Perks & pay: for employees earning less than £30K.

What’s more important, perks or pay for employees earning less than £30,000 a year? 

If you keep your eye on the jobs news, you’ll spot a common theme. Researchers always want to know more about your working values and how these compare to each other. The perennial question tends to include ‘what matters more to you, your salary or your…!’ (As a case in point, we recently reported on the topic of company culture versus salary level.)

Today’s source specifically explores the parity of the work benefits package and salary for the ‘under £30,000 workforce’.

Perks or pay?

In this instance, the title suggests that they’re ‘just as important’ as each other – and many of the employees surveyed place more weight on other work-life benefits.

  • 45% of respondents are happier when offered learning and development opportunities
  • 36% value flexible working hours, including ‘leniency in start times and/or breaks’
  • 26% already enjoy non-typical work schedules
  • ‘Frequency of pay’ is briefly mentioned as an additional motivator
  • Candidates are also eager to source jobs local to home (27%)

The income issue:

This sample explores the ‘Hidden Heroes’ workforce: those who earn an average salary of £16,403. This comprises employees in multiple sectors and across a variety of working ages.

So, from the above findings, you may think this group just isn’t as reliant on their income. However, many of the respondents express financial concerns.

  • Over 1/3 are ‘unsure or worried’ about covering their general bills
  • While 72% do not think they’d be able to fund ‘a large unexpected’ payment
  • Alongside this, 54% of this employee group report feeling ‘underpaid’
  • Millennials most often relate to feeling ‘overqualified’ (45%) for their roles
  • And the hospitality and catering industries contain the greatest number of workers who feel overqualified (54%)

What this tells us…

Employers looking to attract candidates for openings of this salary level would be smart to explore their wider benefits packages. What else could be offered to motivate and incentivise employees? Small changes could prove invaluable to professionals.

Naturally, extending benefit schemes across the entire workforce helps companies to maintain a competitive advantage.

For further recruitment advice, please call the office on 01225 313130. 



The employee experience: what matters now?

Employers should be more aware of the employee experience, suggests national research…

What is ’employee experience?’

Forbes defines this as “the sum of all interactions that an employee has with their employer during the duration of their employment relationship.”

This comprises an employee’s ‘feelings, emotions and perceptions’ regarding every experience they have along the way; starting right from the initial recruitment stage. It also includes daily interactions and the experience of eventually leaving an organisation.

Why is this such an issue?

Few UK employers are discussing the topic. Which also means that few businesses are managing to meet their employees’ changing expectations.

We know that 48% of employees have even left a role due to a job not meeting their expectations, so this could be a costly problem.

How could an employer improve their approach?

Company owners, business managers, and HR leaders need to have a good look at things from their team’s perspective, considering:

  • Recruitment activity: everything from interviews to keeping the candidate informed throughout the process.
  • Welcoming new team members: who does this and how efficient are initial training procedures?
  • Solving any ongoing issues, with an approachable point of contact for any concerns.
  • Whether the company is making the best use of technology.
  • Creating a pleasant work environment.
  • How staff members are recognised and rewarded for their work.
  • Ensuring individuals are treated well right through to their final days with the company.

Recognising and rewarding the team:

This is a vital area – and one that forms the focus of the People Management feature. Research shows:

  • 90% of people deem ‘recognition and rewards’ to be important to their employee experience.
  • 62% ‘hardly ever or never’ feel appreciated, yet 72% would ‘work harder’ if they did.
  • 48% of respondents say a ‘simple thank you’ makes them feel valued.

The article also recommends a more flexible approach. Rather than offering all employees the same incentives, businesses can find ways to provide truly attractive rewards. Ideas include flexible working and time off for childcare needs.

We’re delighted to support the first stage of your employee experience. Helping to make applicants feel welcome from their initial recruitment experience, providing regular updates, and keeping in touch with candidates through to the start of their employment with you. Please call the office on 01225 313130 for further advice.



Does your job title matter?

How important is your job title – and should(/can) you change your job title on your CV?

Recruiting Times has recently released a list of some of the newest job titles appearing on business cards. You might already know a people partner, graduate brainbox, or conversion optimisation wrangler, without even realising it.

After all, many of these titles are playful takes on existing roles. With the idea being to help employers attract new team members. Those in favour of title changes see them as part of an increased focus on employees’ skills and strengths. Conversely, those against them perceive the titles as a way of making ‘mundane roles’ sound better than they are; while paying less for people to do them!

Does your job title even matter?

Margaret Neale (a professor at Stanford Graduate School of Business) argues that job titles are a ‘signal both to the outside world and to your colleagues of what level you are within your organisation‘ and should embody part of your benefits package.

It’s something you might discuss and renegotiate in an appraisal context. Though you’ll want to carefully consider the way in which you approach this, as the above-linked post explains.

Think of your CV…

The Balance Careers also agrees that ‘job titles are badges of authority‘ and goes as far as to say that the wrong job title could ‘hinder your pursuit of future career opportunities’. So, it’s very much about obtaining the title that is most appropriate to your skills, experience and role wherever possible.

This all raises a number of additional considerations…

What if your job title doesn’t mean anything to outsiders?

  • Perhaps your title is one that’s exclusively used by your organisation and you’re now looking for a new role.
  • The simplest step is to state your role as it stands, then use two or three words to clarify your position to outsiders. For example, ‘Job Title: People Partner (HR Team)’.

What if your job title doesn’t even reflect your existing role? Or you don’t think it sounds ‘good enough’ to attract a new one?

  • Let’s not forget that embellishing a job title falls under the realm of CV fraud…and that CV fraud is a criminal offence!
  • You always want to make sure that what you state on your CV would be confirmed by your former employer on a reference.
  • Most of the time it would be best to simply state the title and then add further details to clarify the strength of your experience. You could also write a few lines to highlight your expertise in your cover email.
  • However, if your everyday role vastly differs from your title, you could highlight the organisation, team and duration, as per The Balance Careers advice. For example, ‘X Organisation, Finance Team – 3 years’. If you take this approach, tread carefully to ensure that you remain truthful regarding the details of your role. In other words, don’t make it sound as if you’re a finance manager when you’ve only undertaken entry-level responsibilities.
  • What’s more, be prepared to discuss your job title fully with your Recruitment Consultant and any prospective employers.

Ready to look for a new role? You’ll find the latest job vacancies here.



7 days of employee attraction tips!

Are your employee attraction strategies up to scratch? Check your progress against our top tips – we’ll be sharing something daily over the next week…

The latest skills shortage stats show just how vital this information is to employers. After all, you’re currently competing against a greater number of companies for a smaller number of candidates.

Ready to get started?

DAY 1: your culture and ethos

Could you (and your existing team) describe your company culture and brand values/ethos? If so, how do you promote this to prospective employees – is it on your website? Do you include any blurb on your job descriptions? If you answer ‘no’ to any of the above, it’s time to get brainstorming!

Working for brands with a positive purpose is becoming increasingly important to emerging generations of professionals.

Communicating your company culture can also help attract like-minded individuals to your business. And we all know the value of a positive team fit!

What’s more, well-aligned values also appear to boost later productivity and workplace relations. Please note: the ‘well-aligned’ is key here! It’s important that anything you communicate is truly reflected in your workplace. Whether that’s comments about the positive atmosphere, your people-centred approach, or your attitude to progression and diversity.

DAY 2: building your benefits package

You might not think you’re in the position to create much of an employee benefits package, however, you really don’t need to have a vast budget in order to do so. It could also be a costly mistake not to at least explore your options.

Where possible, detail some of your employee benefits in your job descriptions. 85% of candidates are more attracted to organisations that do this. Or, at the very least, make sure candidates know that there are a number of benefits on offer.

Do your competitor research to see what other companies are offering their employees. Also, swot up on the latest research surrounding job-seekers’ priorities. We reguarly share such news findings, including our recent post on what most employees want and need in 2019.

DAY 3: be more flexible

It’s time to discuss flexible working. Yes, this is featured in some of the staff benefit discussions, yet it more than deserves its own employee attraction spotlight.

People are increasingly drawn to companies that provide flexi-working opportunities. There are multiple plus points to consider here:

  1. It may help you attract large and in many cases untapped talent pools, such as maternity returners and working parents.
  2. Again, emerging worker groups are also more attracted to jobs with flexible and home working potential.
  3. Your team may become happier and your business may better keep up with rapidly changing workplace needs.
  4. What’s more, as the UK lags behind other nations in this respect, you may gain a distinct competitive advantage in your field.

DAY 4: be a rarity!

In order to attract the most valuable employees, you need to offer and promote something that few companies ever even consider.

Something that will also help retain your employees once on-board – and help overcome some of the most worrying national workplace trends (the employee performance crisis; high levels of disengagement and a general sense of unhappiness at work)…

This something is only offered by approximately 19% of businesses and is best described as ‘an experimentation culture’. It’s all about enabling your employees to share their ideas without criticism, actively encouraging innovation and creativity, and all-around greater team and individual involvement. You’ll need to have the right management approach in place to make this possible. You’ll also need to communicate this message to prospective employees. However, just think of the possibilities for your business!

DAY 5: make a path

Again, this is somewhat touched upon as an employee benefit. Yet did you know that 90% of UK employees deem training to be ‘vital to furthering their career?’ All the while, only 25% of HR professionals say their employers provide a ‘learning culture’.

You may not have the sort of business that enables a clear route of progression, yet you can certainly help your employees to see a path of personal progression and development. What a helpful tool to include in your job adverts.

As we’re now deep into a ‘skills economy’ period, it’s great to consider all training avenues – from online learning and knowledge sharing to in-house coaching and external courses. This is all discussed in the above-linked post.

DAY 6: now for the salaries!

It’s hard to deny that salary levels are important. UK employees are more motivated by pay than those of any other European country, with 62% of professionals saying that their salary is their primary driver to work.

In addition to this, average national salaries grew by 7.6% last year. This is driven by the skills shortage and saw a boost in December when candidate availability numbers fell again.

Make certain that your salary levels are as competitive as they can be to attract more job applicants. Monitor your competitors’ job adverts and be sure to seek salary guidance from your Recruitment Consultant.

DAY 7: bringing it all together

You’ve put in all the work to create an attractive employer offering, now you need to make sure you’re reaching out to as many candidates as you can; as effectively as you can!

This means crafting an appealing job description – and making sure that this is actually getting in front of your target audience.

Contact an expert recruitment agency in your industry for support with both elements. From job description guidance, through to regional industry insights, and ready access to the most effective candidate attraction tools, there are so many benefits to working with a dedicated recruitment consultant. They may even have the perfect person on their database waiting for a job such as yours!

Thanks for joining us for this week of tips. We hope you’re feeling ready to execute your newly refined employee attraction approach! To discuss your recruitment needs, please call Appoint on 01225 313130.



Working with Gen Z

This year, Gen Z employees are expected to outnumber their millennial peers in the workplace…

Generation Z refers to the population born from about 1996 onwards and it’s a group also referred to as the ‘post-millennials’.

Gen Z differs from other employee groups in a number of ways. Let’s review some of the key findings:

Gen Z: career predictions

Source: HR News

  • This could be a highly mobile employee group. More than 1/2 (55%) intend to hold their first professional role for less than 2 years.
  • Staff retention tools could make all the difference to Gen Z workers. In fact, more than 70% of employees would remain in their job for up to 5 years if certain benefits were in place.
  • The most popular benefits include training and mentorship opportunities (76%), flexible working options (63%), and the potential for home working (48%). Although, they may not always want to use the latter. We’ll return to this topic shortly!
  • Prospective employees also want to see more job details provided up-front in job descriptions (68%).

Gen Z: ‘dropping out’ of the recruitment process

Source: Recruiting Times

  • 18% of this staff group are currently ‘dropping out’ of existing recruitment processes.
  • Gen Z employees crave a more ‘personal connection’ with their employers. And a lack of this may prove a barrier to their job application and acceptance decisions.
  • New technologies may attract and engage these candidates throughout the recruitment process. This could include everything from interview tools to digital exercises and even online mentoring schemes.
  • Efforts towards meaningful engagement can help improve the candidate experience. Any negative insights could also be publicised via digital platforms.

Gen Z: politically and socially aware

Source: Independent

  • Generation Z’s business perceptions are highly influenced by recent ‘social, technological and geopolitical’ change.
  • Employees are more attracted to companies who prioritise ‘diversity, inclusion and flexibility’.
  • Alongside a focus on tolerance, businesses should resolve any issues surrounding pay levels and workplace culture.

Gen Z: blurred lines

Source: HR News

  • The boundaries between work and play may be fuzzier for post-millennial employees. Many (65%) perceive a ‘fun environment’ to be a core component of a positive workplace culture. Conversely, only 22% of Baby Boomers (workers aged 55 and above) agree.
  • It’s a sociable group and 81% say communal areas are important at work.
  • A mere 8% of workers think they would perform better working from home (whereas the national average is 20%).
  • Many candidates value friendships at work (43% versus 22% of Baby Boomers).

A reminder about age discrimination…

These are fantastic insights for employers looking to attract a diverse workforce. Naturally, this type of data will always be somewhat of a generalisation and it’s important to get to know the specific needs and wants of all prospective employees – something an expert Recruitment Consultant can assist with!

In addition, it’s also vital that businesses remain aware of age discrimination laws. LawDonut has one of the best FAQ guides we’ve seen on this subject.

For further staff attraction advice, please call the office on 01225 313130. Candidates can also search and apply for jobs here



Employers intend to invest in their teams

Two separate surveys highlight employers’ plans to invest in their teams; regardless of their economic expectations…

Survey 1: employers set to invest in new employees

Source: REC

Our first survey actually comes from our accrediting body, the REC. Confidence in the UK economy appears ‘negative’ for its fourth consecutive month. In figure terms, this equates to a survey score of -14.

However, despite this, hiring and investment plans remain positive and have even increased by a percentage point over the past month. Taking this particular score to +16.

  • 48% of businesses looking to hire permanent employees are worried that there will not be enough candidates available (+6%).
  • Likewise, 53% of those hoping to grow their temporary headcount are concerned about sourcing enough skilled staff.
  • The marketing, media and creative sectors are among the most affected by the skills shortage.
  • Overall, the number of companies planning to recruit agency staff within a short-term time frame has increased by 3% since October (to a total score of +19).

Neil Carberry of the REC suggests Brits are displaying their ‘pragmatic best’ in spite of their wider economic concerns – and are set to ‘invest in their own businesses to meet demand’.

These attitudes clearly reflect those of other sources, as recently discussed.

Survey 2: employers will continue to invest in staff benefits

Source: The CIPD via People Management

Looking to the next two years, most businesses (97%) additionally intend to either maintain or increase their employee benefits schemes.

  • 81% plan to spend the same amount.
  • 16% intend to increase their spend in this area.
  • Businesses predominantly wish to focus on professional development benefits (43%), including mentoring and secondments.
  • Health and wellbeing incentives, such as sick pay (29%), follow this.
  • 25% will mainly focus on financial schemes, including pensions and debt-related advice.

Once again, these figures are deemed promising when considering external economic factors.

Charles Cotton from the REC praises businesses for their efforts. He says ‘spending in these areas can help improve employee performance, and ultimately corporate performance.’

The two news items are extremely closely related, with benefits packages also providing valuable staff attraction tools.

Looking to recruit permanent or temporary staff? Call the office on 01225 313130. Candidates can apply for new jobs via the website, or upload a CV as a general applicant