Reputation matters to job-seekers

Why any business looking to recruit new team members would be wise to take a good look at their reputation.

Today’s discussion rather neatly follows on from our last post. If you haven’t read it yet, it highlights the importance of job skills in relation to the ongoing skills shortage.

With many stats pointing towards both high staff demand and low application numbers, employers must appraise their staff attraction approach. And this is where brand reputation comes into the conversation…

Never more important than now:

It’s said that a brand’s online rep is more important now than ever before. Alongside the recruitment climate we’ve outlined above (and over the past few articles!), we all clearly possess the digital means to thoroughly investigate our prospective employers. The stats suggest:

  • 70% of people will always research an employer’s reputation before applying for a job.
  • 56% would not go on to make an application if the business had ‘no online presence’. 57% say they would distrust these companies.
  • As for what the candidates are searching for, employee satisfaction and how staff are treated top the priority list.

The power of word of mouth…

It’s not only low job application numbers that employers should be concerned about. Future buying behaviour may also be affected by their recruitment reputation.

Perhaps understandably, candidates who’ve been through an unpleasant recruitment experience are less likely to support that employer’s products or services. What’s more, word of mouth could further harm wider purchasing choices.

  • 69% of candidates would discuss their negative experience with others – 81% would do so through one-to-one conversations and 18% via social media broadcasting.
  • 47% who heard about such a negative encounter from a friend would be less willing to purchase the brand’s offerings.
  • The experiences most likely to influence buying behaviour included poor interview encounters, and ‘lack of transparency’ regarding salaries or job descriptions, alongside non-existent interview feedback.

A reputation for the positive:

Thanks to HR News, we’ve observed the importance of employer reputation and the consequences of a poor recruitment rep. Now, we turn to Recruiting Times and the draw of a positive impact.

Employees feel that working for these companies would increase their individual happiness and productivity. In addition, staff members would be willing to leave roles that didn’t prioritise a positive or meaningful ethos.

How companies can work with recruitment agencies to improve their employer reputations

  • As well as ensuring you have an up-to-date and easily found website, why not provide some extra details that support your employer reputation profile? This could include links to any awards you’ve received (especially those for staff management), links to review sites, and HR provisions you’re proud to offer.
  • If you have had any negative reviews as an employer, it may be worth discussing these with your Consultant. Perhaps it came from previous management and new methods are now in place. Honest conversations can help your Consultant to communicate openly with prospective candidates.
  • Sometimes it helps if candidates can meet with one or a few employees during the interview process. This also proves a useful tool for ascertaining potential team fit.
  • Recruitment consultants can advise on how to best conduct the interview process, support you in creating the most appropriate job descriptions and help provide interview feedback/updates.
  • The above can also include a focus on your impact statements and brand purpose. This must be authentic though, or else an excited applicant could soon become a disgruntled employee!

Please call the office on 01225 313130 to discuss your recruitment needs.



Training as an incentive

Why we all need to see training as an incentive at work…

Currently, HR Review reports that only 25% of HR professionals believe their employers provide a ‘learning culture’ for their staff. The remaining three quarters say:

  • They’re still working towards creating a learning environment (59%:).
  • Such a culture is completely absent (11%).
  • This isn’t considered a business priority (5%).

Yet these businesses may want to rethink things. After all…

Employees see training as an incentive to stay in their roles!

In fact, in an HR News post, we hear that 90% of UK employees consider training as ‘vital to furthering their career’.

  • 42% go as far as to say they ‘strongly agree’ with its importance.
  • 95% of respondents aged 55 and over deem this to be ‘crucial’.
  • Alongside this, 86% of people think that continued training will reduce staff turnover levels.

Time is the main barrier for team members choosing whether or not to attend a course. Many employees express worry about having to be away from their desks for too long.

Which takes us onto the question of training strategies…

It seems that out of those who actually offer staff training, many businesses are predominantly focusing their attention on:

  • Trainee level programmes (38%).
  • Coaching style training (35%).

Conversely, the following training types are considered to be ‘low priority’:

  • Online training courses (32%).
  • Onboarding initiatives (27%).
  • ‘Knowledge sharing’ (29%).

But are these businesses making a mistake? The article would suggest so. Referencing the continued focus on the ‘skills economy’ (and the fact 2/3 of employees have resigned due to the absence of training opportunities!), it calls for companies to prioritise ‘modern training practices’.

It’s not only the digital courses that are promoted within this, yet also the need to encourage knowledge sharing so that vital information isn’t lost when employees move on to other roles.

You may also see training as an incentive to attract new staff members in the first place. We can help you shout about the learning and development benefits offered to employees. For further support, please call the office on 01225 313130.

Related reading:



Graduate & millennial salary news

There is a wealth of discussion out there regarding graduates and millennials…and their salaries. Why has this topic become so newsworthy and what is it telling us?

A quick skim of the headlines might present a negative picture. However, read on for some useful links and the positives surrounding these discussions…

Grads fear they will lose jobs to unpaid interns

Source: People Management

More than 1/4 of graduates worry that unpaid interns will secure the best job opportunities. It is also popularly believed that internships offer a great route to that first graduate level role (55% of respondents).

Worryingly, some organisations may still be dangling the carrot of a ‘possible job’ in order to attract unpaid interns. Such strategies can also prove a major barrier to anyone who cannot afford to work for free. Which applies to many of us! Thought unpaid internships weren’t legal? Here are the current rights (via gov.uk).

Reminder: internships aren’t the only route into your first career role. We frequently share job opportunities of this nature. You can also use our job hunting guide to support your search.

Plenty of opportunities, yet frozen salaries

Source: HR News

Graduate demand is still high – no doubt offering a huge relief to this year’s university leavers. However, starting salaries have changed little over the past ten years.

Although this year did feature an increase in the threshold for paying back a student loan. Meaning anyone earning less than £24,000 per annum will not start paying back their loan as yet (providing as they entered university after September 2012).

Concerned that not having a degree will affect your income? These are the best-paying degree-free jobs.

Millennials earn ‘significantly less’ than they thought they would 

Source: Independent

The Office of National Statistics has revealed some fascinating findings. Back in 2011-2012, a number of 16 to 21-year-olds were invited to share their ‘salary and career aspirations’. The difference between expectation and reality has now been reviewed…

  • 1/2 of the youngest respondents (then aged 16-17) predicted that they would earn £35,000 by the time they turned 30 as graduates, or £25,000 per annum as non-graduates. Yet the average 30-year-old currently earns £23,700.
  • Only 7% believed they would they would earn under £20,000. 37% of 22 to 29-year-olds do, however, earn under this threshold.
  • Whereas 5% thought they would earn above £80,000, only 2% of respondents have done so.

For some realistic earning insights: take a good look at the latest jobs listings. Be sure to research both your industry and target locations. You can also keep on top of the latest salary news – including the items recently shared here!

Almost 1/4 of millennials don’t think they’ll be able to afford to retire

Source: HR News

Some millennial workers are concerned that they may never be able to retire, as they cannot afford to ‘invest in their pensions’. Additionally, 1/5 don’t believe a state pension will exist by this time.

1 in 3 workers from this age group currently resides at home with their parents due to their financial constraints.

Younger employees are facing ‘spiralling debts’ 

Source: HR Magazine

Financial stress is rising among younger workers:

  • 70% of under 34-year-olds have to borrow money on a regular basis just to cover daily living expenses and/or settle their monthly bills.
  • 20% of 25 to 34-year-olds say they’re ‘only just coping’.
  • 33% of 25 to 34-year-olds are forced to use credit cards to cover their general costs, while average unsecured debts have reached £14,794.35 for people aged 25 to 44.
  • 45% of under 34-year-olds are suffering performance issues as a result of their financial anxieties, and 40% are experiencing problems with their workplace relationships.

What do these millennial salary news items tell us?

While the news may look negative at first glance, the insights can be used positively – for graduates, millennials, and their employers.

Clearly, financial anxieties greatly affect a large number of younger workers. The more that these issues are discussed, the better we’re able to address them. We instantly think back to our recent exploration of ‘Gen Z’ news, in which employers were advised to incorporate financial schemes into their staff attraction and retention tools.

Alongside this, have another look at the stats above. Many workers from these age groups are not feeling the same level of anxiety. 80% of employees are more than ‘only just coping’, while 3/4 of grads don’t fear that they’ll miss out on job opportunities due to unpaid interns.

We welcome applications from working adults of all age groups. Register your CV today!



September Report on Jobs: recruitment latest

The September Report on Jobs is now available, thanks to the REC and IHS Markit…

Each month IHS Markit and the REC team up to provide us all with the latest recruitment and employment insights. These stats are then widely reported upon throughout the national media.

The September Report on Jobs reveals…

  • Permanent employee placement numbers have seen a rapid increase. In fact, as of August, they rose at their swiftest rate in five months.
  • Temporary employee placements have also experienced a continued increase in demand. However, they’ve done so at their ‘softest’ rate since October 2016.
  • New employee pay rates across both permanent and temporary bookings have additionally increased throughout this period.

What is driving these increased pay rates?

As the September Report on Jobs notes, starting pay rates have risen at a time when inflation has actually softened. It’s the lack of ready candidate supply that appears to underpin this change.

Essentially, businesses are still struggling to source permanent and temporary employees at a time of low unemployment. Permanent staff availability has plummeted more rapidly than that of temporary workers.

How do these findings affect you?

It remains a promising time for job-searching candidates. With high employer demand and low national unemployment, you’re more likely to experience reduced competition for each advertised role.

This isn’t to say this is always the case. After all, certain vacancies naturally draw more applicants regardless of the national statistics.

Keep a close eye on the latest jobs listings to see what is happening in your current or prospective industry.

Businesses will want to consider all aspects of their staff attraction offering. HR Magazine discusses the need for companies to “develop a compelling proposition,” using flexible working, career development opportunities, and creative settings to appeal to more job-seekers.

For professionally tailored recruitment support, please call the office on 01225 313130. 

[Source: REC Sep 2018]



Generation Z makes the recruitment news…

Generation Z has made it into the recruitment and HR news no less than 3 times within a week. And these are only the articles that we’ve spotted. So why are they hitting the headlines right now?

Who is Generation Z?

Millennials, Baby Boomers, and now Generation Z. It can all get somewhat confusing! While specific birth date ranges can vary by source, ‘Generation Z’ (also known as ‘Gen Z’ or ‘post-millennials’) refers to those born somewhere between the mid-90s and early-2000s.

Now let’s look at the news stories in question…

1. The workplace benefits Gen Z is hoping for!

Source: HR News

This first post discusses research conducted by Perkbox, which finds some significant group differences…

  • Over 1/3 of Generation Z consider staff benefits to be ‘one of the most important deciding factors’ when it comes to their career decisions. Possibly making all the difference in whether or not to accept a job offer.
  • They are the most likely to prefer small, frequent, year-round perks in lieu of one large annual offering. Again, this accounts for more than 1/3 of those surveyed.

Simple employee benefits prove most desirable, including: 

  • 86%: enjoying birthdays as annual leave
  • 85%: a ready supply of free hot drinks
  • 83%: flexible working hours (do you remember, this was also the top-rated benefit for Millennials?)

2. How SMEs can attract Generation Z talent

Source: HR Review

Employers are encouraged to use this time to attract the best post-millennial talent or ‘risk missing out’. After all, over 1/3 of this generation intends to commence a new job role or career path within the year.

Additionally, it’s this very month that is singled out as the time that many of the latest graduates will use to start their search.

There are 3 core categories discussed as attraction and retention tools:

  1. Money saving tips: this isn’t something we’ve seen discussed anywhere else in recruitment and HR news, so we read it with interest. The feature explores how Gen Z has been faced with a unique set of financial circumstances, which have created an increasingly budget-conscious generation. To this end, SMEs are encouraged to find ways to promote money-saving offerings such as employee discounts or schemes. They additionally explore the idea of helping new and existing colleagues stay financially aware through reminders, such as using the benefits on offer, as they get closer to Christmas.
  2. Tapping into tech: this generation is incredibly tech-savvy and will connect well with ‘clear and punchy online portals’ as well as mobile-optimised platforms. The idea of motivational staff contests around active wearables (possibly even combined with a rewards scheme) is also discussed.
  3. Health-aware. Gen Z is considered a health-conscious group, with a deeper interest in the foods they consume than ever before. SMEs are encouraged to appeal to these interests by arranging expert speakers on nutrition and wellness, creating company sports days, and even offering workplace health checks. Mental health offerings should also be considered.

3. Generation Z may be missing out…

Source: HR News

In our third and final Gen Z piece, we return to HR News. This article also refers to Millennials, with new data suggesting…

  • 1/3 of these groups wish to work for an SME.
  • Only 18% hope to join a micro-business.
  • Currently, over 1/2 of these groups plan to join a large business or the public sector, with just under 1/2 hoping to work for a ‘global multinational’.

This contradicts previous research on Millennials, raising the question: is Generation Z accounting for a large proportion of these findings, or have perceptions shifted among Millennials?

Why are younger people wanting to work for big businesses?

  • 56% believe SMEs offer reduced job security.
  • 46% perceive they will receive a lower salary level from a smaller business.
  • 33% expect fewer career progression opportunities within SMEs.

And how might Generation Z and the Millennials actually miss out?

As the article states, the greatest majority of UK businesses are in fact SMEs. This is also reflected by the strength of our local business community. What’s more, 70% of UK SMEs are actively searching for new employees to fill ‘entry-level roles’.

All in all, these news items make for thought-provoking reading. We’d be fascinated to hear the insights of Generation Z employees and job-seekers themselves. Do you feel this data applies to you? Let us know via TwitterFacebook and LinkedIn!



The side hustle is here!

The age of the side hustle is upon us, says the Henley Business School. We share the latest facts, what this means for you, and some of the ongoing discussion around this topic…

What is a side hustle?

Definitions vary but, according to ‘The Side Hustle Economy’ white paper, this counts as any “small business or secondary job that someone has taken in addition their main career.”

The motivations for taking such a path may range from sheer enjoyment or longer-term career ambition to a financial imperative.

How much of an impact are these side jobs having?

  • 25% of UK adults have adopted some form of a second job.
  • Here in the South-West, this figure increases to 27% of adults. The region shares ‘joint 3rd place’ with the East and West Midlands (while the North East is in first place at 30%, followed by Greater London at 29%).
  • The trend is contributing to a total income of £72 billion throughout the UK alone.
  • Of all the age groups studied, it’s people aged 25-34 who are driving most of the movement (37%).
  • The number of side workers may be set to double within the decade.

Businesses are also taking notice:

  • 80% of companies no longer perceive the ‘9-5 job’ as the standard.
  • 63% additionally believe employers will need to adapt to this change to ensure they retain their best team members.
  • That said, only 49% of companies have initiated any form of side-working policy. While even fewer (47%) believe enabling this trend will ‘attract the best talent’.

HR leaders say side hustle policies will become essential…

A number of HR leaders have discussed this topic, encouraging companies to get prepared and implement policies. They warn that a reluctance to do this could actually result in more staff leaving sooner.

It is argued that employees will eventually leave their jobs anyway and that it’s better to have staff that are engaged and happy while at work.

Another article on this subject has already received mixed comments over on HR Magazine. Several commentators attest those employees with a side hustle express a valuable skill set and positive attitude, and have been more focused at work. Others think this trend is nothing more than a survival strategy to make ends meet and that second jobs can lead to exhaustion and mistake-making.

And from the employee perspective?

Again, the response is mixed. While many feel excited and inspired by this movement, others are wary. Writing for Refinery29, Kate Bishop has called for people not to ‘normalise the side hustle’, highlighting the way work challenges may be doing more to drive the trend than the pursuit of the perfect job or lifestyle.

Bishop raises the issues of job dissatisfaction and career change fears. She highlights the number of people struggling to make ends meet versus the few ‘champagne-popping twenty-somethings with their own beauty lines.’

What about you?

If you’re considering setting up a side job, there’s plenty to think about. Your current work contract should be one of the first things to consider, as you don’t want to do anything to jeopardise your relationship with your employer. Crunch has an excellent article on this subject. As does the Money Advice Service.

You may also want to ask yourself what appeals about the second job. If it comes from a feeling of necessity, could there be a better day job for you? Further reading: a post for anyone craving a career change in addition to our essential job search tips.

From the business perspective, it’s worth swotting up on this topic to inform your business decisions. A proactive approach can be a powerful staff attraction and retention tool. Not to mention a major help in staying ahead in such a rapidly changing business and employment era.

We welcome your thoughts on the positives and pitfalls of the side hustle. You’ll find us on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn



Supporting workers in their over-50s

Employees in their over-50s appear in several news items this week. The question is, are they getting enough support?

You may have heard about Gail Smith, the 52-year-old Newcastle-based businesswoman who took voluntary redundancy last year. At the time, she thought it would be simple to handpick her next role. After all, she has decades of experience at a senior management level. However (and as what the Recruiting Times calls her ‘LinkedIn rant’ would attest!), this has been far from the case. One year on and Gail is actively seeking a role.

Are over-50s workers being discriminated against?

Of course, we cannot comment on the specifics of this particular instance. Yet the article describes a time in which Smith is told she was considered ‘too old’ for an interviewing role. If this is the case, it would be more than frowned upon under the rules of the Equality Act 2010.

What about being told ‘you’re overqualified?’

This is another reason Gail Smith has been given for her interview rejections. This is a separate issue in many respects. A younger worker can also be considered ‘overqualified’ if they have work experiences and qualifications greater than those that the role demands.

It is a tricky situation to be in. Let’s also consider the employer’s needs a mo. Businesses are understandably reluctant to hire someone who they think may be utterly bored or using a vacancy as a stopgap for something better. Although this may not be the case from the employee’s perspective. See below!

So, what can workers do to overcome this issue?

It’s important to communicate why you’re looking for vacancies that appear below your skill-set. Your recruitment consultant should be able to assist you with this. Perhaps there’s a good reason you want to take a step back from previous responsibilities. Explain this as clearly as you can.

Employers may also want to take a second look at the CVs in their inboxes. In times of a skills shortage, nobody wants to be overlooking someone great based on assumptions alone. The best recruitment consultants are experts at seeing which people make the best ‘fit’, should you benefit from some support.

Use your CV wisely.

Returning to the risk of age discrimination, we’d recommend that job applicants take a closer look at their CV. Remove your date of birth, education dates and any long-ago CV details that don’t add anything to your search. E.g. that part-time job you had 30 years or so ago. Keep things fresh and relevant. This is something many agencies will automatically do prior to submitting your CV to a client to ensure you’re judged on merit.

Also, make sure you’re up-to-date with the latest CV methods. It shouldn’t be a one-size-fits-all for every job application. Rather, you should be tailoring your CV to demonstrate exactly how you suit each job you’re applying for. You’ll find some great advice regarding this here.

We naturally wish Gail, and anyone else in her position, the very best with their job search. Hoping the right opportunity presents itself very soon.

A final note for businesses on the ability to support the over-50s worker…

Personnel Today has reported that over half of this age group feels unsupported at work. Yet they also feel more confident in their abilities and skill-sets than some of their younger colleagues.

May we also remind you that more than 2/5 of workers intend to work beyond 65 for reasons other than financial need.

By learning to better support the over-50s employee, you’re at a competitive advantage. An advantage that is so valuable during this ongoing skills shortage.

Looking for additional recruitment support and advice? Call the office on 01225 313130.



Fewer applications per job vacancy!

The nation is receiving fewer applications per job vacancy than ever before, according to the latest research. So, what does this mean for you as a job-seeker or business?

The national averages…

Only 0.38 applications were made per role in the UK this June. Naturally, this means that a number of openings haven’t received any applications whatsoever.

It appears that there is a regional disparity, with employers in Sunderland receiving 3.22 applications across this period. Cambridge saw the lowest level (0.06).

Unfortunately, we cannot see any figures for the Bath area.

Fewer applications: as a job-seeker

Think this sounds like good news? On the whole, you’re right! Employers should have more of an opportunity to consider your CV for the role that you’re applying for.

However (and unfortunately!), you’re not guaranteed the job. Businesses remain understandably selective about the skills and experience that they require.

So you also need to stay selective. Plus, you must ensure that your application is well tailored to each vacancy. Fortunately, we have 7 days of tips to help you with each of these elements!

Also recommended: how to beat procrastination in your job search. Helping you can take advantage of this record low level of competition while it remains.

Fewer applications: as a manager or employer

Half of UK businesses are expressing candidate attraction concerns, yet there are multiple actions that you can take. Scroll to the bottom of this UK skills shortage guide for some essential suggestions.

For some expert recruitment support, and to discuss any staff attraction concerns, please call the office on 01225 313130.

Also recommended: our latest guide to realistic staff rewards. Each candidate attraction tool is all the more valuable at this time.

[Source: Personnel Today]



Beat procrastination: in your job search

Procrastination holding up your job search once again? Let’s face it, we’ve all been there at one stage or another! The good news is that there are a variety of tricks that can help get you back on track…

Seven simple ways to beat job search procrastination:

1) Take 10

  • Dedicate the next 10 minutes to doing something positive for your job search; whatever that might be. Once the ten minutes are up, feel free to switch to another task. You’ll often find that once you get started you’ll actually want to keep going.
  • Ideally, pick the same 10 minutes each day so this soon becomes a habit.

2) The break-down

  • Work out what you need to do to achieve your goals. Break these down into simple achievable steps. For instance…
    • See what’s out there: research recruitment agencies in my sector; read job specs.
    • Update my CV: take note of what I want to include; edit CV; make any additional copies for different types of jobs; tweak for any specific job applications.
    • Contact recruitment agencies: register my CV; list any calls, emails and/or visits as needed.
    • Reply to messages: return phone messages and emails each day.
  • Now prioritise what’s most important and use your ten minutes for this.
  • If everything is of equal note (e.g. there isn’t a pressing call to return), pick anything from your list just to get you started.
  • Where possible, set deadlines for your remaining tasks – and some reminders if needed!

3) Minimise distractions

  • Take your job search to a different location if you need to. Shut yourself away in a quiet room if this suits; as long as you won’t then feel more able to give in to any interruptions. Replying to messages from friends, cleaning the house, and deciding it’s suddenly time to do a workout are all forms of procrastination however you try to frame them!
  • Work out where you feel the most productive. Again, this can just be for a brief spell before returning to your friends/family/partner/life!

4) Note your ‘why’

  • Write down a sentence or a few that describes why you’re trying to find a new job. Are you looking for a fresh challenge, industry experience, a better salary, a more enjoyable working environment, career progression? Be as descriptive as you can and look at this for a moment or two each day before you get going on your job search tasks.

5) Seek accountability

  • If you still can’t beat your procrastination gremlins, ask someone else to help you. They can assist by allocating tasks and setting goals – and by checking in to make sure you’re hitting them!

6) Line up a reward

  • Managed to do your daily 10 (or, even better, more than)? Allow yourself a block of reward time to relax and do something you enjoy.

7) Easy wins

  • Let the latest job alerts come to you by following your recruitment agency on Twitter and LinkedIn! Click through to those that catch your eye and then flick through other job specs in your field.
  • You’ll be hitting that 10 in no time!

Looking for more job search advice? Read our 7 days of insider tips to supercharge your search



Craving a career change!

Career change is on almost half of the nation’s minds, according to the London School of Business & Finance (LSBF)…

The LSBF Careers Report aims to answer one key question: ‘are UK professionals looking to change careers?’ Yet it also goes much further into exploring the feelings that underpin career change, and the blocks that are currently preventing it.

For reference, a career change goes beyond a regular job switch and enters the realms of a new job sector/industry/arena in which you have little to no prior experience.

TIP: already know you want to make your own career change? Read on for a link to our top career change advice post!

Career change hopefuls: how do you compare?

Looking to make the change:

  • 47% of workers would like to switch careers.
  • This figure rises to 66% among millennials (those aged 18-34).
  • 23% of people actually ‘regret’ their present career.
  • Again, this stat rises to 30% for younger workers (in this case, people aged 25-34).
  • It falls to 19% for the over-55 category.
  • Statistically, this means that if you remove the over-55 category from the pool, more than half of workers crave career change (56%).

As for regional differences…

  • Cardiff is the most satisfied city, with 68% of its respondents reporting career contentment.
  • The South-West mirrors the UK average, with 47% of workers craving a change.
  • Glasgow is the least content, with 58% desiring change.
  • Perhaps surprisingly, Londoners are in second (least satisfied) place at 55%.

Why do people want to change career?

  • Increased salary offerings are attracting most workers (39% for all and 54% for millennials).
  • Yet it’s work-life balance that’s most appealing to workers aged 35 to 44 (37%).
  • 34% are seeking greater job satisfaction.
  • 14% desire increased ‘status’.
  • Workers aged over 55 are most drawn to increased salaries (24%) or work-life balance (21%).

When will people make the change?

  • 54% of millennials hope to do so within two years or sooner; 26% say within the coming year.
  • Looking at all age groups, most people are unsure as to when this will happen (31%).
  • Sadly, more than 1/4 (28%) don’t think they ever will be able to do so.
  • 15% feel more hopeful, thinking they could make a career change within 12 months.

What’s stopping people from making their career change happen?

  • 38% of workers aren’t making the move as they’re simply satisfied with their existing job.
  • 29% of people see ‘financial insecurity’ as their primary block. 41% of millennials report this concern.
  • 20% say they don’t know which career they’d switch to.
  • Fear of failure is the primary block for 15% of respondents.
  • While 14% can’t do so due to family or social life disruptions.

Behind the stats

LSBF drew some interesting points from their analysis and we’d encourage you to read the report if you get the chance.

They attribute the increasing confidence towards career changes to the ‘solid growth’ that has been observed in the jobs market over the past few years.

Dr Steve Priddy, the LSBF Director of Research and Academic Dean, is excited to see the drive expressed by the younger demographic. Priddy remarks “it is one of my greatest pleasures to see young people interested in breaking barriers and trying and achieving more for themselves. From my perspective, what is important before any major career move is to ensure you are appropriately qualified to take on the new role and to understand the sector well enough in order to make the most of potential opportunities and to navigate the system as if an insider”.

Working towards your career change…

May we remind you that some of the most successful people have indeed made major career changes after the age of 30 (and well beyond!).

As Priddy suggests, a successful switch takes a smart approach. Our career change FAQ offers some expert insights to get you started.