Bath is one of the UK’s most woke cities!

Bath is one of the UK’s most woke cities in which to live and work…

For those less familiar with the term, the word ‘woke’ originates in American slang. The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines this as being “aware of and actively attentive to important facts and issues (especially issues of racial and social justice).”

To this end, it’s often used interchangeably with other words that describe progressive attitudes and behaviours.

How do you measure a city’s woke status?

Bankrate has ranked 50 cities across seven specific categories, which include:

  1. Google search trends: how frequently the city’s web users have searched for the followings terms over a 5-year period:  ‘LGBT’, ‘Fair Trade’, ‘Volunteering’, ‘Climate Change’, ‘Feminism’, ‘Protest’, ‘Sustainability’, ‘Charity’, ‘Human Rights’ and ‘Politics’.
  2. The gender pay gap: the disparity between wages for men and women.
  3. Recycling rates: the quantity of household waste that is recycled.
  4. Voter turnout: comparing ‘the size of each electorate with the total number of votes in the 2017 General Election.’
  5. Vegan & vegetarian: from the perspective of a reduced carbon footprint; counting the number of exclusively vegan and vegetarian eating establishments.
  6. ULEV registration: the number of vehicles registered as ‘ultra-low emission’, which usually refers to ‘electric or hybrid cars.’
  7. Council diversity: exploring the representation of women and minority groups in local government.

Full details of each category and data sources can be found on the Bankrate site.

How progressive is Bath?

Bath is officially the third most woke city in which to live and work, according to this assessment scale. The city receives a total score of 22.31.

Only Oxford and Brighton & Hove achieve greater progressiveness scores, reaching 23.82 and 23.33 respectively.

Bath performs especially well for its:

  1. Recycling rates: achieving a score of 4.6/5. This surpasses Oxford’s 4.2 and Brighton’s 2.4.
  2. Vegan/vegetarian establishments: 4.5/5. Brighton achieves a perfect 5 for this aspect, however, Oxford falls behind with 3.5.
  3. Voter turnout: 3.9/5. Mirroring Oxford (3.9) and only just behind Brighton (4).
  4. ULEV registration: 3.7/5. Beating Brighton’s 2.6 and scoring only marginally less than Oxford’s 3.8. 

However, Bath still needs to work on its:

  1. Council Diversity: 0.6/5: the city’s weakest ranking. Oxford and Brighton, however, each only achieve scores around 2/5 for this element. Wolverhampton, in contrast, receives a 4.3.
  2. Gender Pay Gap: 2/5: this was a low-scoring area for each of the top three cities. None of which even reach a 3/5. Swansea, however, receives an impressive 4.1/5 for its minimal pay gap.
  3. Google Search Trends: 3.1/5: Bath residents and professionals could use the Internet for more progressive means! Brighton & Hove achieves its second perfect score (5/5) for this aspect, yet Oxford also has work to do with its 3.4.

Interestingly, if it wasn’t for the Council Diversity ranking, Bath (21.8) would beat both Oxford (21.4) and Brighton & Hove (21.3). Please note: we haven’t totted up the scores for the rest of the cities to see how else the rankings would change.

Want to work in a woke city?!

We’re proud to have recruited for businesses in Bath and the surrounding area since 1999. You’ll find the latest local job openings listed here.



New mother retention rates & more parental news

Should companies publish their new mother retention rates? Some MPs think so, in order to reduce discrimination levels. There’s also talk of fathers facing discrimination within the latest news for working parents…

The publishing of new mother retention rates

Source: Personnel Today

  • The Women and Equalities Committee is in favour of increased support for new parents – including extended legal protections regarding ‘redundancy for pregnant employees and new mothers’.
  • In addition, they’re calling on the government to take greater action to support parents. They suggest that larger employers should publish their new mother retention rates 12 months after they return to work, as well as 12 months following a flexible working application.
  • It’s not the first time the group has made such recommendations. They follow ‘shocking stories of workplace discrimination’ with concerns surrounding the ’emotional, physical and financial impact on women’.

Many UK working fathers face discrimination 

Source: HR Review

  • 44% of dads say they’ve experienced discrimination after taking up their right to paternity leave or shared parental leave.
  • 1/4 of fathers have received ‘verbal abuse or mockery’ as a result of their choice.
  • More than a third (35%) additionally perceive a negative career impact – such as job loss (17%) or demotions (20%).
  • This may be contributing to a culture of white lies, in which fathers feel unable to be upfront about their ‘family-related responsibilities.’

Could one prominent paternity leave programme make a difference to many more dads?

Source: People Management

  • O2 is increasing its paid paternity leave programme to 14 weeks for permanent team members – while also ensuring that same-sex couples and adoptive and surrogate parents are all included.
  • This policy will be extended to retail workers as well as head office employees, which puts O2 ahead of many of its retail counterparts.
  • While it’s acknowledged that these policies are largely offered by big corporate business, the competitive advantage will likely cause other companies to follow suit. Consequently, we may see reductions in stigma and discrimination.

Leaders need to support flexible working for parents

Source: Personnel Today

Offering flexible working alone is not enough to support working parents, according to ‘The 2019 Modern Families Index: Employer Report’.

Instead, business leaders should look to more actively celebrate the benefits of flexible working. While also helping to reduce the pressure parents feel when considering their working options.

The report suggests employers can make flexibility ‘visible’ from the top tiers of their companies – and educate their employees on how colleagues achieved senior positions through flexible working.

Perhaps this will help to improve the current stats, which show that:

  • 2 in 3 people are finding it ‘increasingly difficult to raise a family.’
  • Only 1/4 of working parents feel they’ve struck the ‘right balance between work, family life and income’.

Looking for a job that better suits your needs? Visit our jobs page



Is it your dream job?

Thinking back to your childhood, and more specifically age 5, what was your dream job? This formed the basis of a viral tweet at the start of this year. So viral, it even made its way into the Independent along with some of its more imaginative(/obscure!) responses.

How about in adulthood – have you made it into your dream job yet?

Even those who dreamed of more realistic roles are likely to respond with a ‘no’ to this question. After all, only 5% of UK adults say they’re in their ideal job. Career barriers appear to include:

  • Concerns regarding financial security
  • ‘Embarrassment’ about starting from scratch
  • Worries that family and friends won’t support your choices
  • Perceived ‘age barriers’
  • And low confidence

What are the UK’s ‘best jobs’?

Experience suggests the response to this question would be highly individual and we’ll each have our own measurement criteria. However, Glassdoor believes the ideal role comprises a combination of three elements

  1. Potential earnings
  2. Job satisfaction
  3. The number of job vacancies

Perhaps even more interestingly, they also say they’ve uncovered the UK’s 25 ‘best jobs’. 15 of which feature the same word…’Manager’.

You can find the full list here, alongside their median base salaries and job satisfaction rankings.

Fantastic news for managers. But what if your dream job doesn’t include management?

Again, let’s remember just how individual our career choices really are. Not everyone longs to manage departments and/or teams and some would rather do anything but this!

Even some existing managers don’t feel suited to their roles. Such as this contributor to The Muse’s career advice column.

The advice that follows is fantastic and largely centres around growing your expertise so that you can achieve career growth without having to follow a set management path.

Identifying your goals:

Perhaps this is the time to question what matters most to you. What are the top three things that you would prioritise in your next job role? Have you got a dream job? And what would career progression look like to you?

Remember to share your thoughts with your recruitment consultant – the more they know about your career goals the better. Be sure to also keep an eye on our jobs page so that you gain more of an insight into what’s out there and what really appeals to you.



The average weekday morning routine

What does your weekday morning routine look like? If it features alarm snoozing, multiple cups of tea, and a few cross words (unsurprisingly that’s angry words rather than puzzles!), you’re very much in line with the average Brit…

As a nation, each workday morning we:

  • Snooze our alarms five times
  • Consume two teas
  • Swear four times before 9 o’clock
  • Have at least two rounds of ‘cross words’ with our partners
  • And break up two or more fights between our children
  • We also hunt for both our mobile phones and keys twice over before leaving the house

This is all according to research conducted by Dunelm. You can compare your morning against the rest of the nation’s data in this recent HR News post.

How media features in our morning routine:

The article also cites some fascinating details when it comes to how else we’re using our time. Collectively we…

  • Spend 3 million hours ‘browsing social media’ from the bed, bathroom and breakfast table.
  • Respond to 97 million emails before we’ve even got up.
  • And watch 16 million hours of morning TV.
  • Breaking this down into minutes, the average working person spends 6 minutes on checking their work emails and another 6 minutes on posting to social media from their beds. Yet we only allow 7 minutes to eat breakfast (with more than 1/4 doing this while rushing around the house). That’s also less time than spent on styling one’s hair and reading the online news.

The morning mood…

A number of potential ‘morning downers’ are identified, including missing public transport, traffic jams, arguments, and not knowing what to wear, among others.

With all the stats combined, it’s no wonder that more than 1/4 of professionals feel stressed as soon as they wake up, with 76% of people finding weekday mornings worst of all.

Are there any solutions?

Weekday mornings are always going to present their challenges, especially for anyone with additional caring responsibilities or health needs. Anything you can do to manage your stress levels is going to help improve your morning routine. Or, at least, how that routine makes you feel!

Prepping whatever you can the night before, prioritising sleep, and avoiding the lure of social media first thing in the day could be a great place to start.

Alongside this, ask yourself whether there’s anything else contributing to your morning stress load. It’s said that 97% of people are frustrated in their work. Frustration can lead to nitpicking (and an all-around shorter fuse with those around you!) as well as more of a desire to procrastinate.

If job frustration is ruining your morning routine, and the rest of your working week, why not take a look at the latest job vacancies?