Like everyone else, they should be measured by results and outcomes’.

These are only some of the fascinating findings on how workplace trends have evolved over the past 10 years; as a result of the AW offerings at our disposal. You can download the full report via the Advanced Workplace Associates website.

7 of the latest features on shifting workplace trends:

  1. The empathy economy
  2. Training for the future
  3. Your future job – and reasons to feel optimistic about it!
  4. Why customer service employees will be most in-demand
  5. The career skills you’ll need by 2020
  6. Measuring your soft skills
  7. The secret of success: for job-seekers, colleagues, managers & bosses!

Source: 

This year’s research comes courtesy of Advanced Workplace Associates, Global Workplace Analytics and Haworth, with the support of Workplace Evolutionaries. Research from 2008-2014 was conducted by New Ways of Working in association with Haworth.



Small businesses face recruitment challenges

Are small businesses really facing extra challenges when recruiting new staff?

A vast 81% of small business leaders believe their recruitment challenges are greater than those faced by their larger business counterparts, according to a report in HR News.

This research specifically relates to companies employing fewer than 10 people, also known as ‘micro-businesses’.

What the stats tell us

  • 34% of companies are finding it hard to source suitable candidates.
  • 42% feel frustrated when they can’t find someone suitable within a month.
  • 59% attribute these challenges to a ‘perceived lack of job security.’
  • 49% believe it’s down to a lack of brand recognition.

Other reasons reported by HR News range from a perceived lack of career progression opportunities to workplace benefits. You’ll find more stats in the article.

It’s all a matter of perception

The research was conducted by Indeed. Commenting on the findings, the company’s UK Managing Director highlighted the need to address misconceptions surrounding the benefits (or rather the perceived pitfalls!) of working for small businesses.

It’s also interesting to consider the companies’ own perceptions. After all, this is qualitative data. Meaning the companies are sharing their opinions on the challenges faced and any potential causes, rather than statistical evidence.

A note for small businesses…

The above isn’t to say that small businesses are not facing unique recruitment challenges. However, larger businesses (even those with household names and HR teams!) still face their own recruitment struggles.

Back in the Autumn, HR News shared some interesting comparative stats. In these, smaller companies report a greater challenge in finding people with the right skills and experience, alongside a lack of applications. The larger companies also shared struggles of this nature, albeit not to the same degree.

However, it’s big businesses that are almost a quarter more likely to face direct ‘competition over applicants’, in which they are essentially outbid by competitors.

What this means for your company

Many of these challenges can be overcome with a considered recruitment approach. Sometimes it’s about knowing where to search for candidates, how to approach prospective employees, and better share the benefits of working for your brand. Our recruitment consultants have had many years of experience doing this. We’d be delighted to offer some support: 01225 313130.

As for local job-seekers…

Most UK businesses actually fall into the SME category, employing anywhere from 1 to 249 people. Bath certainly has a strong SME business culture; one that has weathered many business storms!

Small businesses are often incredibly exciting to work for as you can have such a hands-on role in the growth and development of the company. Alongside the connections that you can foster within your team as you develop together. They also offer a variety of other unique benefits, which is why almost half of millennials say this represents their ideal employer size.

We say have a good read of each job spec, ask your recruitment consultant any questions you may have, and review the positives of working for businesses of all sizes!



Work perks: the 9 most sought-after staff benefits

What’s topping the current list of sought-after work perks outside of a pay rise? See how your wish-list benefits compare to those of your colleagues(/competitors!)…

Employee benefits often appear in recruitment and HR news as they play such a primary role in staff attraction. Did you know 85% of candidates are more attracted to organisations that advertise their work perks?

It’s such an easy way to boost the results of your recruitment efforts.

Staff benefits are also one of a number of staff retention tools. And, if you’re reading this from a business perspective, there’s no debate over the importance of a staff retention strategy!

So, which work perks are candidates most hoping for?

SmallBusinessPrices’ research reveals that these are the top desired perks (outside of a pay rise):

  1. Extra annual leave, sabbaticals, or flexible working hours (26.28%)
  2. Travel benefits or a company car (16.41%)
  3. Staff discount packages (11.05%)
  4. Insurance offerings (10.80%)
  5. Wellness benefits (e.g. fitness memberships, massages & bring your dog to work days) (10.54%)
  6. Food and drink (9.18%)
  7. Luxury goods (7.31%)
  8. Events, company outings and ‘dress-down Fridays’ (5.36%)
  9. Staff training budgets (3.06%)

This research spans multiple industries and company structures and was conducted on 2000 employees. It’s interesting to observe the difference in popularity between the most popular option (more than 1/4 of respondents) and the ninth on the list (just over 3%).

Yet it’s also worth considering the context of this research. We’re specifically discussing most desired benefits outside of direct monetary rewards. Looking beyond work perks, we know employees remain highly concerned about their future training and development prospects.

Therefore, employers are encouraged to approach these as ‘workplace extras’; as part of a robust staff retention and development plan.

Returning to the research, let’s see what staff are actually receiving…

The top benefits currently offered outside of a pay rise include…

  1. Staff discounts (19.61%: 3rd most popular)
  2. The extra leave/sabbaticals/flexible working (18.82%: the most popular)
  3. Training budgets (11.82%: 9th most popular)
  4. Food and drink (11.25%: 6th most popular)
  5. Wellness benefits (e.g. fitness memberships, massages & bring your dog to work days) (10.38%: 5th most popular)
  6. Events, company outings and ‘dress-down Fridays’ (10.31%: 8th most popular)
  7. Insurance offerings (9.01%: 4th most popular)
  8. Travel benefits or a company car (5.98%: 2nd most popular)
  9. Luxury goods (2.81%: 7th most popular)

It appears that companies are already largely in touch with what workers want. As you can see, the ‘easiest wins’ may lie in offering additional insurance programmes and/or travel benefits, including company cars. Of course, this may not always be feasible for all organisations.

Pleasingly, the majority of employees surveyed report feeling happy with the work perks they currently receive, either saying they’re ‘somewhat’ (45.3%) or ‘very happy’ (13.86). Only 2.36% say they’re ‘very unhappy’ with their staff benefits.

Don’t forget to catch up on the latest insights into why these results matter, from staff attraction strategies to staff retention programmes.



Employers competing for candidates

Employers competing for candidates: the latest facts & ideas to get ahead!

Headline: ‘Businesses pull out all the stops as employment hits record high’

SOURCE: HR Grapevine

Businesses are facing increasingly competitive times as the low national unemployment rate combines with a record number of job vacancies.

This issue is predicted to worsen as EU migration falls post-Brexit. However, this isn’t to say that nobody is experiencing long periods without work. This particular problem appears to worsen by age group:

  • 20% of 18 to 24-year-olds have been out of work for more than a year. This is compared with…
  • 30% of 25 to 49-year-olds 
  • 40% of those aged 50 and above

We’d like to note that the latter category may also be a larger group, as employees retire increasingly later.

Pleasingly for businesses, an increase in job-seekers has been noted for this post-Christmas period.

What to do next – for Employers:

There are a number of simple steps you can take to make yourself more appealing to prospective applicants.

  1. Shout about your staff benefits. 85% of employees are more attracted to companies that do this.
  2. Create an ‘experimentation culture’. You’ll soon be a part of the rare 19% of businesses that bother to do this (despite the fact employees are desperate to utilise their creative thinking abilities)!
  3. Understand the reasons why the majority of workers leave their current roles. And make sure your company addresses as many of these as it can!
  4. Ensure all new employees experience positive ‘onboarding‘.
  5. Understand what’s happening in the world of employment right now. Again, make sure your company is leading the way and taking a progressive approach to business management.

What to do next – for Employees & Job-seekers:

While it’s exciting to hear you’re in demand, this isn’t to say you should rest on your laurels! Businesses are still very much looking for the right candidate for each role.

It’s time to refer to ‘It’s not just what you do, it’s how you show you do it!’ towards the bottom of this post. Each of the five links will help you to highlight exactly how you are the right person for the job.

All parties are encouraged to seek the advice of a qualified recruitment consultant in their field for access to the best candidates and jobs for their specific needs. Please call Appoint on 01225 313130.