The worst management traits

Do you or your business leaders possess any of these worst management traits?

Many managers never really set out to become managers at all. As no doubt you’ve witnessed in your own career, it’s common to simply climb the ranks as new opportunities arise. It’s also common to enter team leadership roles without any formal management training.

Yet, at the same time, we know how valuable effective teams are to successful businesses. Which means it’s also vital to regularly assess our management skills – whether they’re our own or those of our employees.

HRnews has published a post detailing some of the poor management traits to watch out for.

The worst management traits include:

1. Micromanagement

Or becoming overly ‘involved’ in tasks that have been delegated to others. This has negative consequences for all – from wasting the manager’s time to undermining the trust of your employees and/or failing to give them the chance to build skills and confidence.

2. Taking the credit

This is when someone merrily accepts praise for what others have done. There can also be overlaps with not accepting blame for personal mistakes or offering up ‘scapegoats’ to save themselves! This can result in the team failing to present their ideas and/or taking a ‘cover your back’ approach to their work.

3. Hypocrisy

In this case, ‘enforcing rules that the manager fails to follow themselves’. The article offers an example of expecting high timekeeping standards when the manager is routinely late. Of course, this could apply to a whole host of business situations and the results remain the same – it reduces management ‘credibility’.

4. Poor listening skills

It’s not just about listening to employees, yet also the ability to process and respond to their feedback and ideas. The best managers also actively encourage such input. When this is absent, the team may start to doubt their manager’s efficacy.

5. Losing your temper

A short fuse places everyone on edge and can make a team feel wholly uncomfortable. This can lead to a walking-on-eggshells response and generally stunt everyone’s personal development. It can also lead to a culture of fear.

The good news…

  • Even if you identify with some or all of these management traits, you can further develop your skills. Many of the solutions are pleasingly simple, as detailed in the HR News post.
  • What’s more, as you develop your management abilities, you’re likely to generate greater success for your business.
  • Reminder: you don’t automatically have to become a people manager to progress in your career! Sometimes people simply need permission to explore other options.
  • There are plenty of natural team leaders out there and you can prioritise those with proven management experience when recruiting. You can also train your new managers to ensure that they’re continually developing their abilities.
  • If the above describes your manager, and they’re making no efforts to change, what’s to stop you working for a new management team?! Explore the latest local openings today.


A work stress & health special

Reviewing the latest news on work stress and mental health – including some tips to improve yours.

Understanding the research findings can help you make changes to benefit your working life, alongside the lives of those you manage… 

Work stress: who’s feeling it most?

  • Professionals aged 35-44 represent the most stressed employee group, with more than a 1/4 experiencing daily stress. ‘Work, family and children’ are the primary triggers for this age group.
  • HR appears to be the most stressed profession, with 78% of people reporting daily stress.
  • The article also cites the core stressors for the 16 to 24-year-olds and over-55s, alongside other stressed out professions, the effects of this stress, and relaxation strategies.

British adults aren’t sleeping enough

  • One clear stress-relieving strategy is that of obtaining enough sleep on a regular basis. Something that the average British worker fails to do.
  • It doesn’t help that 28% of respondents are kept awake due to the stress caused by their working day.

Poor managers cause a surge in stress-related absence

  • Research suggests that managers require additional training in order to ‘better support staff wellbeing’.
  • 37% of employers have observed higher levels of stress-related absence within the past 12 months – this has been attributed to ‘heavy workloads and poor management’.

Why even gym-goers live sedentary working lifestyles

  • Our sedentary working lives increase the risk of major health issues, including ‘Type 2 Diabetes, heart disease, and cancer.’
  • Being ‘extremely active’ for a short spell in your day, such as a 60-minute gym workout, does not override this risk.
  • Professionals are encouraged to get up every 30 minutes in order to do a ‘short burst of exercise’ such as a 2-minute walk.

Hot desking increases work stress

Managers are missing mental health problems

  • Research from Mind (the leading mental health charity) shows a need for managers to learn ‘how to spot and support colleagues who might be struggling with issues like stress, anxiety or depression‘.
  • More than 7 in 10 employees have encountered a mental health problem at some stage of their life. What’s more, over 1/2 of staff members are experiencing mental health issues right now.

Young professionals believe their commute harms their health

  • More than 2/5 of workers think their commute worsens their stress. However, this figure increases to almost 3/4 (73%) of 25 to 34-year-olds.
  • Despite this, younger employees are additionally most willing to undertake a longer commute in order to obtain a ‘nicer property’.

Let’s look at some positives…

Again, rather than becoming overwhelmed by the volume of work stress headlines, we can all use these findings to our advantage.

We can each look at those factors we have some control over. Whether it’s finding ways to get more sleep, move more during the working day, or reassess our commute. Employers and managers can also look at additional training to improve their understanding of their colleagues’ needs – and how to support them.

In addition, we’ve found a couple of promising headlines…

An extra tip to reduce your work stress

  • Harvard researchers have found one way to turn that commute around and reduce your daily stress levels.
  • Instead of using this time to engage in relaxing pursuits, they suggest commuters should “go through your plan for the day (visualise it), set your goals and priorities, and review the three most important tasks to accomplish.” Participants that achieve this report greater job satisfaction.

Is this the future of workplace health?

  • Perhaps you feel you’re more prone to stress than your colleagues. Well, personalised healthcare could help you identify your genetic challenges.
  • Discovering whether you’re more prone to stress and/or high blood pressure, or whether you’re likely to be triggered by your caffeine intake, could be a major boost to your stress reduction tactics. Could this really contribute towards the future of ‘healthy businesses?’

Of course, we can all reach that point where our work stress largely comes from the need to find a new challenge or fresh environment! You’ll find all the latest jobs listed here.