Social media: a reminder to check your feeds!

Another reminder to check your social media feeds if you’re looking for a new job…

No doubt you’re already using your social media within your job search. It’s such a convenient way to watch out for new and urgent vacancies and to keep up-to-date with the latest in career news and advice.

(Tip: you can find us on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn for all of the aforementioned!)

However, even if you’re not actively using your feeds to research new jobs, your prospective employers may be using them to research you! What’s more, there may be multiple ways you’re putting them off…

When social media stops candidates from getting the job:

The Muse has shared 8 times that real-life candidates have been rejected from a role due to something they did or said on their social feeds.

In summary, the examples include:

  • Social media arguments
  • A clear case of lying
  • An offensive profile picture
  • Resharing items from inappropriate feeds
  • Swearing and expressing anger about personal interests
  • ‘Antithetical’ viewpoints (those in contrast to the company’s)
  • Derogatory doodles
  • And sharing plans to ‘party all summer’…having just accepted a summer job

Each example is elaborated upon in the piece. It’s also important to note that these aren’t the only reasons someone could lose out on a role due to their social persona.

That’s the key:

Your social media profiles offer a glimpse into your public, personal and professional personas. As for the good news, this means that there are also ways that you can use your feeds to create a positive impression:

  • Take another look at your profile photos. Even if your account is set to ‘Private,’ prospective employers may be able to see this part. What do your pictures say about you?
  • Consider using the Private mode for your more personal accounts. Particularly if you’re yet to review these.
  • Review and delete any conversations that could be taken offensively or out of context. You could always ask a trusted friend or associate to help you with this part.
  • Watch out for contradictions: for example, if you always promote your energy and enthusiasm in interviews yet regularly post about your exhaustion and boredom.
  • Try to use your social feeds to share more meaningful content that better represents you within your target industry. This could include sharing business and/or cultural news, promoting positive projects, discussing your personal development activity (books, courses, etc.), supporting others, and generally engaging in helpful or beneficial conversations.

We’ll leave you to review your feeds! Don’t forget to regularly check in with our Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn posts, alongside our jobs page