The employee experience: what matters now?

Employers should be more aware of the employee experience, suggests national research…

What is ’employee experience?’

Forbes defines this as “the sum of all interactions that an employee has with their employer during the duration of their employment relationship.”

This comprises an employee’s ‘feelings, emotions and perceptions’ regarding every experience they have along the way; starting right from the initial recruitment stage. It also includes daily interactions and the experience of eventually leaving an organisation.

Why is this such an issue?

Few UK employers are discussing the topic. Which also means that few businesses are managing to meet their employees’ changing expectations.

We know that 48% of employees have even left a role due to a job not meeting their expectations, so this could be a costly problem.

How could an employer improve their approach?

Company owners, business managers, and HR leaders need to have a good look at things from their team’s perspective, considering:

  • Recruitment activity: everything from interviews to keeping the candidate informed throughout the process.
  • Welcoming new team members: who does this and how efficient are initial training procedures?
  • Solving any ongoing issues, with an approachable point of contact for any concerns.
  • Whether the company is making the best use of technology.
  • Creating a pleasant work environment.
  • How staff members are recognised and rewarded for their work.
  • Ensuring individuals are treated well right through to their final days with the company.

Recognising and rewarding the team:

This is a vital area – and one that forms the focus of the People Management feature. Research shows:

  • 90% of people deem ‘recognition and rewards’ to be important to their employee experience.
  • 62% ‘hardly ever or never’ feel appreciated, yet 72% would ‘work harder’ if they did.
  • 48% of respondents say a ‘simple thank you’ makes them feel valued.

The article also recommends a more flexible approach. Rather than offering all employees the same incentives, businesses can find ways to provide truly attractive rewards. Ideas include flexible working and time off for childcare needs.

We’re delighted to support the first stage of your employee experience. Helping to make applicants feel welcome from their initial recruitment experience, providing regular updates, and keeping in touch with candidates through to the start of their employment with you. Please call the office on 01225 313130 for further advice.



The cost of a poor recruitment decision

How each poor recruitment decision mounts up to a vast national cost…

We recently discussed the issues of recruitment and CV fraud  – and detailed some of their financial and non-financial implications.

Well, new data has emerged to illustrate the price paid by the companies mistakenly recruiting fraudulent applicants. Crowe UK reveals that businesses are spending a total of £23.9 billion a year due to recruitment fraud.

As a reminder, this may be due to the use of fake qualifications or falsified documents, such as embellished CVs and applications. Candidates have also secured worryingly high-level roles (including those within medicine and aviation) as a result.

Where is the money going?

These costs comprise a variety of factors, including:

  • Initial recruitment procedures
  • Low productivity
  • ‘Internal investigations’ and disciplinary action
  • External penalties
  • And matters relating to the employer’s reputation
  • Internal costs such as fraud, theft or data breaches, may also apply.

Of course, perfectly reputable candidates may also prove costly if they’re not the right person for the job.

Looking at poor recruitment decisions in general:

The cost of the average unsuitable recruit is as follows (via the REC)

  • Wasted salary: £28,000
  • Wasted training: £1,500
  • Recruiting & training the new employee: £9,730
  • Reduced productivity from the wider team: £29,160
  • And total staff turnover: £54,000

TOTAL: £132,015 per each unsuitable recruit

How can you make better recruitment decisions?

Consider the many ways that you can improve your recruitment processes, including yet not limited to…

  • Clearly identifying your recruitment needs ahead of your candidate search. Consulting your colleagues and/or employees where needed.
  • Dedicating sufficient time to employee attraction and screening.
  • Making certain that your job descriptions truly depict the roles you’re recruiting for – while clearly communicating your expectations and the realities of working for your organisation.
  • Considering any necessary skills assessments.
  • Making use of trial periods and or temp-to-perm contracts where appropriate.
  • Ensuring the utmost efficiency so that you don’t lose any top candidates along the way.

Your recruitment consultant can support you with each of these decisions. Therefore, working closely alongside an expert recruitment agency may help ease much of your time and cost burden.

For further advice about recruitment in Bath and the surrounding area, please call the office on 01225 313130. You can also find out more about our service here.



Working with Gen Z

This year, Gen Z employees are expected to outnumber their millennial peers in the workplace…

Generation Z refers to the population born from about 1996 onwards and it’s a group also referred to as the ‘post-millennials’.

Gen Z differs from other employee groups in a number of ways. Let’s review some of the key findings:

Gen Z: career predictions

Source: HR News

  • This could be a highly mobile employee group. More than 1/2 (55%) intend to hold their first professional role for less than 2 years.
  • Staff retention tools could make all the difference to Gen Z workers. In fact, more than 70% of employees would remain in their job for up to 5 years if certain benefits were in place.
  • The most popular benefits include training and mentorship opportunities (76%), flexible working options (63%), and the potential for home working (48%). Although, they may not always want to use the latter. We’ll return to this topic shortly!
  • Prospective employees also want to see more job details provided up-front in job descriptions (68%).

Gen Z: ‘dropping out’ of the recruitment process

Source: Recruiting Times

  • 18% of this staff group are currently ‘dropping out’ of existing recruitment processes.
  • Gen Z employees crave a more ‘personal connection’ with their employers. And a lack of this may prove a barrier to their job application and acceptance decisions.
  • New technologies may attract and engage these candidates throughout the recruitment process. This could include everything from interview tools to digital exercises and even online mentoring schemes.
  • Efforts towards meaningful engagement can help improve the candidate experience. Any negative insights could also be publicised via digital platforms.

Gen Z: politically and socially aware

Source: Independent

  • Generation Z’s business perceptions are highly influenced by recent ‘social, technological and geopolitical’ change.
  • Employees are more attracted to companies who prioritise ‘diversity, inclusion and flexibility’.
  • Alongside a focus on tolerance, businesses should resolve any issues surrounding pay levels and workplace culture.

Gen Z: blurred lines

Source: HR News

  • The boundaries between work and play may be fuzzier for post-millennial employees. Many (65%) perceive a ‘fun environment’ to be a core component of a positive workplace culture. Conversely, only 22% of Baby Boomers (workers aged 55 and above) agree.
  • It’s a sociable group and 81% say communal areas are important at work.
  • A mere 8% of workers think they would perform better working from home (whereas the national average is 20%).
  • Many candidates value friendships at work (43% versus 22% of Baby Boomers).

A reminder about age discrimination…

These are fantastic insights for employers looking to attract a diverse workforce. Naturally, this type of data will always be somewhat of a generalisation and it’s important to get to know the specific needs and wants of all prospective employees – something an expert Recruitment Consultant can assist with!

In addition, it’s also vital that businesses remain aware of age discrimination laws. LawDonut has one of the best FAQ guides we’ve seen on this subject.

For further staff attraction advice, please call the office on 01225 313130. Candidates can also search and apply for jobs here