Bath is one of the UK’s most woke cities!

Bath is one of the UK’s most woke cities in which to live and work…

For those less familiar with the term, the word ‘woke’ originates in American slang. The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines this as being “aware of and actively attentive to important facts and issues (especially issues of racial and social justice).”

To this end, it’s often used interchangeably with other words that describe progressive attitudes and behaviours.

How do you measure a city’s woke status?

Bankrate has ranked 50 cities across seven specific categories, which include:

  1. Google search trends: how frequently the city’s web users have searched for the followings terms over a 5-year period:  ‘LGBT’, ‘Fair Trade’, ‘Volunteering’, ‘Climate Change’, ‘Feminism’, ‘Protest’, ‘Sustainability’, ‘Charity’, ‘Human Rights’ and ‘Politics’.
  2. The gender pay gap: the disparity between wages for men and women.
  3. Recycling rates: the quantity of household waste that is recycled.
  4. Voter turnout: comparing ‘the size of each electorate with the total number of votes in the 2017 General Election.’
  5. Vegan & vegetarian: from the perspective of a reduced carbon footprint; counting the number of exclusively vegan and vegetarian eating establishments.
  6. ULEV registration: the number of vehicles registered as ‘ultra-low emission’, which usually refers to ‘electric or hybrid cars.’
  7. Council diversity: exploring the representation of women and minority groups in local government.

Full details of each category and data sources can be found on the Bankrate site.

How progressive is Bath?

Bath is officially the third most woke city in which to live and work, according to this assessment scale. The city receives a total score of 22.31.

Only Oxford and Brighton & Hove achieve greater progressiveness scores, reaching 23.82 and 23.33 respectively.

Bath performs especially well for its:

  1. Recycling rates: achieving a score of 4.6/5. This surpasses Oxford’s 4.2 and Brighton’s 2.4.
  2. Vegan/vegetarian establishments: 4.5/5. Brighton achieves a perfect 5 for this aspect, however, Oxford falls behind with 3.5.
  3. Voter turnout: 3.9/5. Mirroring Oxford (3.9) and only just behind Brighton (4).
  4. ULEV registration: 3.7/5. Beating Brighton’s 2.6 and scoring only marginally less than Oxford’s 3.8. 

However, Bath still needs to work on its:

  1. Council Diversity: 0.6/5: the city’s weakest ranking. Oxford and Brighton, however, each only achieve scores around 2/5 for this element. Wolverhampton, in contrast, receives a 4.3.
  2. Gender Pay Gap: 2/5: this was a low-scoring area for each of the top three cities. None of which even reach a 3/5. Swansea, however, receives an impressive 4.1/5 for its minimal pay gap.
  3. Google Search Trends: 3.1/5: Bath residents and professionals could use the Internet for more progressive means! Brighton & Hove achieves its second perfect score (5/5) for this aspect, yet Oxford also has work to do with its 3.4.

Interestingly, if it wasn’t for the Council Diversity ranking, Bath (21.8) would beat both Oxford (21.4) and Brighton & Hove (21.3). Please note: we haven’t totted up the scores for the rest of the cities to see how else the rankings would change.

Want to work in a woke city?!

We’re proud to have recruited for businesses in Bath and the surrounding area since 1999. You’ll find the latest local job openings listed here.



More holidays and a pay rise

The New Economics Foundation is calling for more holidays and a pay rise for the good of the British economy!

This recommendation (and its accompanying report) focuses on ways in which to improve national productivity.

The idea being that if consumers are able to spend more money, and have more time in which to spend it, the demand for products and services will increase. This, in turn, will help bolster business productivity and the wider economy.

Do we need more holidays?

Few employees would decline the opportunity to have more time off. Especially on hearing that Britons receive fewer public holidays than many of their European counterparts.

While the UK minimum stands at 28 days, EU employees receive anywhere from 30 to 40 paid public holidays each year.

This report also reflects employees’ priorities, according to a separate study

When looking for a new job, British people prioritise:

  1. Their salary (98%)
  2. Holiday allowance (91%)
  3. A pension plan (89%)
  4. Promotion opportunities (78%)

Talking of holidays…

Therefore, while the ideas sound welcome, there may be additional issues to tackle in practise! In the meantime, don’t forget to use your jobs research as a chance to review your personal priorities. 



Perks & pay: for employees earning less than £30K.

What’s more important, perks or pay for employees earning less than £30,000 a year? 

If you keep your eye on the jobs news, you’ll spot a common theme. Researchers always want to know more about your working values and how these compare to each other. The perennial question tends to include ‘what matters more to you, your salary or your…!’ (As a case in point, we recently reported on the topic of company culture versus salary level.)

Today’s source specifically explores the parity of the work benefits package and salary for the ‘under £30,000 workforce’.

Perks or pay?

In this instance, the title suggests that they’re ‘just as important’ as each other – and many of the employees surveyed place more weight on other work-life benefits.

  • 45% of respondents are happier when offered learning and development opportunities
  • 36% value flexible working hours, including ‘leniency in start times and/or breaks’
  • 26% already enjoy non-typical work schedules
  • ‘Frequency of pay’ is briefly mentioned as an additional motivator
  • Candidates are also eager to source jobs local to home (27%)

The income issue:

This sample explores the ‘Hidden Heroes’ workforce: those who earn an average salary of £16,403. This comprises employees in multiple sectors and across a variety of working ages.

So, from the above findings, you may think this group just isn’t as reliant on their income. However, many of the respondents express financial concerns.

  • Over 1/3 are ‘unsure or worried’ about covering their general bills
  • While 72% do not think they’d be able to fund ‘a large unexpected’ payment
  • Alongside this, 54% of this employee group report feeling ‘underpaid’
  • Millennials most often relate to feeling ‘overqualified’ (45%) for their roles
  • And the hospitality and catering industries contain the greatest number of workers who feel overqualified (54%)

What this tells us…

Employers looking to attract candidates for openings of this salary level would be smart to explore their wider benefits packages. What else could be offered to motivate and incentivise employees? Small changes could prove invaluable to professionals.

Naturally, extending benefit schemes across the entire workforce helps companies to maintain a competitive advantage.

For further recruitment advice, please call the office on 01225 313130. 



Forced into side hustles

Why do employees opt to work in so-called side hustles? Is it by choice or is there something else forcing their decisions?

If you read our recent salary news roundup, you’ll know that more than 1/2 of professionals are finding it difficult to meet their financial needs on a monthly basis.

So, it’s of little wonder that the majority of people who undertake side jobs are motivated by the chance to earn more money.

The top motivations for side hustles are:

  1. To increase income (59.9%)
  2. For personal enjoyment (14.1%)
  3. To ‘improve a hobby’ (10.4%)
  4. For better job security (9.4%)
  5. Or to enter a new career (6.3%)

The fact that 67.7% of respondents could be willing to stop their side jobs if their employer increased their salary adds further proof of their financial incentive.

That said, the remaining 1/3 of respondents intend to eventually turn their side gig into their career role.

Should employees and/or their employers be concerned?

There are important considerations for all parties…

  • As the Onrec post suggests, employees should have a good look at their employment contracts before embarking on any side jobs. Many businesses place restrictions on work that can be completed out of office hours.
  • Naturally, employers need to promote productivity and will be concerned if their team members turn up unreasonably tired or distracted. There’s also the chance of competitive overlaps and even public relation problems.
  • Yet, as the piece also mentions, businesses need to do more to attract and retain their employees; particularly in a time of continued skills shortage. Where possible, increased salaries can help professionals to better balance their work and home needs.
  • Business leaders can consult their recruitment agencies for more guidance on achieving competitive and attractive salary packages. We’re delighted to assist local employers with their recruitment enquiries – please call the office on 01225 313130 for more information.
  • Employees who feel overwhelmed with balancing extra work alongside their careers should consider whether their day job is the right role for them. If they’re not able to negotiate a salary increase, they may find their earning potential is greater in a new role. Regularly reviewing local job opportunities can help you to gauge your salary potential.


The best work-life balance jobs (+ salary details!)

Exploring which jobs have the best work-life balance scores – and whether you’ll have to pick between your lifestyle or your salary…

As each Monday rolls around, you may find yourself wishing your weeks featured less work and more leisure. It’s a common wish and one that often appears to involve a level of financial sacrifice.

After all (and as Recruiting Times reports), this choice often entails a shorter working week and/or part-time hours, which often spells reduced pay.

Well, the latest research by Glassdoor has identified the 15 best roles for work-life balance, with 13 of these meeting or exceeding the national salary average.

The top 10 work-life balance jobs are…

Please note: the brackets indicate the standard national base salary for each role.

  1. Sales Development Representative (£27,000)
  2. Research fellow (£34,000)
  3. Customer Success Manager (£40,000)
  4. Marketing Assistant (£20,000)
  5. Engagement Manager (£48,000)
  6. Data Scientist (£46,000)
  7. Recruiter (£25,000)
  8. Copywriter (£29,000)
  9. Web Developer (£31,000)
  10. Audit Manager (£52,000)

The complete job list and associated ratings can be found in the original post.

Using these findings…

We agree with the positive sentiments expressed in the piece. These findings show that you don’t always have to sacrifice your salary level in order to achieve a more favourable working lifestyle.

What’s more, as Glassdoor suggests, the vast majority of the roles listed can be found in a variety of working sectors and industries.

As ever, we encourage you to do your research to gain more of an understanding of what’s realistic for you to achieve locally. Regularly visiting our jobs page will allow you to see the salaries offered in a variety of different roles.

Your career choices are also highly individual. One person’s ideal work-life balance may be quite different from another’s. Plus what suits you at one point in your career can change with time. Where possible, seek to understand what matters to you…and let your recruitment consultant know your job search priorities!



The latest salary news

Sharing four of the latest salary news findings. How many of these ongoing issues can you relate to?

1) The monthly money struggle

Source: onrec

  • The majority of people (64%) are working beyond their contractual hours. Yet more than half of employees (55.1%) are struggling to meet their financial needs at the end of each working month.
  • Respondents are working anywhere from £1,607.08 to £12,045.60 of unpaid overtime each year.
  • Still, most workers (61.8%) are entering their overdrafts before the month is out, while almost 1/3 of respondents (32.2%) are unable to clear their credit card on a monthly basis.
  • In addition, 74.9% of people think they’re currently underpaid for their job role.

2) Working in insecure, low-paid positions

Source: Personnel Today

  • It can’t help matters that 1 in 6 UK employees are undertaking ‘insecure, low-paid’ jobs.
  • This accounts for 5.1 million people; 2 million of which are working parents.
  • Younger workers are most affected. That said, 46% of those working insecure, low-paid roles are over the age of 35.
  • As a result, the Living Wage Foundation has launched a new campaign titled ‘Living Hours’. This calls for organisations to pay the ‘real Living Wage’ as well as committing to advance notice for shift workers, more accurate contracts, and minimum working hours.

3) The over-30s still require financial support

Source: HR News

  • With the above findings in mind, it’s little surprise that many employees aged over 30 are still asking for financial help from their parents.
  • This age group is the most likely to request financial support (45%).
  • 42% of parents also admit to diving into their ‘own savings and disposable income’ to provide support, even though this may affect their own financial security in the future.
  • We’re not talking small sums either. 1 in 5 parents has contributed more than £11,000, with 1 in 10 giving more than £21,000 to fund large purchases, such as cars and homes.
  • The top 10 purchases that are being funded by parents are listed here.

4) The fear of asking for a pay rise

Source: HR News

  • Despite the prevalence of financial concerns, more than 1/2 of employees are afraid to ask for a pay rise.
  • Some people don’t know how to phrase their requests (16%), others don’t want to appear greedy (15%),  or are ‘scared of asking the boss’ (12%) or simply worry they’ll be ‘turned down’ (12%).
  • Although, 37% of people feel so confident in requesting a pay rise that ‘nothing would stop them’ from doing so.

Salary tip: regularly researching local jobs in your sector will help you to gauge whether you’re receiving (and/or paying your team!) a competitive salary. 



Is your salary the most important factor?

Investigating whether your salary is the most important of all the job benefits. What else appeals to today’s job-seekers and what’s so important about this research?

Let’s start with the importance of this topic. As we mentioned in our last post, job vacancy numbers have reached an all-time high. This means that each employer has to work all the harder to impress suitable applicants.

This also means that there are regular surveys to ascertain which factors are most likely to attract a candidate into a new role. Surveys such as the one behind the ‘Attracting the Right Talent – Meeting Demands through the Job Offering Report.’

Salary isn’t (necessarily!) the most important factor…

  • At present, just over 1/3 of the nation’s professionals say their ‘career expectations are not being met’. They most prioritise…
  • Working for an employer that ‘values you’ (25%)
  • The opportunity to gain experience (17%)
  • Creating a strong work-life balance (18%)
  • And developing personal technical skills and abilities (11%)

Those that had worked for their employer for more than five years were even more likely to rate feeling valued and work-life balance as most important.

Alongside this, 60% of people prioritise the chance to develop their career within their job role.

You’ll see salary is yet to be mentioned. However, there is some regional variation here. In the South, workers are more likely to prioritise the career and lifestyle factors mentioned. Whereas the majority of professionals in the North East and Midlands valued their salary above all else.

There’s also some sector difference. The banking and financial services industry was the only sector that specifically regarded a pay rise as their primary career priority.

The report says there’s been a marked shift in attitudes due to the ‘millennial impact’. This group of workers is placing greater importance on lifestyle elements beyond pay rates.

What does this all mean?

We can see that attitudes are changing. However, it’s not long ago we heard that the UK is more salary-minded than any other European country and that 62% of people primarily work for this reason.

It’s worth considering the research as a whole. Salaries are incredibly important to many workers, yet there are also plenty of other factors that are relevant to job searching…and the acceptance of job offers.

  • As a candidate: it’s useful to consider your own priorities. What matters most in your career right now? Be sure to let your Recruitment Consultant know what you’re looking for. You can include some of this information right from your first email to your agency.
  • As an employer: take a look at your employee attraction offering. Are you making your team feel valued, do you help to create a positive work-life balance, and are you ensuring your staff receives regular skills development? What’s more, are you communicating these messages in your job advertisements? This post will help you to sharpen your employee attraction strategy.

For specialist recruitment support, please call the office on 01225 313130. Further details are available on our Contact page



Money worries at work

Are money worries affecting your work? You might not associate financial concerns with recruitment discussions, however, this very topic has become an increasing news theme over recent months…

Most employees experience money worries.

But what does this all have to do with recruitment?

Working towards solutions…

  • This issue presents both a challenge and an opportunity. The more that these discussions take place, the more likely employers are to find ways of supporting their team. While the most innovative companies can make this another staff attraction and retention differentiator.
  • Professionals will also feel less alone in their money worries. Anyone who has concerns that they are unable to discuss with their employer would be wise to contact the Money Advice Service. This is a free, impartial service.
  • On a separate note, if you’ve never really got to grips with your payslip and tax code, this post should help.
  • If you’re wondering whether you could earn more for your career experience and skill-set, speak with your Recruitment Consultant. Regularly researching jobs in your industry can also improve your knowledge of the going market rates.