The most motivated age

When do employees reach their most motivated age? And what’s wrong with these sorts of findings?

The Independent’s latest careers news headline caught our eye. It states that ‘people are most driven aged 33.’ The article, based on research by Bupa Health Clinics, suggests that this is the age when people are likely to be more motivated, confident, energetic and positive.

This apparently applies to all of our goals from career intentions to healthy lifestyle plans. While the article and research are clearly well-intentioned, it’s important to note that these findings are also highly generalised and don’t reflect other research data.

Earlier studies have found that it’s the over-55s employee who is the most motivated. Plus it’s likely that we’ll soon hear Gen Z is leading the way on this front!

In reality…

There are extremely motivated individuals of every working age. Working closely with candidates across all career stages has shown us this time and time again.

Fear not if you’re only just embarking on your career and want to prove your motivation – or if 33 is a long distant memory – your individual drive can peak at any time. What’s more, there’s nothing to say you’ll only have one peak in your career.

What motivates you?

More detailed studies have suggested that the drivers that motivate employees may change throughout the career cycle.

For instance, older workers may be more inspired by roles that feature ‘autonomy and personal principles’ whereas younger employees may desire greater ‘competition and career progression.’

Even these drivers will naturally vary individually. With all this in mind, there are a few important questions to consider…

  • How motivated do you feel right now?
  • What actually motivates you?
  • And is there anything you need to change to increase your motivation at this career stage?

One example change is finding others to support you – something said to help 70% of respondents in the first survey piece.

A new opportunity may also prove to be an important driver for you.



4 signs you’ve found (or are) the right candidate!

How to know whether you’ve found (or are!) the right candidate for the job – a post for employers and job-seekers…

Last week, Onrec published a post that we knew we had to feature in our January series. It’s titled: ‘Think you’ve found the right candidate? 4 signs every employer should look for.’

While the piece is clearly targeted at employers and HR Managers, it also offers valuable reading for job-seekers. After all, one of the most vital tools in your job search is the ability to understand what businesses are looking for – allowing you to demonstrate your suitability for the role.

Onrec’s advice is perhaps surprisingly simple. You may think that each of these four signs would be a given when attending interviews. However, it’s the people who can do these things particularly well (and most genuinely!) who really stand out.

The 4 signs that you could be the right candidate are…

1. Exuding enthusiasm:

True enthusiasm can really help you set you apart from your competitors. This includes an enthusiasm about your experience to date, alongside the opportunity to bring your experiences into the role you’re discussing. The best bit? The Onrec article highlights how achievable this is, regardless of your interview nerves.

Tip: before attending any interviews, spend some time considering what you’re most enthusiastic and excited about at this point in your career. What’ve you most enjoyed about your previous work and what are you looking forward to doing next? Make notes and discuss with friends if this helps you to become more comfortable in expressing your positivity.

2.  You’ve swotted up:

You need to show that you’ve swotted up on each business you’re interviewing for. This isn’t just about proving you understand the company and its purpose, yet also showing you’re proactive and prepared.

Tip: even if it’s a last-minute interview request, you can have a good look at the company website. Keep a close watch for any mentions of company goals, aims, working ethos or similar. Got longer to prepare? Visit social media feeds, research news items about the company, industry trends and more. This tip also ties into the ‘Proactivity’ point in this post.

3. Seeing flaws as growth opportunities

The most well-rounded candidates can take an honest look at themselves and see how their downfalls can be used as areas of improvement. It helps if you can give real-life examples of times you’ve turned a flaw or failure into a learning and development opportunity.

Tip: try to brainstorm something other than perfectionism (the most popular weakness that’s become something of an interview cliche!). Think of a challenge you’ve overcome, which trait this represented, and how you overcame it and/or the steps you’re currently taking to improve. Again, express enthusiasm for your personal development rather than shame for being human in the first place!

4. Communicating well

Onrec’s final point also ties in well with the ‘Empathy’ trait in this article. You want to communicate clearly and positively with every person you encounter throughout your recruitment process.

This goes beyond your interview conversations and extends into any emails, calls and/or texts you exchange. Not to mention those non-verbal communications with anyone you pass in the interview building.

Tip: always give yourself space to re-read any written comms before firing them off to a prospective employer. You can also stand out by sending interview thank you notes – here’s some advice on how to do this if you’re working with a recruitment agency.

Catch up with the rest of our January series so far…

Don’t forget to keep popping back to our News page to see the latest instalments. You can also connect with us via Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn



Do you need a career plan?

What would you say if someone asked you to outline your career plan? Are you the sort of person who can give a step by step account of the coming five years? Perhaps you’d struggle to outline the next five months! The question is, does it even matter either way?

If you’ve attended any interviews recently, you’re highly likely to have been asked some form of the career plan question.

For instance:

  • Where do you see yourself in the next year/five years/ten years?
  • What are your goals for the next year/five years/ten years?
  • What are your longer-term career goals?
  • What’s your dream job?
  • Tell me more about your career hopes or aspirations?
  • What are your future goals?
  • Where do you see yourself in your career and what’s next for you?

The wording is different yet the core meaning is the same. The interviewer is trying to establish your intentions, including how likely you are to commit to the opening they’re recruiting for.

They’re also attempting to gauge your level of ambition. Depending on the job role and company set up, they may hope to see that you’re open to internal development opportunities. Conversely, they may be trying to make sure you’re not planning to climb the ranks far sooner than they’d be able to accommodate!

How to answer this sort of interview question:

Before we return to the main focus of our post (namely, whether career plans really matter!), we want to share this blog post from The Balance Careers. It contains some fantastic tips on how to answer these interview questions, with example answers to help you hone yours.

Now back to those career plans. Do you really need one?

To quote Melody Wilding, writing for Forbes, “you can move forward confidently in your career without a five-year plan. You can still be successful while doing it from a place of agility and resiliency, not pushing and forcing.”

Yes, this is excellent news for anyone who struggles to map out their future! That said, there are also some useful insights to make any existing career plans more effective.

Summarising some key points from Wilding’s feature:

  • None of us can predict our future – and that includes our future priorities and opportunities.
  • If you’re overly focused on one set plan, you may reject ‘important opportunities.’
  • You may see setbacks as failures and stop trying.
  • All in all, you may end up feeling ‘stuck’ in your career.

How to plan more effectively:

The above isn’t to say you shouldn’t consider your future plans at all. Wilding recommends:

  • Questioning whether the career path you’re on is your own or someone else’s (i.e. are you actually pursuing someone else’s idea of success? That someone else could be a boss, former teacher, partner, friend, family member…)
  • Questioning any ‘shoulds’ that crop up. For instance, saying you should pursue a promotion in your current line of work or you should want to gain managerial experience.
  • Considering the shorter term. What do you see yourself changing or not changing in the coming year?
  • Taking a more experimental approach; allowing yourself to make small changes that you can continually adapt and respond to, rather than pursuing a rigid five-year plan.
  • ‘Reframing failure as feedback’ and looking at what you’ve learned from the situation and what you can do next.
  • Reviewing your plans on a regular basis to make sure they still fit your current intentions.

What to do next:

Why not keep things simple and think about your coming year.

What are your priorities right now? Are there any non-negotiables for your next role? Is there anything that has previously been non-negotiable that you may now be open to?

Work through all of today’s questions in your own time and you’ll be ready for the career plan question…both from yourself and your future interviewers!

A reminder to bookmark, return to and share our News & Advice feed throughout January for more positive new year content. You can also connect with us via Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn