Job Search September! Is everyone looking for a new job?

Will this new season also spell the start of a new job frenzy throughout the nation? Some of the latest findings suggest so…

Wix (the web development platform) has conducted its own research among professionals. They’ve found that:

  • 49% of British professionals intend to leave their job on return from their summer holiday.
  • September is one of the most popular times to change jobs, next to January.
  • A number of workers are deliberately missing return flights and hiding their holiday social media updates so their employers won’t see!
  • There is also data regarding the desire to set up new businesses, the industries people want to specialise in and the type of breaks that inspire a new job search!

Why are professionals feeling so fed up?

  • 69% of respondents experience a sense of ‘dread’ about returning to the office.
  • 42% of people crave more flexibility in their working lives.
  • 39% state that they feel ‘undervalued’.
  • In addition, 37% believe they’re underpaid for their role.
  • 34% say they either don’t like their boss or colleagues.
  • And 31% cite poor management at work.

Will we really experience a Job Search September?

It’s unlikely that the whole study pool will hand in their notice this month! While holidays often spark a period of reflection, many people won’t follow through on their ideas on return from their break.

That said, some of the group will, and the fact remains that this is a popular time to make a change. Other findings reflect some of the above sentiment, yet less dramatically(/imminently)!

For instance, a separate study suggests that just under 1/3 of office employees are ‘considering’ finding a new job within the next year.

Many of the triggers are the same…

  • 39% hope to achieve a better work-life balance, with 32% specifically wanting flexible working options.
  • 38% are looking for a pay rise.
  • This group also believe that their skills will be ‘more desirable in the coming months’ (32%) – and that they’ll still receive ‘multiple job offers with competitive salaries’ (33%).
  • The youngest age group (comprising 16 to 24-year-olds) appears most likely to search for a new role, with career progression and work-life balance the greatest incentives for this demographic. They also prioritise corporate culture over pay rates.
  • Employees aged 35 and over are 10% less likely to job search, yet place an increased value on salaries (42% versus 17% for 16 to 24-year-olds). This is unsurprising if you consider career stage and life factors, including average household and/or caring responsibilities.

Both articles mention the need for employers to prepare themselves for a period of change. Alongside exploring staff retention strategies, this may naturally include an increased recruitment focus.

Please call the office on 01225 313130 to discuss your recruitment requirements or email the team directly. Job-seekers can apply for the latest openings via the jobs page, CV upload, or by email. Here’s what to include in your cover email if you’re looking for a new job!



Interview thank you letters – should you send them?

Should you send interview thank you letters when working with a recruitment agency?

It’s always great to see careers and recruitment topics featured in the mainstream media. One of the latest examples is Cosmopolitan’s focus on whether it’s appropriate to send job interview thank you notes.

There’s some really helpful advice within the piece. However, this particular article only applies to those interviewing directly with employers.

What about when your interview has been arranged via a recruitment agency?

In this case, it’s not appropriate to communicate directly with the interviewer/s, unless your consultant has specifically asked you to do so.

The client (your prospective employer) has chosen to work with a recruitment agency for a number of reasons. This is often partially due to time restrictions and wanting to ensure that there’s a dedicated person who’s committed to you throughout the selection process.

They will have arranged specific check-in points with your consultant, who remains your primary point of contact for interview feedback and similar.

So when will you receive your interview feedback…and when can you provide yours?

The specific timings will vary by business and agency. Most reputable agencies will take a proactive approach and want to hear from you soon after your client interview.

They’ll be interested to hear your perspective; this may include aspects such as…

  • How you felt the interview went
  • Your perceived connection with your interviewer/s
  • Any concerns you had regarding challenging questions or items that arose
  • Your interest in accepting the role if offered

Your consultant will also be in touch with the client at the soonest opportunity; as dictated by the employer’s availability.

Alongside relaying your feedback and interest in the role (where applicable), they’ll also gather the employer’s feedback. At this stage, it may be a case of awaiting further updates regarding second interviews or other selection processes.

Your consultant should advise you of the above. In certain circumstances (for instance, client holidays/travel or the need to await in-house meetings) it may be the case that there’s a bit of a wait before the client will enter their decision-making process. Your consultant should also keep you updated on this.

But what if you’d still really like to send interview thank you letters?

Even though it’s not appropriate to contact the client directly, there is another option! Why not email a thank you note via your recruitment consultant, detailing those aspects you would like to send on to the client? Revisit the Cosmopolitan piece for advice regarding the contents of this.

That way, your agency can relay your feedback via their email or phone conversations with the client.

This will still enable you to highlight your interest in the role and could help you stand out from your competitors.

Ideally, this should be sent to your consultant soon after your interview so that the experience is fresh in mind…and your feedback reaches the client before their decision is made.

Of course, before you get to the interview stage you need to apply for suitable vacancies! Here are the latest local opportunities.



How secure are today’s jobs?

How secure are today’s jobs compared to those of twenty years ago? Plus to what extent do these findings even affect employees and job-seekers?

Before we delve into the latest stats, there’s one important question we should be asking…

What does job security really mean?

There was a time when job security was closely correlated with a ‘job for life’. Something now considered to be a feature of the distant past – and not expected to return, either!

In more recent decades (and as per the Oxford Dictionary), job security has become “the state of having a job…from which one is unlikely to be dismissed”.

How secure are jobs in 2019 versus 1998?

Due to the discussions surrounding the gig economy, you won’t be surprised to hear that most people think national job security is diminishing.

However, CIPD research suggests this is untrue:

  • The total share of non-permanent jobs has ‘not increased since 1998’.
  • Nor has the ‘under-employment rate’ of people requiring additional work.
  • The vast majority of national employees are in fact in ‘regular’ 9-5 jobs.
  • Any fluctuations that have occurred throughout this twenty-year period are additionally temporary in nature and relate to specific events, such as recessions.
  • While largely positive, the CIPD has called on the government to do more to tackle poor pay and discrimination issues.

Does it matter how secure your job is in 2019?

You’d be forgiven for thinking that the growing gig economy and increase in ‘side jobs’ are signs that professionals are less concerned about job security…

Advice for those worried about job insecurity:

MindTools has issued advice to help people cope with the uncertainty of their work.

Two of the best tips from this piece also apply to your job-seeking process…

  • ‘Show your value’: not only does this approach help you stand out as an employee, yet it also helps set you apart from your job-seeking competitors.
  • ‘Stay current’: upskilling is sure to be a continued theme in recruitment news, as technology advances alter the jobs landscape. The way you market your skills should also be current…including regularly refreshing your CV!

Looking for a new job? You’ll find the latest temporary, permanent and contract openings listed here



Improving your workplace wellness

Wish you felt happier at work but have no idea what contributes to your workplace wellness? New findings from The Myers-Briggs Company could help.

We recently discussed the fact workplace wellbeing appears to increase with age. The article cited a Myers-Briggs study that we’ll be returning to today. According to their findings…

Your workplace wellness is most affected by:

  1. Your relationships with colleagues (7.85/10)
  2. A sense of ‘meaning’ (7.69/10)
  3. Your workplace accomplishments (7.66/10)
  4. A feeling of engagement (7.43/10)
  5. Experiencing positive emotions (7.19/10)

There is also a strong relationship between high wellbeing and reporting the following:

  • High job satisfaction
  • A strong interest in your day-to-day job activities
  • Greater commitment to the company
  • ‘Citizenship behaviours’, including a willingness to assist your colleagues and/or reach business objectives
  • A lower likelihood to look for an alternative job.

You’ll find more information regarding the correlations with gender, occupation, and location here.

How to use these findings to your benefit:

If you’ve already been looking for alternative jobs for the past few weeks (or months!), you’ll know that there is something that’s encouraging you to look elsewhere.

Yet have you had the chance to identify what this is? It could simply be the case that you’re ready for a new challenge. Or it could be that one or more of the above factors are missing.

  • Take a look at both of the above lists. Which elements ring true to you? Then, taking a closer look at the first list, which elements matter most to you?
  • Perhaps it’s more important that you enjoy working with your colleagues and you’re interested in your work than to feel as if you’re achieving certain accomplishments. There are no wrong answers!

How to use your findings to support your job search:

  1. Watch out for key words on job advertisements and company websites. For example, if you’re looking for a sense of meaning, you could research your prospective responsibilities, company mission statements, and how the industry benefits communities or society as a whole.
  2. Share your priorities with your Recruitment Consultant and ask more about these elements in your interviews. For instance, if you’re guided by a sense of accomplishment, you could enquire about the sorts of projects you would work on, whether there is the chance to work to targets, etc.
  3. Add more depth to your applications and interviews. Use your personal motivations to engage prospective employers and stand out. For example, when asked why you applied for an opening, you could discuss your core motivations (e.g. being a part of a community-driven organisation) and what it was about the job spec and website that attracted you to the role (e.g. the fact you’d be supporting others, the community projects discussed, and/or a specific shared mission).

Why not get started on that research now by taking a look at the latest jobs!



Job hunting this lunch break?

Are you using your lunch break to job search? Why so many professionals are, plus some considerations to be aware of…

The lunch break job hunters:

  • It turns out that 1/4 of UK professionals are now job searching at lunchtime.
  • 1/3 of people aged 22-35 even apply for job vacancies during working hours.
  • In comparison, the over-55s are more likely to conduct their job search after work (58%).

What’s behind these figures?

  • The majority of respondents hope to increase their salaries (41%). This actually contradicts other recent research findings.
  • There’s also the aim of making a ‘fresh start’ (31%);
  • Plus simply wanting to know what else is out there (over 25%)
  • Alongside an eagerness to work for a different company (23%).

Some hints and tips…

  1. It’s definitely wise to save your job hunting for your lunch break rather than during office hours. You’re entitled to a break. For most, this will include an hour-long lunchtime. For others, it’ll simply be the 20 minutes that you earn for working more than a 6 hour day. Either way, this break should ideally be ‘uninterrupted’ and is yours to spend as you wish…within reason, of course (your contract may stipulate certain limitations, such as the amount of alcohol that can be consumed during the day. But that’s a different topic)!
  2. Avoid using any work devices to conduct your job search; even if it is during your lunch break. Your employer may monitor computers, laptops/tablets and phones. This is a private endeavour that should be limited to your own technology.
  3. On a similar note, always use your own email address, rather than your company’s. Again, company emails may be monitored.
  4. Private devices operated on company Wi-Fi might not be so private after all. Where possible, take yourself out of the office where you can conduct your search in peace.
  5. Don’t rush your applications. You want to make sure you can give your CV and any cover letters proper attention. Use this time to research and bookmark openings and make any initial enquiries. Only send your CV if you’re sure it’s ready to be sent (keep a copy in your email drafts for this purpose). Also be sure to proofread your cover note and check that you’re not emailing it to your boss/colleague by mistake!
  6. Lunch breaks are fantastic for contacting and/or meeting with recruitment agencies. Let them know if you’re only available for a certain period of time so you feel more relaxed. For further advice about your search, please call an Appoint consultant on 01225 313130. Here’s what to include if you’re emailing your CV to a recruitment agency. And, finally, here’s where you can upload your CV via our website.

Best of luck with your job search – we look forward to hearing from you regarding jobs in Bath and the surrounding area. 



Is voicemail dying in recruitment? Advice included!

Why you might want to rethink your attitude towards voicemail when it comes to your job search…

It’s great that there are so many ways to get in touch with recruitment agencies and prospective employers these days. This may be via social media, email, a text, or call. However, research suggests that one method of contact might be dying out. Yes, the title gives this one away, it’s the voicemail!

According to the research (published by HR News):

  • Only 20% of respondents choose to leave a voicemail if they can’t reach their contact by phone.
  • There’s a distinct age divide: middle-aged and older people are far more likely to both listen to and leave voicemails promptly versus their younger counterparts.

What stops people from leaving a voicemail?

  • The primary reason (22%) for not leaving voicemails is that people don’t like to receive them themselves! In other words, they’re trying to do the prospective recipient a favour of sorts. This was closely followed by:
  • The fear of making a mistake that they can’t delete (21%),
  • A belief that it won’t even be listened to (17%),
  • Disliking their own voice (17%),
  • And embarrassment that they’re not speaking directly to someone (15%).

The article also cites a number of reasons that people dislike receiving voicemails.

Advice for job-seekers…

Perhaps it is the case that voicemails are a dying breed of communication. However, whatever your viewpoint, you’d still be wise to brave them for the good of your job search for now!

You never know which HR manager, employer or recruitment consultant might be calling you – nor for that matter their preferred method of contact.

It’s savvy to make sure you’re as accessible as possible and you’re actively listening to and responding to any form of communication regarding your job applications. After all, you don’t want to miss an urgent interview invite or temp assignment. You certainly don’t want to be that one candidate who is always super tricky to get hold of.

Alongside this, leaving voicemails yourself where appropriate allows you the opportunity to impress an employer with your professionalism. Our advice?

  1. If you’re nervous about leaving a message, be proactive. Before you even pick up the phone, jot down a few points that you’d say. Say them aloud to yourself if needed.
  2. Always state your name and number clearly and slowly, repeating any details as appropriate.
  3. If you make a mistake, most voicemails offer the facility to re-record the message. If not, apologise for the confusion and move on…just as you would in regular conversation. Remember, the recipient is also human!

What to do if your voicemails don’t work:

Don’t leave this to guesswork! Make sure that your contact knows in advance that this is the case and ensure you provide alternative routes to reach you.

Additionally, always respond in as timely a fashion as you can. If you’ve asked for emails or texts, be sure to monitor them.

The more proactive you are, and the more you use your initiative, the more points you stack up against your job-seeking competitors!

Looking to contact a recruitment agency for the first time by email? Here’s what to include in your cover message



What employees want & need in 2019

Do you know what most employees want from their employers?

It’s always interesting to see how your daily hopes differ from those of your colleagues. Of course, if you’re the employer it also becomes rather beneficial to know those factors that could be getting your team down.

Sometimes, the least expected concerns may be those that top the list. This could be said for the leading ‘want’ in Viking’s data, compiled from nearly 14,000 respondents…

What most employees want:

  1. Greater information regarding the possible health implications of their daily ‘display screen equipment’ use and sedentary working ways.
  2. Increased mental health and work stress support.
  3. Mental health training for all managers.
  4. Remote working opportunities.
  5. Protected lunch breaks…so employees actually get to take them.
  6. A four-day working week; working longer days Monday to Thursday to accommodate this.
  7. More artwork throughout the office space – to lift moods and reduce stress.
  8. Guidance on social media policies.
  9. Efforts to reduce ‘annoying office habits’.
  10. And for employers not to ban social media use (believing that this would actually hinder productivity).

It’s well worth reading the full piece on the Viking Blog to see all the supporting stats. Alongside those irritating office habits that make 41% of people want to leave their jobs!

Elsewhere, employers are reminded of another specific need…

HR Magazine has a thought-provoking post regarding the impact of fertility issues on employees. A conversation that is rarely discussed in HR and recruitment media.

The feature highlights the emotional challenges experienced, as well as the logistical problems posed by treatment appointments and medication needs.

It also provides some well-informed suggestions for employers and HR professionals.

Now, what do you really want or need from your job?

This is a fantastic question to ask yourself at the start of a New Year. What would make your Monday mornings brighter in 2019? Do you look forward to a new challenge or setting? Have you outgrown your existing role and/or do your skills exceed your salary?

If the answer is ‘yes’, you’ll want to keep a close eye on our news and jobs!



Using the 80-20 principle in your job search!

How to apply the 80-20 principle to your job search…

Happy New Year to you all! Perhaps you’re simply catching up on some careers and recruitment news after the festive break, or maybe January has inspired you to launch a fresh new job search. Whatever brings you here today, this post endeavours to save you some time…

We’ll explore a rule of thumb that you can apply to all aspects of your work. Including your efforts to secure that new role.

Introducing the 80-20 principle…

This popular business concept is more formally known as the ‘Pareto Principle’. Which just so happens to be named after its founder, Vilfredo Pareto – a notable economist and philosopher.

Forbes provides an excellent explanation of the 80-20 principle. However, let’s get straight to the core finding: 80% of the results you generate at work (and in your job search) will come from just 20% of your total efforts.

Let’s imagine you spend 100 hours (just over 4 days) searching, applying and interviewing for new roles. The average person would undertake 80 hours (3.33 full days) of action without achieving many results. It would be the 20 hours of work (less than one full day’s efforts) that would provide 80% of the pay-off.

How accurate is this?

This is a rule of thumb. So, it may be that just 15% of your hard work gleans the most results or it may be that it takes a spot more effort on some occasions. However, it does appear to broadly apply across life and business.

As for the 100 hours to find a job part, this is just an example. It’s incredibly challenging to predict how long it takes to find a job due to the number of variables – for some people it takes only a matter of hours or days, for others it’s a far longer process.

The Pareto Principle also appears to apply to the choices we regularly make. We tend to pick the same 20% of options 80% of the time. So that’s the same few lunch options on regular rotation, the same tasks we’ll select from our daily/weekly lists, and the few outfits we’ll most often pick from our wardrobes.

So how does this knowledge benefit your job search?

The trick is in the application of the 80-20 principle. Rather than throwing all of your waking hours at your job search, invest your time where it will truly count. For instance…

  • Identifying your core search requirements before you get started vs. applying for every interesting vacancy you spot and then later realising they’re not right for you anyway.
  • Ensuring you’re contacting recruitment agencies who definitely recruit for your target roles/industry.
  • Generally doing your research at every stage – from thoroughly reading job specs (vital for CV writing) to interview preps.
  • Making sure your CV clearly demonstrates your suitability for each job; even when skimming.

You won’t always know which job vacancies will generate interview offers. After all, you’ll rarely know who you’re up against or exactly what the employer is searching for. But you can still save yourself a lot of wasted time.

Eager to get started? You’ll find our jobs vacancies listed here.



The job skills special

As ever, we’re keeping a close eye on the job skills news. It’s vital that everyone involved in the recruitment process (candidates, clients and consultants included!) remains aware of the nation’s changing skills needs. Information that becomes all the more vital as the UK skills shortage becomes all the more prolonged…

What exactly is the skills shortage?

Quite simply, it’s the shortfall of suitable applicants for the number of job vacancies that the nation has to fill. It’s an issue that we’ve been discussing for more than 18 months.

The latest job skills news reveals that…

  1. Most businesses (79%) plan to increase their higher-skilled roles within the coming years. However, the majority of employers (66%) worry that they will struggle to find suitably matched employees.
  2. A Barclays LifeSkills survey shows that almost 60% of UK adults ‘lack core transferable’ job skills, including leadership and creativity. Differences are reported among demographic groups.
  3. 2/5 of people are being recruited for roles before discovering they do not have the right ‘soft skills’ required. More than 1/2 of workers have left a role on realising their personality or work style does not suit the position.
  4. SMEs face the worst of the skills shortage, with underperforming recruits costing an annual average of £39,500.

What are the solutions?

According to the reports, changes must be made at a formal education level. All future workers should be equipped with adequate skills for the modern workplace.

Alongside this, employers need to provide continued training opportunities. Therefore enabling existing workers to upskill on the job; aiding staff retention and business growth.

Businesses must also review their recruitment approach to ensure…

  • They are managing to attract enough applicants.
  • Employers also know how to best identify suitable skill-sets.
  • The job offering is additionally appealing enough to compete with those of other (perhaps better known) organisations.
  • Decision-making processes are swift enough to retain interested applicants.
  • While ample onboarding is provided to welcome new staff members.
  • Plus the list really does go on..!

What should you do now?

  • Employers & employees: keep reading articles such as these! We regularly share posts discussing the most sought-after job skills – useful insights whether you’re the one looking to fill these or the businesses competing to attract them!
  • Especially for job-seekers: do all that you can to ensure that you’re searching for the right jobs for you and you’re doing everything possible to highlight your skills. Stop the scattergun approach (i.e. applying for anything and everything regardless of whether it suits your skills and experience!) and make sure your CV clearly matches each job specification you put yourself forward for. Read job adverts as closely as you can – they highlight the most essential skills for each individual role.
  • Especially for businesses: start working through that bulleted list above! Your Recruitment Consultant is the perfect person to call on to support you with this. For tailored recruitment advice, please call the office on 01225 313130.