A promotion without a pay rise?

Would you accept a promotion without a pay rise? Professionals in certain sectors are more likely to do this…

This is the first in our Vanquis Bank ‘Professional Gripes Survey’ series. The survey is a nationwide office study exploring ‘what makes UK workers tick and what ticks them off!’

For many people, the whole purpose of a promotion is that it allows them to step up the career ladder and increase their salary in the process.

Yet what if you were offered the bigger job title without the bigger salary?

  • 20.5% of British employees would definitely say yes to this.
  • 36.6% are sure they’d say no.
  • However, the largest group at 42.9%, would take the time to consider this offer further.

Professionals in certain job sectors are more likely to jump in with a definite yes. These include those working within:

  1. Marketing (58%)
  2. Agriculture & Environment (46%)
  3. Beauty & Wellbeing (44%)
  4. Art & Design (39%)
  5. IT & Digital Telecoms (29%)
  6. Media (24%)
  7. Construction (22%)
  8. Customer Services & Retail (20%)
  9. Science & Mathematics (20%)
  10. Security & Emergency Services (20%)

At the other end of the scale, only 11% of people working in legal or political services and 9% of those in hospitality would respond with a yes.

So, why would you accept a promotion without a pay rise?

This is perhaps the most interesting of all the questions. Not to mention the most important for anyone considering making or accepting such an offer.

  • The greatest incentive is the belief that this will help ‘secure a better job in the future’ (68.6%). Other responses included…
  • To have a greater ‘authority over colleagues’ (23.1%)
  • And to impress a ‘date or loved one’ (9.9%).

Perhaps this is why those in Marketing are so much more likely to say yes than other industry professionals – they understand the power of perception that the new job title can offer.

How are employees achieving their promotions?

This is where things get really worrying. While most respondents simply accept additional work in a bid to impress their seniors (32.5%), others are taking far less honourable routes, including…

  • Complimenting senior colleagues and/or bosses (25.1%)
  • And even flirting with them (12.9%) or wearing suggestive clothing (11.10%), which makes for alarming reading in a post-#MeToo world.
  • What’s more, some have admitted to sabotaging their closest working rivals (10%), bribery (9.6%) and blackmail (9.6%).

Across all categories, male employees were more likely to push for a promotion.

Of course, this is a national study conducted across a real range of sectors. Meaning the findings may not reflect what’s happening locally and/or in your industry.

Thankfully, the vast majority of people know that good quality work is the best way to garner a promotion.

Should you consider a promotion without a pay rise?

In some cases, this can be a savvy move when considering your longer-term job prospects. There’s certainly some truth behind the idea that a better job title can improve your future job opportunities.

Previous findings suggest that job titles do matter and can form a core part of your benefits package.

Naturally, you also need to consider your financial situation. If the improved job title comes with a salary cut, or you know that you’re unable to commit to the new role for a reasonable time, you’d be wise to rethink things.

It’s also worth staying on top of your local research. See how much other employers are paying for people in your prospective new role. You may find that you can negotiate a slight pay rise or that there are alternative opportunities that offer promotions in both job title and salary level.



Leaving a job without another job?!

Have you ever left a job without another job at the ready? Would you consider doing so? We explore which professionals are most likely to say ‘yes’ to these questions and share some advice…

While still among the minority, more than 1 in 10 British employees (13%) are willing to leave their current job without having their next job lined up.

It appears that certain groups of professionals are more likely to take a risk. These include:

  1. PR and Marketing (22%)
  2. Sales personnel (21.7%)
  3. Manual labourers (18.9%)
  4. Retail employees (18.8%)
  5. Civil servants (17.7%)
  6. Accounts professionals (17.7%)
  7. Lawyers (17.6%)
  8. Teachers (17.2%)
  9. Operations employees (17%)
  10. And Finance professionals (16.1%)

The researchers also found that:

  • Employees aged 25 to 34 are among the most prepared to leave a role without another job at the ready.
  • Those in the 55 to 64-year-old age group are the least likely to do this.
  • Men are more likely to take a risk without knowing what they’re doing next.
  • However, women are marginally more prepared to leave their current job if they do know what they are going to do.

Should you take the risk and leave your job without another job at the ready?

  • In the vast majority of cases, the answer to this question is no! The jobs market is naturally unpredictable. Even with a wealth of experience and a wonderful personality, you may struggle to secure work as quickly as you hope. Especially if you work within a competitive industry.
  • By commencing your job search alongside your current role, you can enjoy your increased financial security while maintaining a ‘consistent’ CV.
  • There are, of course, some special circumstances. For instance, if you’re in the highly fortunate position of being able to financially support yourself for a potentially extended period of time. Even in this case, it’s advisable to follow Forbes’ approach – only take the leap if you have some sort of plan lined up. Even if this plan involves taking a break to travel, volunteer, study or take some ‘dedicated time for your job search.’
  • There are also occasions in which you won’t have much choice, for instance through redundancy, relocation and similar. In these times, specialist advice becomes all the more valuable. Seek out REC-accredited recruitment agencies that cater to your industry. We have long been proud members!
  • Remember, recruiters and employers pay close attention to your CV. It’s worth detailing your career breaks and any associated skills and achievements. For instance, courses undertaken to further your industry credentials, voluntary experiences, etc.
  • Temping can also enhance your CV through these periods, as well as introducing you to a variety of local employers/industries. While you can’t guarantee that you will find temp work immediately, employers are often looking for people who are readily available. Due to how quickly temp opportunities are filled, you may not see many temporary opportunities listed at any one time. Your best bet is to submit your CV to a suitable recruitment agency and keep in touch regarding any opportunities.

You can apply for the latest temporary, contract and/or permanent vacancies via our jobs pageCV upload, or by email. Here’s what to include in your cover email for the latter!



A positive recruitment agency relationship

How your recruitment agency relationship affects your job search. Plus the latest news regarding the UK jobs boom…

Your recruitment agency relationship:

HR News has just released some great data surrounding the benefits of working with recruitment agencies. They report that:

  • The majority (64%) of candidates surveyed worked with a recruitment agency to ‘find at least one job’ last year.
  • 88% of people most value the communication received from their agency. This includes support, reassurance and guidance throughout the recruitment process.
  • Around 1/4 of respondents additionally appreciate the prospect of a long-term recruitment agency relationship. They understand how the insights garnered by their consultants can help to support their later career progress.
  • A similar number of people look for specialist recruitment agencies who will understand the intricacies of their industry – and, consequently, provide valuable insights for candidates.
  • Poor agency communications understandably cause job-seekers to utilise alternative routes.
  • However, more than 2/5 of candidates stated that they found their job search ‘easy’.

The UK jobs boom continues…

Over on Recruiting Times, we hear that the UK jobs boom remains in ‘full force’ and that the women’s unemployment rate has reached a record low.

The article, which cites stats from The Office for National Statistics (ONS), reveals:

  • National employment has now reached 32.6 million people.
  • Unemployment fell to 1.36 million – 100,000 fewer people than last year.
  • The women’s unemployment level has dropped below 4% for the first time.
  • Yet, job vacancy numbers have risen by 16,000 to a total of 870,000 jobs. Which is also a record figure – and a sign of the ongoing skills shortage.

It’s interesting to note that zero-hour contracts can also contribute to high employment rates and growth figures. In other words, there may still be many people who are recorded as employed yet not receiving regular work assignments (or, for that matter, a regular income!).

We’d always recommend finding a recruitment agency who specialises in the types of vacancies that you’re searching for. The Recruitment & Employment Confederation offers a handy guide to help you to choose an agency. This includes a member directory, which we’re proud to be a part of.

Working with Appoint:

Did you know we specialise in commercial office jobs in Bath and the surrounding Somerset and Wiltshire areas? We recruit for an array of openings, including (yet not limited to!):

  • Administration
  • Customer services
  • Finance & financial services
  • Sales & marketing
  • Project management
  • IT & technical

This includes everything from temporary assignments to contract bookings and permanent roles.

We opened in 1999, so have garnered a wealth of industry expertise. We’re privileged to be able to share our insights with our candidates and clients throughout the region.

You can learn more about us on our Candidates page. You can also take a look at our jobs page to see and apply for our latest vacancies. We look forward to hearing from you.