How will the coronavirus affect your job search?

How will the coronavirus affect your job search?

We all know that this is an anxious and unsettling time. The UK is still in the early stages of the coronavirus and there’s a lot of uncertainty surrounding its impact on the nation. This includes uncertainty regarding how businesses will operate over the coming months.

Of course, any business disruption may naturally have an impact on recruitment plans – which may also directly affect your job search. So what should you be doing and considering at this time?

First things first…

We hope this would go without saying, yet your health should remain of the utmost priority. As should the health of your wider community!

If you are exhibiting any symptoms of respiratory illness (even if you think it’s just a cold), you should avoid attending in-person meetings and interviews. It’s wise to contact your recruitment consultant (or the employer if you’re not working with a recruitment agency) at the earliest possible time. Even if this is on the day of the scheduled interview!

Please note: you must call 111 if you believe you have any symptoms of coronavirus.

Always politely apologise for the inconvenience caused by your rescheduling and enquire about the possibility of other interview arrangements.

Alternative interview arrangements:

Depending on the employer’s availability and resources, don’t be surprised if you’re offered a telephone or Skype-based interview.

You should treat such interviews just as you would an in-person meeting. In other words, you should be researching and preparing for your interview!

If you’ll be conducting the interview by Skype or another video resource, you still want to dress as if you’re attending an in-person interview. You’ll also want to consider your body language throughout.

When speaking by phone, ensure to make an effort to communicate in a positive tone. Smiling can help to convey a more friendly tone, even though this may feel odd!

When meeting in person…

Be prepared for certain customs to be a little different. For instance, many health experts say handshakes aren’t recommended at this time; however much this goes against our cultural instincts and traditional interview etiquette! A smile with a polite nod and/or wave has become an appropriate alternative.

Many offices will also have hand sanitisers in their reception areas. Politely ask to use these when entering and exiting the building (or use your own) to demonstrate your awareness and initiative at this time.

Respect any efforts your interviewer makes towards social distancing…without trailing miles behind them!

Keep applying:

Please never assume that all new recruitment plans are on hold! Many businesses are operating as normal through these times. Furthermore, some employers will actually have more time to review their recruitment needs as they adopt different working arrangements.

It’s still a great time for you to make job applications, conduct job market research, carry out interview prep, and contact recruitment agencies.

Prepare for the unexpected:

We’ve said it before, job searches can feature a number of setbacks. During such times of change, there’s an increased likelihood of employers altering their recruitment plans at short notice.

This also increases the likelihood of recruitment delays and/or rejections. We recommend taking some time to mentally prepare for such setbacks – discussing any concerns with your recruitment consultant.

And keep in touch!

Don’t forget to keep in touch with your consultant, whether that’s to let them know about your changing plans, advise them of self-isolation, rearrange interviews, or seek some advice about your job search. You can reach your Appoint consultant via 01225 313130.

* Important Reminder * – the government is updating its coronavirus advice on a daily basis. Please stay abreast of the latest recommendations regarding your health and social interactions. 



Understanding & overcoming imposter syndrome

Do you suffer from imposter syndrome, plus which industries are most affected?

Imposter syndrome is defined as “the persistent inability to believe that one’s success is deserved or has been legitimately achieved as a result of one’s own efforts or skills.”

It’s such a common phenomenon that almost 40% of UK employees may be affected. What’s more, a small number (2%) constantly experience such doubts.

Employees generally say they’re unsure they’re able to ‘fulfill all of the requirements of their current jobs.’

Certain professions experience this more often. For instance:

  1. Creatives, including artists and designers (52%)
  2. Finance professionals (47%)
  3. PR, Media, and Marketing employees (46%)
  4. Doctors, Nurses, and Dentists (44%)
  5. And IT professionals (43%)

Conversely, the professions exhibiting the greatest confidence levels include:

  • Sales professionals (78%)
  • Plumbers, electricians, and builders (72%)
  • And retail employees (68%)

In addition to these professional divides, men are more confident in their abilities than women (67% of men say they’re 100% confident in their abilities, versus only 58% of women). Older employees also express the greatest confidence levels (88% for over 65s versus 57% for 18 to 24-year-olds).

Job security fears are additionally causing some concern:

  • Only 54% of employees feel fully secure in their work.
  • 24% cite recent industry job losses as the reason for this, alongside:
  • A ‘competitive job market’ (17%)
  • And the effects of Brexit (14%)

How to overcome your imposter syndrome…

Considering its prevalence, it’s no wonder that this is such a popular topic. Thankfully, this also means there’s a lot of advice out there regarding how to overcome this affliction. Some of our favourite articles include:

  • Scott H. Young’s post on Medium. It’s a 7-minute read described as ‘a guide to living with the fear of not being good enough’. It explores some of the causes of the syndrome alongside some steps you can take to beat it.
  • Forbes’ 15 ways to overcome the syndrome. As the name suggests, this is a highly practical and tip-filled feature.
  • Mindful’s article, which includes a brief TedEd video alongside three simple steps.

Don’t be afraid to discuss your imposter syndrome with your friends and family. It really will help you to see how common this issue is.

Finally, keep an eye on our News page to ensure you stay up to date with all the latest career tips and news.



New job considerations

What tops your list of new job considerations? Here’s what the rest of the UK is saying…

Today marks the start of National Careers Week. In honour of the occasion, a new survey has explored the most important elements people consider when making a job change.

The top new job considerations are said to include…

  1. Salary level (64%)
  2. Working hours (55%)
  3. Location (50%), tied with personal interest or enjoyment (also 50%)
  4. Job security (40%)
  5. The working environment (37%)
  6. Progression opportunities (26%)
  7. Training/skills development opportunities (23%)
  8. The opinions of your family or partner (12%)
  9. Status (9%)

What makes this survey stand out?

Firstly, it’s interesting to see some research that explores the holistic nature of work. At first glance, you may think this is simply a list of work perks. However, the study also encompasses some of the more psychological and interpersonal elements, such as the opinions of others and our perceived status.

This is refreshingly honest, although it’s also great to see that some of the more individual elements such as job enjoyment come much higher.

It also supports other recent recruitment news findings. Examples include…

How is this data relevant to you?

  • As a job-seeker: it’s another example of the questions you can ask yourself ahead of your job search. Understanding your own priorities can really help you decide where to focus your attention – and, of course, which jobs to apply for. For instance, if you know personal enjoyment sits far higher than salary for you, then there’s little point in applying for a role that doesn’t spark some interest. Or if your work is all about paying the bills, you’ll want to stay loyal to your initial salary range.
  • As an employer: it’s always helpful to remember what candidates are looking for. Each candidate will have their own order of priorities and these can change throughout their careers. While you may not be able to lead the way on every front, see which of these aspects you can highlight throughout your recruitment activity and, for that matter, which aspects you could introduce or build on in the future.

Don’t forget to keep an eye on our News page for regular recruitment news and advice features. You can also connect with us over on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn and/or register your CV for local opportunities



Coping with job search setbacks

What to do when you encounter job search setbacks…

While it would be wonderful if everyone had a smooth job search experience, some disappointments are likely. It could be anything from finding out that a position has already closed to not being selected for an interview.

However, if you’re mentally prepared for such happenings, it’s easier to stay on track and maintain some motivation. If this talk of mental prep sounds familiar, it’s something we discussed in this feature on the four job search phases last month. The four phases were identified by Kourtney Whitehead, whose advice we’ll be discussing again today – this time regarding the three ‘unavoidable job search setbacks’.

The three job search setbacks include:

1. Being rejected for a ‘position you’re clearly qualified for’ 

There are some great insights here, including three core messages that particularly ring true:

  1. Many applicants encounter this
  2. It doesn’t reflect your individual ‘market value’
  3. You won’t necessarily “experience predictable outcomes throughout your search”

Interviews can be like exams; sometimes the ones you think you’ve failed are actually the ones you’ve passed with flying colours! Of course, this can apply in reverse and sometimes it’s the jobs you think that you’re a shoo-in for that you don’t get.

This is a topic we’ve covered in more depth on our post about handling interview rejection; even if it happens multiple times.

2. Finding a great opening that doesn’t meet your salary expectations

Whitehead’s advice stands out here because it’s so realistic to everyday job market happenings. Whereas many articles will tell you to ask for more than an advertised salary, Whitehead points out that if you’re not willing to work for the advertised salary range you should be upfront from the start.

She’s not saying that companies won’t ever pay more for the right person. However, some budgets are fixed for a reason and you don’t want to waste anyone’s time, including your own.

This issue can be easier to raise when working via a Recruitment Consultant – allowing you to have a frank conversation outside of the pressures of an interview setting. Your Consultant can help manage your expectations and let you know whether there’s the possibility of flexibility or not.

3. Not getting a job you feel ’emotionally attached’ to

Not many people discuss this common issue. Perhaps before you’ve so much as attended an interview (or even submitted a CV!) you’re envisaging life in your new role…and you really like your visions of the future.

But then you get the rejection and it’s far worse than usual because you feel as if something has actually been taken away from you.

In this case, Whitehead recommends making some rejection plans. She suggests speaking to your closest friends and family and letting them know what you need from them during these trickier times – whether that’s time alone or some extra company and conversation.

Even if you don’t feel you have a support network around you, you can plan some activities to help pick yourself up in the case of bad news. Again, you should hopefully feel able to confide in your Recruitment Consultant during these times!

You can read the rest of Kourtney Whitehead’s advice via Forbes.

Get your local job search started via our jobs page and/or submit your CV via the website.



Staff over tech for high growth companies

It’s all a question of staff over tech, according to high growth small businesses in the UK…

Before we get into the stats, it’s important to understand the value of high growth small businesses. These are the companies that:

  • Account for only 2.9% of UK businesses, yet contribute to 84% of ‘net employment growth’ (employing a total of 1.9 million+ workers).
  • Alongside this, they’re 24% more productive than lower growth small companies – producing an additional ‘3 months of economic output’ for the nation each year.

Clearly, these are incredibly valuable companies that we can all learn from.

It’s about staff over tech for business success:

When Octopus Group asked high growth small businesses what most contributes to their success, they said…

  1. Great staff (60%)
  2. A great idea or product (53%)
  3. Tech helped make the product development cheaper/easier (29%)
  4. The web helped them to market the business more easily (29%)
  5. An ability to secure funding at the right time (24%)

Even the business’s idea or product, considered fundamental to more than half of the companies, isn’t deemed as critical as its employees.

It’s always rewarding to see firms recognise the value of their teams in this way. We’ve long witnessed the difference that a truly effective team makes to a business.

Are you an employer struggling to recruit?

You’re far from alone! 1/4 of UK employers are currently struggling to recruit the talent they need.

Recruitment should never be about simply filling seats by job title and/or years of experience alone. It’s about finding people with the right personality, mindset and skillset to complement the rest of your team and business goals.

Sometimes it’s also about being able to see what others haven’t. Spotting that person who doesn’t come from the same career path or industry yet who has all of the skills and attitude you’re looking for and is ready to learn the rest.

Why not find a recruitment partner who will work closely to understand your business and team goals? You can call Appoint on 01225 313130 to discuss your local recruitment needs today.

Are you a candidate who’s struggling to enter a new career?

This is the post for you.

Remember to keep an eye our News page for further career news and advice updates. You can also connect with us via Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn and/or register your CV for local opportunities



The most motivated age

When do employees reach their most motivated age? And what’s wrong with these sorts of findings?

The Independent’s latest careers news headline caught our eye. It states that ‘people are most driven aged 33.’ The article, based on research by Bupa Health Clinics, suggests that this is the age when people are likely to be more motivated, confident, energetic and positive.

This apparently applies to all of our goals from career intentions to healthy lifestyle plans. While the article and research are clearly well-intentioned, it’s important to note that these findings are also highly generalised and don’t reflect other research data.

Earlier studies have found that it’s the over-55s employee who is the most motivated. Plus it’s likely that we’ll soon hear Gen Z is leading the way on this front!

In reality…

There are extremely motivated individuals of every working age. Working closely with candidates across all career stages has shown us this time and time again.

Fear not if you’re only just embarking on your career and want to prove your motivation – or if 33 is a long distant memory – your individual drive can peak at any time. What’s more, there’s nothing to say you’ll only have one peak in your career.

What motivates you?

More detailed studies have suggested that the drivers that motivate employees may change throughout the career cycle.

For instance, older workers may be more inspired by roles that feature ‘autonomy and personal principles’ whereas younger employees may desire greater ‘competition and career progression.’

Even these drivers will naturally vary individually. With all this in mind, there are a few important questions to consider…

  • How motivated do you feel right now?
  • What actually motivates you?
  • And is there anything you need to change to increase your motivation at this career stage?

One example change is finding others to support you – something said to help 70% of respondents in the first survey piece.

A new opportunity may also prove to be an important driver for you.



The worst day of the week?

What’s the worst day of the working week…and which professionals are most likely to suffer from Sunday night fear? 

Mondays have long earned a reputation for being the least popular day. After all, it’s the day that most people are grappling with all of the firsts of the working week. Commutes, refilled inboxes, and task lists included!

However, it appears Tuesday may actually be the least popular day, with only 5% of respondents picking it as their favourite.

Friday is unsurprisingly the most popular working day for 57% of people. 63% also report an overall improvement in their week once they’ve passed the Wednesday ‘hump’.

Mondays are still causing their issues, with more than 1 in 4 professionals (26%) saying they’ve called in sick due to Sunday night fear.

The Sunday night fear (often referred to as the Sunday Scaries or Sunday Night Blues), is a sense of dread, worry and/or anxiety about the working week ahead. It crops up anywhere from a Sunday afternoon to a Sunday evening.

Which professionals are most likely to suffer the Sunday Scaries?

Employees in certain industries report greater levels of this phenomenon, including:

  1. Media (68%)
  2. Electronics (50%)
  3. Legal (50%)
  4. Leisure & Tourism (50%)
  5. And social care (46%)

You can find the full top 9 in the HR Review feature.

The article contains advice for employers to ‘evaluate their company cultures;’ particularly addressing issues of stress, high workload, and poor work-life balance.

Employees may also want to review how often they feel this way. If you’re constantly struggling through your working weeks, are there any small changes you can make to improve things (including anyone you can speak to at work)? If not, a fresh challenge may be welcome.

Visit our jobs page for the latest local opportunities. You’ll also find lots of positive career advice in this post (scroll to the bottom for extra reading links).



Recruitment challenges for employers

Exploring the primary recruitment challenges that employers are facing right now…

1 in every 4 employers is struggling to recruit the talent they need, which means the talent shortage is now at its worst level since 2008 (according to a Manpower survey).

The challenge appears even greater for large companies, with 51% of those employing more than 250 people currently facing a skills shortage.

A separate study conducted by CV-Library additionally found that 84.2% of businesses have a ‘lack of relevant candidates’ for their vacancies. Despite this, 87.5% of companies are confident about their recruitment plans for the year ahead.

The top recruitment challenges employers plan to address this year:

  • Sourcing better quality candidates (64.5%)
  • Prioritising this focus on quality over quantity (92.6%)
  • Bringing down their cost per hire (44.6%)
  • Creating ‘talent pools for the future’ (38.8%)
  • ‘Developing their employer brand’ (33.9%)
  • Reducing the duration of the recruitment process (31.4%)

Returning to the first survey, a number of employee priorities are identified.

These factors may support an increased candidate attraction focus:

  • Flexible and remote working opportunities: most sought by employees aged 35-44
  • Attractive pay offerings: most prioritised by employees aged 45-55
  • A positive work-life balance: especially appealing to the over-65s
  • The right management staff: vital to those between 18-24
  • Increases in ‘salary and childcare subsidies’: particularly attractive to 25 to 34-year-olds
  • Furthermore, the increased autonomy regarding ‘when and where’ work is completed, a positive work-life balance, and skills development opportunities are additionally discussed as important for all employees

The above-referenced age groups are as per the survey findings. However, it’s important to note that job priorities are highly individual and don’t always fall into neat categories.

Most candidates have multiple priorities that will shift in their order of importance on a fairly regular basis depending on what else is going on in their lives at that time. To this end, it’s best to review all staff attraction opportunities, alongside treating job applicants and team members as the individuals they are.

It’s good news for employers…

Working with an expert recruitment team can help you address your top recruitment challenges:

  • Attracting quality job applicants through access to a variety of industry tools (alongside benefiting from the agency’s own local reputation)
  • Reducing cost per hire – by reducing the possibility of making bad recruitment decisions
  • Creating those future talent pools through long-term partnerships with your consultants. The better they know and understand your business, the better they are able to source the right people for your team
  • Communicating your employer brand to new and prospective candidates
  • In addition to reducing the overall duration of your recruitment process through expert planning and coordination

To discuss your recruitment needs, please call the office on 01225 313130 or email us today. You can also find out more about our client service here



A year of big change & a positive start!

2020 looks set to be a year of big change for employees and businesses.

We’re dedicating the next month to a number of positive news posts to help inspire your 2020 career plans. We’ll explore everything from personality traits to coping with SAD, pay rises, career changes, and the value of career plans themselves.

Before the series officially launches tomorrow, we’re going to focus on why such a focus is necessary…

Big change is ahead!

The latest findings suggest that:

  • Around 1/2 of British employees plan to change jobs this year.
  • This could come at a cost of approximately £195 to businesses each day.
  • In addition, businesses are already struggling to recruit with unemployment levels remaining exceptionally low.

As for the customer services industry…

  • Almost 40% of customer service professionals intend to find a new role.
  • January is considered the worst month of the year for this group’s happiness levels.
  • As a result, 5% of respondents will leave their customer service job this month alone. This figure may not sound vast, yet could cost UK businesses £201,757,500 in January!

Employers are already worried:

  • Only last month 2/5 of business leaders reported a ‘constant battle’ with staff retention.
  • Almost 1/2 of HR professionals expect to lose 10% of their team during any business year.
  • What’s more, 14% of the nation’s new recruits leave their roles within their first 30 days, and 39% do so within the first six months.

Let’s turn to some positives…

If more professionals make these job moves as planned, more candidates will be available for existing and new job opportunities. This could help to shake up the skills shortage the UK has experienced over recent years.

What’s more, the research data also presents some additional (and valuable!) insights.

  • The study that said 1/2 of British people will change jobs this year also identified the number one employee retention tool – working for a company with a purpose. Or ‘the positive reason the organisation exists, what drives it forward and what it stands for.’
  • A separate study found that 90% of employees working for businesses with ‘clearly defined and motivational purposes’ feel engaged at work. That’s 58% more employee engagement than companies that don’t have clear and positive purposes!
  • On the customer services side, it’s found that employee retention levels can be enhanced through ‘regular and timely feedback, non-financial rewards, and healthcare and flexitime.’ Pay rates also hold influence for 53% of these respondents.

If you’re reading this as a current or prospective job-seeker…

  • This sort of research data has multiple benefits for your job search. Firstly, it’s helpful to know what other employees prioritise as it can help you understand and clarify your own goals.
  • You may also feel it’s time for you to seek out a company with a greater purpose, or you may be looking to work with more likeminded people, increase your salary, and/or seek experience in a new sector. There are no rights and wrongs – these are your career goals!
  • In addition, knowing that application numbers may increase can you help you focus your efforts on those roles you are most interested in.
  • Visit our jobs page to apply for the latest opportunities. You can also upload your CV here.

If you’re reading this as an employer or manager…

  • You can also use this data to your advantage. Even if you know your business serves a positive purpose, you need to find ways to clearly communicate this to your team (and any customers or clients you serve).
  • It’s helpful to review your staff retention levels and strategies as a whole. Ever high or increasing employee turnover levels often indicate something is going wrong – whether that’s down to an unhappy working environment, absent staff retention strategy, or even recruiting the wrong people in the first place.
  • Even businesses used to steady staffing levels will likely see an increase in employee departures if the above stats ring true. This knowledge can help you get prepared and proactive in your recruitment plans.
  • Be sure to find a trusted recruitment partner to support you. For further advice, please call the office on 01225 313130.

We hope you all enjoy this month’s features and it helps you start your own year of big changes! 



Christmas: some quality time off or time to job hunt?!

Should you use your Christmas break for some time off or as your prime time to job search? 

With Christmas Eve arriving tomorrow (whether it feels as if it’s arrived too soon or not!), it’s decision-making time.

Are you going to put your job hunt on hold for the duration of the festivities or are you going to step up your search ahead of the New Year? We’ll take a look at both options…

The pros of taking some time off:

If you’re already employed (and unless you work in retail, hospitality or similar), this is likely to be one of your longest breaks in the working year. It’s been a tough year for many professionals, with increasing numbers of people said to be at breaking point. It’s also the year that WHO expanded on its definition of burnout syndrome.

To top this all off, national productivity has plummeted and there’s even more research to prove that happy employees are more successful.

With all this in mind, the option of a break to unwind and enjoy yourself has clear benefits.

What’s more, it can sometimes take a proper break to gain a bit of perspective.

If you’re feeling run down, burned out and/or desperate for a break, it could be wise to use all or at least most of your leave for some time away from thoughts of work and job searching. You’ll likely feel more capable and confident as a result.

Why it could be the prime time to job hunt:

With many offices closed and (hopefully) now having a little more time to yourself, it can be an excellent opportunity to focus your mind on what you want to achieve in the New Year. It’s not uncommon to feel even more motivated as a result.

You’ll get the chance to research jobs more thoroughly, helping you to identify the most appealing and suitable opportunities.

The extra time can also allow you to put together a better quality CV than you’d compile on the average busy evening or weekend. You could even ask any willing friends and/or family to lend some thoughts on anything you might have missed out in your first draft.

It’s also a chance to make sure your CV is one of the first to arrive in inboxes ahead of the January return.

So, which is the best option for you?

This is a tricky question to answer. It’s most likely one that only you can answer – or someone very close to you who knows how you’ve been feeling lately.

Our best advice is to make sure you’re using at least some of your Christmas break to relax and recharge. However, providing as you’re not feeling unwell or burned out, you could also schedule some time for advancing your career. Perhaps following that period of proper relaxation to get the best of both worlds!

Reminder: if your stress is starting to interfere with the quality of your life (in and/or out of work), you should speak to your GP.

Also, if you’ve experienced a sense of career failure recently, please read this post. It may give you more confidence before those festive catch-ups!

Ready to start/continue your job search? Here are the latest opportunities.