The worst management traits

Do you or your business leaders possess any of these worst management traits?

Many managers never really set out to become managers at all. As no doubt you’ve witnessed in your own career, it’s common to simply climb the ranks as new opportunities arise. It’s also common to enter team leadership roles without any formal management training.

Yet, at the same time, we know how valuable effective teams are to successful businesses. Which means it’s also vital to regularly assess our management skills – whether they’re our own or those of our employees.

HRnews has published a post detailing some of the poor management traits to watch out for.

The worst management traits include:

1. Micromanagement

Or becoming overly ‘involved’ in tasks that have been delegated to others. This has negative consequences for all – from wasting the manager’s time to undermining the trust of your employees and/or failing to give them the chance to build skills and confidence.

2. Taking the credit

This is when someone merrily accepts praise for what others have done. There can also be overlaps with not accepting blame for personal mistakes or offering up ‘scapegoats’ to save themselves! This can result in the team failing to present their ideas and/or taking a ‘cover your back’ approach to their work.

3. Hypocrisy

In this case, ‘enforcing rules that the manager fails to follow themselves’. The article offers an example of expecting high timekeeping standards when the manager is routinely late. Of course, this could apply to a whole host of business situations and the results remain the same – it reduces management ‘credibility’.

4. Poor listening skills

It’s not just about listening to employees, yet also the ability to process and respond to their feedback and ideas. The best managers also actively encourage such input. When this is absent, the team may start to doubt their manager’s efficacy.

5. Losing your temper

A short fuse places everyone on edge and can make a team feel wholly uncomfortable. This can lead to a walking-on-eggshells response and generally stunt everyone’s personal development. It can also lead to a culture of fear.

The good news…

  • Even if you identify with some or all of these management traits, you can further develop your skills. Many of the solutions are pleasingly simple, as detailed in the HR News post.
  • What’s more, as you develop your management abilities, you’re likely to generate greater success for your business.
  • Reminder: you don’t automatically have to become a people manager to progress in your career! Sometimes people simply need permission to explore other options.
  • There are plenty of natural team leaders out there and you can prioritise those with proven management experience when recruiting. You can also train your new managers to ensure that they’re continually developing their abilities.
  • If the above describes your manager, and they’re making no efforts to change, what’s to stop you working for a new management team?! Explore the latest local openings today.


The creative & innovative employee

How creative or innovative do you get to be on a daily basis? It’s important to remember that these words should apply to all industries and jobs, not just the artistic!

Creativity and innovation allow us all to work in new ways, formulate new ideas, and progress. However, employers and managers are overestimating just how much room they give their teams to use these skills.

Employees don’t feel able to be innovative at work…

  • 76% of business leaders believe they ’empower their employees to be innovative.’
  • However, only 34% of professionals feel encouraged in this way.
  • Yet 95% of businesses see innovation as imperative to their business growth and 91% of employees want the opportunity to be more innovative in their roles.
  • Employers are also misreading those tools that inspire creativity. They over-prioritise financial incentives and under-prioritise the role that ‘purpose’ plays in our work.
  • These findings (from Accenture, reported by HR Magazine) also reveal that staff specifically want appropriate skills development, flexible working opportunities, and a healthier work-life balance. Each aspect is believed to nurture greater innovation.

Tips for employers: each aspect features in our ‘7 Days of Employee Attraction Tips.’ See Days 3-5 for more advice. Make sure you’re also gathering genuine feedback from your employees. You don’t want to be among the managers who think they’re creating a culture that they’re not!

Good managers can spark creativity

It’s interesting to hear that managers can also increase creativity by using one essential skill – attentive listening.

  • In a separate international study, also shared by HR Magazine, employees expressed greater creativity when they felt listened to. Their workload was also of increased quality.
  • Conversely, distracted managers failed to promote such a response.
  • The article additionally highlights several flaws surrounding common brainstorming activities. Many people fear ridicule in response to sharing their ideas. Employees also worry about being the person that constantly offers up ideas in fear of annoying others.

There’s some sage advice for all managers; much of the focus needs to be paid to creating a more relaxed and informal culture that allows for ideas to be developed over time.

A brief note for stifled employees…

Where possible, share your ideas with your manager or a trusted colleague. You may be letting your fears get the better of you. Hopefully, your confidence will soon increase alongside your enjoyment of your role.

However, in instances where you’ve repeatedly tried and still feel stifled, or you simply fancy a change of scene, your skills may be better used elsewhere. You can read and apply for the latest jobs here.