Social media: a reminder to check your feeds!

Another reminder to check your social media feeds if you’re looking for a new job…

No doubt you’re already using your social media within your job search. It’s such a convenient way to watch out for new and urgent vacancies and to keep up-to-date with the latest in career news and advice.

(Tip: you can find us on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn for all of the aforementioned!)

However, even if you’re not actively using your feeds to research new jobs, your prospective employers may be using them to research you! What’s more, there may be multiple ways you’re putting them off…

When social media stops candidates from getting the job:

The Muse has shared 8 times that real-life candidates have been rejected from a role due to something they did or said on their social feeds.

In summary, the examples include:

  • Social media arguments
  • A clear case of lying
  • An offensive profile picture
  • Resharing items from inappropriate feeds
  • Swearing and expressing anger about personal interests
  • ‘Antithetical’ viewpoints (those in contrast to the company’s)
  • Derogatory doodles
  • And sharing plans to ‘party all summer’…having just accepted a summer job

Each example is elaborated upon in the piece. It’s also important to note that these aren’t the only reasons someone could lose out on a role due to their social persona.

That’s the key:

Your social media profiles offer a glimpse into your public, personal and professional personas. As for the good news, this means that there are also ways that you can use your feeds to create a positive impression:

  • Take another look at your profile photos. Even if your account is set to ‘Private,’ prospective employers may be able to see this part. What do your pictures say about you?
  • Consider using the Private mode for your more personal accounts. Particularly if you’re yet to review these.
  • Review and delete any conversations that could be taken offensively or out of context. You could always ask a trusted friend or associate to help you with this part.
  • Watch out for contradictions: for example, if you always promote your energy and enthusiasm in interviews yet regularly post about your exhaustion and boredom.
  • Try to use your social feeds to share more meaningful content that better represents you within your target industry. This could include sharing business and/or cultural news, promoting positive projects, discussing your personal development activity (books, courses, etc.), supporting others, and generally engaging in helpful or beneficial conversations.

We’ll leave you to review your feeds! Don’t forget to regularly check in with our Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn posts, alongside our jobs page



The average weekday morning routine

What does your weekday morning routine look like? If it features alarm snoozing, multiple cups of tea, and a few cross words (unsurprisingly that’s angry words rather than puzzles!), you’re very much in line with the average Brit…

As a nation, each workday morning we:

  • Snooze our alarms five times
  • Consume two teas
  • Swear four times before 9 o’clock
  • Have at least two rounds of ‘cross words’ with our partners
  • And break up two or more fights between our children
  • We also hunt for both our mobile phones and keys twice over before leaving the house

This is all according to research conducted by Dunelm. You can compare your morning against the rest of the nation’s data in this recent HR News post.

How media features in our morning routine:

The article also cites some fascinating details when it comes to how else we’re using our time. Collectively we…

  • Spend 3 million hours ‘browsing social media’ from the bed, bathroom and breakfast table.
  • Respond to 97 million emails before we’ve even got up.
  • And watch 16 million hours of morning TV.
  • Breaking this down into minutes, the average working person spends 6 minutes on checking their work emails and another 6 minutes on posting to social media from their beds. Yet we only allow 7 minutes to eat breakfast (with more than 1/4 doing this while rushing around the house). That’s also less time than spent on styling one’s hair and reading the online news.

The morning mood…

A number of potential ‘morning downers’ are identified, including missing public transport, traffic jams, arguments, and not knowing what to wear, among others.

With all the stats combined, it’s no wonder that more than 1/4 of professionals feel stressed as soon as they wake up, with 76% of people finding weekday mornings worst of all.

Are there any solutions?

Weekday mornings are always going to present their challenges, especially for anyone with additional caring responsibilities or health needs. Anything you can do to manage your stress levels is going to help improve your morning routine. Or, at least, how that routine makes you feel!

Prepping whatever you can the night before, prioritising sleep, and avoiding the lure of social media first thing in the day could be a great place to start.

Alongside this, ask yourself whether there’s anything else contributing to your morning stress load. It’s said that 97% of people are frustrated in their work. Frustration can lead to nitpicking (and an all-around shorter fuse with those around you!) as well as more of a desire to procrastinate.

If job frustration is ruining your morning routine, and the rest of your working week, why not take a look at the latest job vacancies?