The most common career regrets

Sharing the most common career regrets…to help you avoid them!

Onrec has conducted its own research on this topic – and has a full report on its website. As this houses all their exclusive stats, you’ll really want to head there for a full and insightful read.

They explore:

  • How many people experience such regrets (this may surprise!)
  • The top 10 career regrets
  • Gender disparities
  • The actual risks that people wish they’d taken
  • Job satisfaction levels
  • The percentage of people whose jobs incorporate their ‘passions’
  • Alongside whether or not respondents feel they’ve left it too late to make a career change, among other topics.

Let’s take a look at those most common career regrets:

Out of respect for the exclusivity of this survey, we’ll only share five of the ten 10 regrets today. These include:

  1. Not ‘taking more initiative’
  2. A lack of mentorship or guidance
  3. Being too safe and ‘not taking more chances’
  4. Not keeping up a personal network
  5. Failing to leave a job you dislike sooner

What makes the findings so interesting:

Understanding others’ regrets can help you explore your own concerns and, potentially, avoid making the same mistakes in future. It can also help you to think more deeply about your career priorities. This is incredibly useful when deciding which industries you want to pursue, the jobs you should apply for and even the employers and teams you want to work with.

The above items aren’t necessarily those regrets you’d most expect to see and they may not have been topics you’ve ever considered. When did you last analyse how much initiative you take in your work? Or how much guidance you’ve had to get you to where you are today?

How to use these insights to your advantage…

  • Read the full list and see which items you identify with – both from past experience and what you most want to avoid.
  • For each item that concerns you, ask yourself what can you do to take control of this risk right now.
  • Make sure you stay smart. For example, leaving a job you dislike without having a better alternative lined up can leave you with yet another form of regret! Getting started with your job search while you’re still employed is usually a smarter option.
  • Tap into those you trust. By their nature, career regrets are personal and you’ll have to make your own decisions about what’s right for you. However, consider item 2 above. Where possible, seek out the advice and insights of trusted and experienced people. This may also include your family, friends and peers as well as industry professionals, including recruitment consultants who specialise in your target field. The REC will help you to identify professionally accredited Recruitment Agencies local to you.


Job acceptance regret

Have you ever experienced job acceptance regret? This sentiment is growing among professionals…

Our first news finding relates to Gen Z job-seekers (those with birth dates ranging ‘from the mid-1990s to the early 2000s’). However, you’ll see that the problem is far from exclusive to this age group.

New findings reveal that…

  • 40% of Gen Z candidates have experienced job acceptance regret – and would not ‘repeat their decision’ if offered another opportunity.
  • Alongside this, 51% cannot foresee an extensive career with their employer.
  • 1/3 of candidates actually plan to resign from their role within a year.

So what’s causing this regret?

The article doesn’t cite why the respondents have experienced regret. Yet it does call on employers to improve their understanding of this age group. Within this, a number of core employee priorities are discussed:

  • Development opportunities: allowing employees to continually update their skills and feel ‘relevant’ to the changing business landscape.
  • Flexible working opportunities and a healthy work-life balance.
  • Meaningful connections with their managers and teams.

What about other groups & your expectations?

As mentioned, it’s not only Gen Z job-seekers that have felt some level of job acceptance regret. Another study suggests that the failure of a job to meet expectations could be contributing to this issue. 48% of employees of all ages have left a position as a result of this. The disparity between expectations and reality was largely attributed to:

  • Differing job responsibilities (59%)
  • The ‘working environment’ (42%)
  • Working hours/shift patterns (35%)
  • And salary or benefits packages (29%)

Advice for candidates & employers:

It’s great that we have access to this sort of data as it helps us make better decisions, whether we’re looking for jobs or to create our teams.

Candidates: 

  • There’s always going to be the chance that a job differs from your expectations. Yet it’s helpful if you identify some of your hopes and priorities early in your job search.
  • Let your Recruitment Consultant know what matters most to you. Not only the jobs you’re looking for, yet the environments you work well, in and the salary package that you hope to achieve. Be honest with yourself. For example, don’t fool yourself into thinking you’d be happy to work alone in an office if you truly thrive off of a team setting.
  • Use your interviews as the opportunity to find out more about a typical day in the role and to get a sense of the business culture.
  • Try not to feel pressured into accepting a position if it’s ringing alarm bells. Consider all options: remaining in your existing role until something more suitable arises (if applicable/possible), considering temporary or contract work, and continuing your job search.

Employers:

  • There are two primary aspects to consider here: improved staff attraction and employee retention. They happen to be intrinsically linked.
  • You can have the ‘best’ staff attraction approach yet if the reality doesn’t meet expectation, you’ll experience high turnover rates. It’s about tapping into more of what employees value to both attract and keep your team.
  • Furthermore, the more honestly you can depict the role, the more likely you are to attract the right person to fill it. It’s better to have fewer highly suitable applicants than to feel forced into extending a job offer to someone who won’t be the best fit.
  • You can also use interviews to go beyond a candidate’s skills and into their values and attributes.
  • Work closely with your Recruitment Consultant to attract the right people for your roles. Call the office for further support on 01225 313130.