How to calm nerves before an interview

Due to recent events, many people across the UK are facing the prospect of looking for work. So, we thought we’d gather our thoughts on how to calm nerves before interview.

Perhaps you’re well used to the interviewing process. Or maybe it’s been years since you’ve had to think about it. Either way, it’s natural to feel a little nervous. Remember, if you stumble on a few words or speak a tad too quickly at times, it’s entirely normal. But the calmer you are, the easier it will be to process questions and formulate the clear responses that show you’re a top candidate for the job.

With redundancy levels increasing, be aware that there may well be heightened competition for the roles you apply for. All the more reason to learn how to calm interview nerves and present the best version of yourself to potential employers.

Want to find out how to relax before interview time? Here’s what we know about managing nerves and supercharging your confidence.

10 top tips for calm and confident interviews

Thanks to Covid-19, your job interview might occur in person and at a distance, over video conference or on the phone. Here are our recommendations, whatever form it takes.

  • Keep a copy of your CV, the job description and any interview notes to hand in case you draw a blank.
  • If you’ve been asked to deliver a presentation, practice it on your own or with a friend before the real thing.
  • If you’re interviewing by video call, make sure your internet connection is sound and that you know how to work your microphone and camera. Shut out background noise and distractions where possible.
  • Limit your caffeine! It might usually be your best friend of a morning, but nerves plus too much coffee isn’t a good combination. Try swapping in a herbal tea or cold glass of water.
  • Suck on a mint beforehand – some folk swear by it for calming nerves and nausea.
  • Arrive – whether that’s at the workplace, in front of your Skype window or by your phone – in plenty of time. ‘Late’ is never a good first impression to make.
  • Do a quick final check of your appearance before the interviewer sees you. You don’t want that last-minute tea spill or rainstorm to affect your chances.
  • Breathe! It sounds obvious, but shallow breathing does nothing to relieve tension. Try a few rounds of breathing in for five seconds, holding for five, then breathing out for five or more.
  • Listen to some relaxing sounds before starting. There are plenty of clips to choose from on meditation apps like Insight Timer or sites like YouTube.
  • When it’s time to begin, focus on speaking at a measured pace. It’ll give you more time to think and make your answers easier to understand.

Don’t forget – you’re an interviewer too. Use your time at the end of the conversation to ask the questions that matter to you.

Face-to-face interviews might feel strange due to current restrictions, especially if you’ve been working from home since lockdown. Take all the usual precautions, follow the safety rules at the interviewing location and don’t be afraid to remind your interviewer about distancing if they appear to have forgotten.

Lastly, note that nearly everyone has had an interview that didn’t go to plan. If that happens, don’t be disheartened. Learn from it and move on, knowing that the next one is bound to be better!

Start your search right

Now you’ve got the tools to calm interview nerves, you’re ready to talk jobs. Call us to chat on 01225 313130 or browse our current listings.



How will the coronavirus affect your job search?

How will the coronavirus affect your job search?

We all know that this is an anxious and unsettling time. The UK is still in the early stages of the coronavirus and there’s a lot of uncertainty surrounding its impact on the nation. This includes uncertainty regarding how businesses will operate over the coming months.

Of course, any business disruption may naturally have an impact on recruitment plans – which may also directly affect your job search. So what should you be doing and considering at this time?

First things first…

We hope this would go without saying, yet your health should remain of the utmost priority. As should the health of your wider community!

If you are exhibiting any symptoms of respiratory illness (even if you think it’s just a cold), you should avoid attending in-person meetings and interviews. It’s wise to contact your recruitment consultant (or the employer if you’re not working with a recruitment agency) at the earliest possible time. Even if this is on the day of the scheduled interview!

Please note: you must call 111 if you believe you have any symptoms of coronavirus.

Always politely apologise for the inconvenience caused by your rescheduling and enquire about the possibility of other interview arrangements.

Alternative interview arrangements:

Depending on the employer’s availability and resources, don’t be surprised if you’re offered a telephone or Skype-based interview.

You should treat such interviews just as you would an in-person meeting. In other words, you should be researching and preparing for your interview!

If you’ll be conducting the interview by Skype or another video resource, you still want to dress as if you’re attending an in-person interview. You’ll also want to consider your body language throughout.

When speaking by phone, ensure to make an effort to communicate in a positive tone. Smiling can help to convey a more friendly tone, even though this may feel odd!

When meeting in person…

Be prepared for certain customs to be a little different. For instance, many health experts say handshakes aren’t recommended at this time; however much this goes against our cultural instincts and traditional interview etiquette! A smile with a polite nod and/or wave has become an appropriate alternative.

Many offices will also have hand sanitisers in their reception areas. Politely ask to use these when entering and exiting the building (or use your own) to demonstrate your awareness and initiative at this time.

Respect any efforts your interviewer makes towards social distancing…without trailing miles behind them!

Keep applying:

Please never assume that all new recruitment plans are on hold! Many businesses are operating as normal through these times. Furthermore, some employers will actually have more time to review their recruitment needs as they adopt different working arrangements.

It’s still a great time for you to make job applications, conduct job market research, carry out interview prep, and contact recruitment agencies.

Prepare for the unexpected:

We’ve said it before, job searches can feature a number of setbacks. During such times of change, there’s an increased likelihood of employers altering their recruitment plans at short notice.

This also increases the likelihood of recruitment delays and/or rejections. We recommend taking some time to mentally prepare for such setbacks – discussing any concerns with your recruitment consultant.

And keep in touch!

Don’t forget to keep in touch with your consultant, whether that’s to let them know about your changing plans, advise them of self-isolation, rearrange interviews, or seek some advice about your job search. You can reach your Appoint consultant via 01225 313130.

* Important Reminder * – the government is updating its coronavirus advice on a daily basis. Please stay abreast of the latest recommendations regarding your health and social interactions. 



Coping with job search setbacks

What to do when you encounter job search setbacks…

While it would be wonderful if everyone had a smooth job search experience, some disappointments are likely. It could be anything from finding out that a position has already closed to not being selected for an interview.

However, if you’re mentally prepared for such happenings, it’s easier to stay on track and maintain some motivation. If this talk of mental prep sounds familiar, it’s something we discussed in this feature on the four job search phases last month. The four phases were identified by Kourtney Whitehead, whose advice we’ll be discussing again today – this time regarding the three ‘unavoidable job search setbacks’.

The three job search setbacks include:

1. Being rejected for a ‘position you’re clearly qualified for’ 

There are some great insights here, including three core messages that particularly ring true:

  1. Many applicants encounter this
  2. It doesn’t reflect your individual ‘market value’
  3. You won’t necessarily “experience predictable outcomes throughout your search”

Interviews can be like exams; sometimes the ones you think you’ve failed are actually the ones you’ve passed with flying colours! Of course, this can apply in reverse and sometimes it’s the jobs you think that you’re a shoo-in for that you don’t get.

This is a topic we’ve covered in more depth on our post about handling interview rejection; even if it happens multiple times.

2. Finding a great opening that doesn’t meet your salary expectations

Whitehead’s advice stands out here because it’s so realistic to everyday job market happenings. Whereas many articles will tell you to ask for more than an advertised salary, Whitehead points out that if you’re not willing to work for the advertised salary range you should be upfront from the start.

She’s not saying that companies won’t ever pay more for the right person. However, some budgets are fixed for a reason and you don’t want to waste anyone’s time, including your own.

This issue can be easier to raise when working via a Recruitment Consultant – allowing you to have a frank conversation outside of the pressures of an interview setting. Your Consultant can help manage your expectations and let you know whether there’s the possibility of flexibility or not.

3. Not getting a job you feel ’emotionally attached’ to

Not many people discuss this common issue. Perhaps before you’ve so much as attended an interview (or even submitted a CV!) you’re envisaging life in your new role…and you really like your visions of the future.

But then you get the rejection and it’s far worse than usual because you feel as if something has actually been taken away from you.

In this case, Whitehead recommends making some rejection plans. She suggests speaking to your closest friends and family and letting them know what you need from them during these trickier times – whether that’s time alone or some extra company and conversation.

Even if you don’t feel you have a support network around you, you can plan some activities to help pick yourself up in the case of bad news. Again, you should hopefully feel able to confide in your Recruitment Consultant during these times!

You can read the rest of Kourtney Whitehead’s advice via Forbes.

Get your local job search started via our jobs page and/or submit your CV via the website.



How to prep for each job search phase

How to mentally prepare for each job search phase…

As we enter the last week of the month (which also brings the final posts in our special January series), it’s time to prepare for each phase of your job search. Today’s advice comes from Kourtney Whitehead, via Forbes.

Most career advice articles largely focus on the practical side of job hunting, from CV writing to interviews. All very necessary! However, it’s rare to find articles that explore the emotional and mental aspects of your search.

After all, as Whitehead suggests, job searches can be long and stressful at times. Particularly if you’re searching for roles in a new field or you work within a particularly competitive industry. Yet a little bit of mental prep can help you feel far more in control and may minimise some of the stress along the way.

Prepping for each job search phase…

1. Getting started

This is described as the easiest phase, due to your increased levels of energy and optimism. As Whitehead says, “few things in life will transform your daily experience faster than finding a new job.”

The first phase starts as soon as you’re actively working on your job search, for instance updating your CV and LinkedIn profile.

Your first mental challenge: fighting the urge to procrastinate. Fear of rejection may stop you from getting going as quickly as you could. The advice is to get started ASAP so as not to extend your search. Don’t let your CV efforts delay you either – focus your attention on tailoring your CV to the most appealing roles, as well as checking for errors.

Tip: don’t get too bogged down in how your CV looks either. A clean and classic layout is often far more reader-friendly than a heavily designed format. Visit our downloads page for more straight-forward CV Advice.

2. Finding leads

This is the most time and energy-intensive aspect phase of your job search. It’s now that you’ll be making contact with prospective employers via jobs boards, recruitment agencies, and similar. You may also soon be fielding calls and juggling interview requests.

Your second mental challenge: reaching out to others for help and being prepared for applications and conversations that don’t lead to results. This phase can leave job-seekers feeling ‘vulnerable’, yet it’s also the stage that Whitehead describes as “the bridge between dreaming for a new job and having your chance to sell yourself during an interview.”

She reminds that this is also the longest stage for most job-seekers. Again, the advice here is to prepare for these feelings and press on.

Tip: finding an expert recruitment consultant that you can really trust and open up to may help reduce some of that vulnerability (as well as giving you access to industry insights and some of the best local employers in your field!). The REC member directory is a great place to start, alongside checking Testimonials and Google Reviews.  

3. Converting opportunities

It’s now that you’re attending interviews, which can prove stressful for many candidates.

Your third mental challenge: second-guessing every aspect of your interview performance. This may include replaying your interview questions and answers on repeat in your mind and picking yourself apart for every perceived wrong.

Whitehead suggests that before each of your interviews you “promise yourself that you will do your best and then choose to be satisfied with wherever that leads you.”

Tip: remember, even if you’ve just been rejected from a role, it doesn’t mean you’ve done anything wrong. Seek feedback where you can (your Recruitment Consultant should assist with this) and move on to the next opportunity.

4.  The negotiations

This is the stage where you’ve received a job offer yet may be faced with a negotiation. You’ll see that many job vacancies indicate a salary range as opposed to a single salary figure. The end offer tends to depend on your experience level.

Your fourth mental challenge: facing negotiations when your salary worth perceptions differ from your prospective employer’s. You may feel pressure and anxiety around your abilities to negotiate and/or the fear of losing the opportunity.

Whitehead advises against undervaluing yourself and failing to negotiate at this stage.

Tip: before applying for roles, it’s worth having a really honest discussion with your Recruitment Consultant about your salary expectations. They can advise what’s realistic for your skills and experience to date and will, in many cases, do much of the salary discussion on your behalf, dependent on individual client arrangements.

We hope you already feel better prepared to start your job search. For further advice, catch up with the rest of our January series so far…

Don’t forget to keep popping back to our News page for more tips. You can also connect with us via Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn and/or register your CV for opportunities



Do you need a career plan?

What would you say if someone asked you to outline your career plan? Are you the sort of person who can give a step by step account of the coming five years? Perhaps you’d struggle to outline the next five months! The question is, does it even matter either way?

If you’ve attended any interviews recently, you’re highly likely to have been asked some form of the career plan question.

For instance:

  • Where do you see yourself in the next year/five years/ten years?
  • What are your goals for the next year/five years/ten years?
  • What are your longer-term career goals?
  • What’s your dream job?
  • Tell me more about your career hopes or aspirations?
  • What are your future goals?
  • Where do you see yourself in your career and what’s next for you?

The wording is different yet the core meaning is the same. The interviewer is trying to establish your intentions, including how likely you are to commit to the opening they’re recruiting for.

They’re also attempting to gauge your level of ambition. Depending on the job role and company set up, they may hope to see that you’re open to internal development opportunities. Conversely, they may be trying to make sure you’re not planning to climb the ranks far sooner than they’d be able to accommodate!

How to answer this sort of interview question:

Before we return to the main focus of our post (namely, whether career plans really matter!), we want to share this blog post from The Balance Careers. It contains some fantastic tips on how to answer these interview questions, with example answers to help you hone yours.

Now back to those career plans. Do you really need one?

To quote Melody Wilding, writing for Forbes, “you can move forward confidently in your career without a five-year plan. You can still be successful while doing it from a place of agility and resiliency, not pushing and forcing.”

Yes, this is excellent news for anyone who struggles to map out their future! That said, there are also some useful insights to make any existing career plans more effective.

Summarising some key points from Wilding’s feature:

  • None of us can predict our future – and that includes our future priorities and opportunities.
  • If you’re overly focused on one set plan, you may reject ‘important opportunities.’
  • You may see setbacks as failures and stop trying.
  • All in all, you may end up feeling ‘stuck’ in your career.

How to plan more effectively:

The above isn’t to say you shouldn’t consider your future plans at all. Wilding recommends:

  • Questioning whether the career path you’re on is your own or someone else’s (i.e. are you actually pursuing someone else’s idea of success? That someone else could be a boss, former teacher, partner, friend, family member…)
  • Questioning any ‘shoulds’ that crop up. For instance, saying you should pursue a promotion in your current line of work or you should want to gain managerial experience.
  • Considering the shorter term. What do you see yourself changing or not changing in the coming year?
  • Taking a more experimental approach; allowing yourself to make small changes that you can continually adapt and respond to, rather than pursuing a rigid five-year plan.
  • ‘Reframing failure as feedback’ and looking at what you’ve learned from the situation and what you can do next.
  • Reviewing your plans on a regular basis to make sure they still fit your current intentions.

What to do next:

Why not keep things simple and think about your coming year.

What are your priorities right now? Are there any non-negotiables for your next role? Is there anything that has previously been non-negotiable that you may now be open to?

Work through all of today’s questions in your own time and you’ll be ready for the career plan question…both from yourself and your future interviewers!

A reminder to bookmark, return to and share our News & Advice feed throughout January for more positive new year content. You can also connect with us via Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn



Most-wanted employee traits

Introducing the employee traits that could speed up your job search…

As per yesterday’s post, we’re dedicating all of January to positive news items to support your career goals. Today, we’ll take a look at the six top traits that can enhance job search success.

Each of these attributes has been selected by recruiters, so you know they’re qualities that employers are genuinely looking for.

We’ll also share our own pointers throughout this post to help you get the most out of the information provided.

A reminder before you read on…

You don’t necessarily need to possess each trait to find a new job! When reading articles such as these, look out for those characteristics you already have and consider how you can best highlight them.

As for any remaining qualities, there’s always the chance to build these in future.

Six of the most-wanted employee traits

1. Proactivity

  • This quality earned a unanimous vote from the recruiters. It could also be referred to as ‘initiative’ as the description details the ability to prioritise, alongside working ‘independently and unprompted’.
  • Brainstorm examples of when your employers have benefited from your initiative and/or proactive nature. Weave these into your CV and interview responses.
  • Really want to prove your initiative? Consider the ways you can go beyond your job-seeking competitors. For example, by taking your interview research a step further and suggesting ways you can help achieve company goals or overcome business challenges.

2. Adaptability

  • Again, this attribute could come under another name: ‘flexibility’. Employers are looking to see that you can adapt to any changes that occur – whether these are changes to your everyday working role or larger organisational happenings.
  • As above (and for each of our subsequent tips!) start by brainstorming some of your finest practical examples. What changes have you faced and overcome at work?
  • You can also ensure to remain outwardly calm and positive regarding any surprises or changes that occur throughout your recruitment process. Whether that’s being interviewed by additional team members or being set an unexpected task. Often your attitude to taking on the task is a key part of the decision-making process.

3. Communication

  • Effective communication skills are vital. This isn’t just about your workplace conversations, yet rather each of your verbal, non-verbal and written cues. 
  • Convey positivity and respect towards each point of contact you encounter during your job search. That’s everyone from the receptionist you meet while waiting for your interview to the prospective colleagues you’re introduced to.
  • Don’t think your written communications have to stop at your CV and cover letter. Interview thank you emails offer another opportunity to demonstrate your writing skills. What’s more, there’s nothing to stop you from producing a document that showcases some of your recent projects or other working successes.

4. Commercial sense

  • A strong sense of business savvy or ‘commercial awareness’ can set you apart from your job-seeking competitors. This includes, yet is not limited to, an awareness of relevant industry trends and business opportunities.
  • This takes us back to that need to research beyond the business basics. Investigate industry and economic news reports, watch out for patterns and trends, and consider how your skills could be of benefit.
  • Ask interviewers questions about industry opportunities and challenges. Listen carefully to the responses and, where possible, tell your interviewer why you’re best placed to support them.

5. Empathy

  • Who wants to work with colleagues (or companies) who fail to put themselves in others’ shoes? The ability to be tactful and sensitive is prized and may just become one of the most valuable skills of the future.
  • There are many ways to communicate empathy during your interview. It starts by treating your interviewer like the individual they are. Find out more about what they enjoy about working for the company and the primary challenges they face within their role. Acknowledge their viewpoints.
  • Express empathy when discussing former colleagues or business challenges you’ve faced. Your empathy should also extend to your former employer. What’s more, you should remain mindful of giving away sensitive company information. You also want to convey trust!

6. A positive mindset 

  • The ability to focus on the positives of a situation tells employers you’ll always look for the best in things – something that can really help when faced with future challenges.
  • Let’s return to that old adage about never speaking negatively about colleagues or employers during interviews. It can be tempting to speak too freely about tricky bosses or unpleasant working environments. Instead, spin negatives on their head and discuss the positive outcomes. For example, a brief mention of a challenging role which has helped you foster X and Y skills.
  • Remember those non-verbal communication skills; keep your body language open, smile, and tell your interviewer what would excite or inspire you about working for them.

We hope this post has helped you identify some of your strengths and how to express them. Don’t forget to keep returning to our News & Advice feed throughout January for more support.



How failure can benefit your career

Think your early career failure will ruin your future? Think again, it could be the making of your success!

December can be a trying time of year for anyone who isn’t where they want to be in their career. This could be due to missing out on a promotion, not getting invited for a second interview, or even accepting the wrong opportunity.

It’s one of those months where you’re more likely to be meeting up with people you haven’t seen in a while – and answering all sorts of questions about your life and work!

Don’t let this play on your mind. Instead, think about how your recent failures could benefit your future.

How failure can lead to success:

A University study has found that early-career failure can lead to greater success in the longer term. Providing as the person who’s experienced the setback makes the effort to give things another go!

The research pool consisted of scientists about to embark on their careers. Each participant had previously sought funding and the pool was divided into two groups based on their outcomes. One group had just missed out on funding, while the other group had only just achieved the funding.

Each group was followed for a 10-year period, which greatly enhances the validity of these findings.

The ‘near-miss’ group went on to publish as many research papers as their ‘just-made-it’ counterparts. However, most impressively, the near-miss participants also went on to have more hit papers.

Even though this study focused on early career failures, we hazard a guess (from many years of working with clients and candidates!) that the findings will apply broadly throughout the work context.

What is failing forward?

We learned of this study via Stylist magazine, who also explore the concept of ‘failing forward’. This is when you use your failures as a chance to ‘learn and progress’.

As the article suggests, we’ll all fail at something at some point in our career. We just need to learn how to keep going. Hopefully, you can keep this in mind throughout your Christmas conversations.

Struggling to get over a spell of job rejection? Here’s another must-read post.

Ready to find success in a new role? Visit our jobs page.



Career advice: how to handle job rejection

Have you faced more than your fair share of job rejection? Or have you been rejected for something that you thought was an absolute given? Sharing some insider insights and advice…

Recognise that there are many reasons for job rejection.

It’s hard not to take any form of rejection personally; particularly when you’re given all the cues that you’re a good fit for a role. However, rather than dwelling on what you’ve done wrong (which might not be anything!) focus on what could have gone right for someone else this time.

You see that we haven’t said what someone else has done right yet rather what’s gone right for them? For instance…

  • You could be super qualified and/or experienced, yet the selected candidate could be even more so or simply have one skill or bit of experience that you don’t (yet!).
  • You might have indicated that you’re looking for career progression when the interviewer knows that they can’t offer this and thinks you’ll soon be bored.
  • Your interviewer may really like your personality but feel someone else will slot in better with certain team members.
  • Your interview could have been great. But someone else’s interview may have flowed better.
  • It could be that there was barely anything between you and your competition and your interviewer simply went by instinct. In this case, perhaps you would have been the one selected on another day.

We could go on – and it could be a complete mix of the above/other factors!

But what if it happens over and over again?

This still doesn’t necessarily mean it’s personal. You could be looking for jobs within a particularly competitive industry or picking roles with unusually high application numbers.

Keep applying and keep applying well! Make sure you take the time to work on each application and interview. Plus, where possible, make sure you’re always seeking feedback on those roles that you didn’t get.

Your recruitment consultant should assist you in gaining interview feedback to help you with your future applications.

Ready to look for your next role? Visit our jobs page



Interview thank you letters – should you send them?

Should you send interview thank you letters when working with a recruitment agency?

It’s always great to see careers and recruitment topics featured in the mainstream media. One of the latest examples is Cosmopolitan’s focus on whether it’s appropriate to send job interview thank you notes.

There’s some really helpful advice within the piece. However, this particular article only applies to those interviewing directly with employers.

What about when your interview has been arranged via a recruitment agency?

In this case, it’s not appropriate to communicate directly with the interviewer/s, unless your consultant has specifically asked you to do so.

The client (your prospective employer) has chosen to work with a recruitment agency for a number of reasons. This is often partially due to time restrictions and wanting to ensure that there’s a dedicated person who’s committed to you throughout the selection process.

They will have arranged specific check-in points with your consultant, who remains your primary point of contact for interview feedback and similar.

So when will you receive your interview feedback…and when can you provide yours?

The specific timings will vary by business and agency. Most reputable agencies will take a proactive approach and want to hear from you soon after your client interview.

They’ll be interested to hear your perspective; this may include aspects such as…

  • How you felt the interview went
  • Your perceived connection with your interviewer/s
  • Any concerns you had regarding challenging questions or items that arose
  • Your interest in accepting the role if offered

Your consultant will also be in touch with the client at the soonest opportunity; as dictated by the employer’s availability.

Alongside relaying your feedback and interest in the role (where applicable), they’ll also gather the employer’s feedback. At this stage, it may be a case of awaiting further updates regarding second interviews or other selection processes.

Your consultant should advise you of the above. In certain circumstances (for instance, client holidays/travel or the need to await in-house meetings) it may be the case that there’s a bit of a wait before the client will enter their decision-making process. Your consultant should also keep you updated on this.

But what if you’d still really like to send interview thank you letters?

Even though it’s not appropriate to contact the client directly, there is another option! Why not email a thank you note via your recruitment consultant, detailing those aspects you would like to send on to the client? Revisit the Cosmopolitan piece for advice regarding the contents of this.

That way, your agency can relay your feedback via their email or phone conversations with the client.

This will still enable you to highlight your interest in the role and could help you stand out from your competitors.

Ideally, this should be sent to your consultant soon after your interview so that the experience is fresh in mind…and your feedback reaches the client before their decision is made.

Of course, before you get to the interview stage you need to apply for suitable vacancies! Here are the latest local opportunities.



What employers want – key candidate skills

What do employers want to see in their future team members and how can you demonstrate these abilities?

It’s always helpful to remember that (for the most successful companies!) the recruitment process is about far more than checking experience boxes. Business leaders are also looking for candidates that possess the appropriate skills to enhance their performance and complement the rest of the team.

One study has uncovered six such skills that employers want to see in their recruits:

  1. Adaptability (71.5%)
  2. ‘Resilience’ (57.5%)
  3. Being prepared to ‘upskill’ (39.7%)
  4. Being able to change (31.3%)
  5. Striking a ‘balance between work and personal life’ (29%)
  6. And networking skills (16.4%)

The first four skills all relate to the rapid pace of change now facing employers, as discussed on HR News.

This focus on change also cropped up in our recent post on the most wanted trainee skills – which is also relevant to non-trainees; especially those looking to enter a new sector!

How to demonstrate these skills:

As ever, you don’t want to treat these skills as CV or interview buzzwords so much as useful starting points.

Brainstorm examples that demonstrate how you’ve used these skills and what you’ve achieved as a result. Use these examples in your CV where relevant and practise discussing them in an interview scenario.

‘Relevant’ means you’re also tying your examples back to the skills and attributes required by each individual employer. I.e. you’re carefully reading individual job advertisements and specificiations and then tailoring your approach to match.

An interesting note on skill number three…

You’ll see that being prepared to upskill came in third place and this was discussed further in the HR News piece…

  • It suggests that 89.3% of employers are taking a ‘proactive approach’ to employee skills development for a variety of positive reasons. All sounds fantastic, yet this response is not supported by other research conducted on employees themselves.
  • In reality, only around 46% of professionals believe they are receiving adequate training. Advice for employees in this position can be found here.
  • Business owners may benefit from conducting some internal reviews to ensure that they’re not overestimating their skills development efforts. After all, this has long been a powerful staff retention tool.