Perks & pay: for employees earning less than £30K.

What’s more important, perks or pay for employees earning less than £30,000 a year? 

If you keep your eye on the jobs news, you’ll spot a common theme. Researchers always want to know more about your working values and how these compare to each other. The perennial question tends to include ‘what matters more to you, your salary or your…!’ (As a case in point, we recently reported on the topic of company culture versus salary level.)

Today’s source specifically explores the parity of the work benefits package and salary for the ‘under £30,000 workforce’.

Perks or pay?

In this instance, the title suggests that they’re ‘just as important’ as each other – and many of the employees surveyed place more weight on other work-life benefits.

  • 45% of respondents are happier when offered learning and development opportunities
  • 36% value flexible working hours, including ‘leniency in start times and/or breaks’
  • 26% already enjoy non-typical work schedules
  • ‘Frequency of pay’ is briefly mentioned as an additional motivator
  • Candidates are also eager to source jobs local to home (27%)

The income issue:

This sample explores the ‘Hidden Heroes’ workforce: those who earn an average salary of £16,403. This comprises employees in multiple sectors and across a variety of working ages.

So, from the above findings, you may think this group just isn’t as reliant on their income. However, many of the respondents express financial concerns.

  • Over 1/3 are ‘unsure or worried’ about covering their general bills
  • While 72% do not think they’d be able to fund ‘a large unexpected’ payment
  • Alongside this, 54% of this employee group report feeling ‘underpaid’
  • Millennials most often relate to feeling ‘overqualified’ (45%) for their roles
  • And the hospitality and catering industries contain the greatest number of workers who feel overqualified (54%)

What this tells us…

Employers looking to attract candidates for openings of this salary level would be smart to explore their wider benefits packages. What else could be offered to motivate and incentivise employees? Small changes could prove invaluable to professionals.

Naturally, extending benefit schemes across the entire workforce helps companies to maintain a competitive advantage.

For further recruitment advice, please call the office on 01225 313130. 



Choosing company culture over salary

Which is more important, your company culture or your salary? Why the former may mean more to job satisfaction…

Employers may think a competitive salary is all that’s needed to attract and retain talented team members. Yet, while salaries are clearly important, this way of thinking can be risky in times of skills shortage.

After all, the latest findings indicate that:

  • 57% of people believe their company culture has more of an effect on their job satisfaction than their salary level.
  • 75% would ‘consider’ an employer’s culture before even making a job application.
  • 63% think it’s one of the primary reasons they remain in their role.
  • And 70% of employees would start looking for a new job if their working culture ‘deteriorated’.
  • In addition, respondents favour businesses that represent a ‘clear mission and purpose’ (89%).

It’s not the first time we’ve read such stats. Back in the Spring, it was reported that employees would sacrifice their work-life balance in order to enjoy a positive environment.

Respondents even say they’d choose to work a 60-hour week rather than be a part of a business that ‘doesn’t value culture’.

What contributes to a positive company culture?

Business leaders will want to read this HR News post in full. In summary, there are many elements that contribute to a strong working culture. These include…

  • Respecting – and being fair to – the team
  • Displaying ‘trust and integrity’
  • A culture of teamwork
  • Being flexible/open to improvements
  • Using ‘pre-boarding’ strategies, such as workplace buddies and mentoring for soon-to-be employees
  • Providing continued support/guidance
  • Offering recognition and incentives
  • Flexible working opportunities
  • And strong working relationships (including those with management)

Recognition is also prioritised ahead of pay rises…

Once again, the above list calls to mind another research report.

  • More than 3/5 of employees would rather work for a company that expresses praise and thanks than to be paid 10% more without it.
  • Yet there’s a clear gap between hope and reality, as only 16% of managers think they’ve been given the tools and know-how to ‘recognise colleagues effectively’.

How do you learn more about an employer’s company culture?

Naturally, it can be hard to truly understand a business’s working culture until you’re actively a part of it. Yet there are some great clues to help you decide whether it’s the sort of place that you’d like to work…

  1. Have a really good look at the company’s website. This sounds obvious, but you’d be amazed at how many people just have a quick glance at the ‘about’ page. Take the time to really read what the business is highlighting about itself and its team.
  2. As well as reading the business’s latest news via their website and social feeds, see what others are saying about them. How do their employees talk about their work on Twitter, etc? Has anyone reviewed their experience of working for the company? The latter tends to be more common for larger regional/national employers. Of course, reviews can be subjective yet they can be helpful if you read them with a critical mind.
  3. Job advertisements can also provide some useful insights. Especially if there are mentions of team outings, company events, employee benefits, charity initiatives, etc.
  4. Search for the business in the actual news – whether local, national or industry publications.
  5. Use interviews as a chance to find out more about the working culture and environment.
  6. And, of course, don’t forget to ask your recruitment consultant for their insights. This is just one of the many benefits of working with an agency who specialises in your field.

Ready to discover a new company culture? Here are the latest jobs



Forced into side hustles

Why do employees opt to work in so-called side hustles? Is it by choice or is there something else forcing their decisions?

If you read our recent salary news roundup, you’ll know that more than 1/2 of professionals are finding it difficult to meet their financial needs on a monthly basis.

So, it’s of little wonder that the majority of people who undertake side jobs are motivated by the chance to earn more money.

The top motivations for side hustles are:

  1. To increase income (59.9%)
  2. For personal enjoyment (14.1%)
  3. To ‘improve a hobby’ (10.4%)
  4. For better job security (9.4%)
  5. Or to enter a new career (6.3%)

The fact that 67.7% of respondents could be willing to stop their side jobs if their employer increased their salary adds further proof of their financial incentive.

That said, the remaining 1/3 of respondents intend to eventually turn their side gig into their career role.

Should employees and/or their employers be concerned?

There are important considerations for all parties…

  • As the Onrec post suggests, employees should have a good look at their employment contracts before embarking on any side jobs. Many businesses place restrictions on work that can be completed out of office hours.
  • Naturally, employers need to promote productivity and will be concerned if their team members turn up unreasonably tired or distracted. There’s also the chance of competitive overlaps and even public relation problems.
  • Yet, as the piece also mentions, businesses need to do more to attract and retain their employees; particularly in a time of continued skills shortage. Where possible, increased salaries can help professionals to better balance their work and home needs.
  • Business leaders can consult their recruitment agencies for more guidance on achieving competitive and attractive salary packages. We’re delighted to assist local employers with their recruitment enquiries – please call the office on 01225 313130 for more information.
  • Employees who feel overwhelmed with balancing extra work alongside their careers should consider whether their day job is the right role for them. If they’re not able to negotiate a salary increase, they may find their earning potential is greater in a new role. Regularly reviewing local job opportunities can help you to gauge your salary potential.


Sustainability + staff retention

A focus on sustainability could increase employee retention rates for younger professionals…

Thankfully, topics such as recycling, sustainability, and climate are now well and truly in mainstream discussion. The public has voted the environment as the ‘third most pressing issue facing the nation‘ in a recent YouGov poll.

Brexit and health top the list. However, those in the 18 to 24-year-old age group actually place the environment as second behind Brexit (almost 1/2 of this group prioritise environmental concerns, versus 27% of the population as a whole).

So it’s not surprising to hear that younger professionals would like to see a greater environmental focus at work.

Exploring core priorities:

The article also explores a number of priorities regarding the work setting itself.

Ideas for individuals, employers and managers wanting to do more to support sustainability… 

  • Cultivating Capital has a list of 25 tips to help create a greener workplace. While an American post, it houses multiple ideas that could easily be adopted in the UK. Why not be the person that suggests some of these strategies in your business? Not only would this offer clear company benefits, yet it’s the sort of personal achievement that shines on your CV.
  • Business owners will also want to read all about the ‘environmental taxes, reliefs and schemes for businesses’ available via the gov.uk website.
  • For further inspiration, articles from the likes of the Telegraph and Forbes detail how some companies are achieving excellent environmental progress.
  • If your existing employer isn’t open to green initiatives, there may be another company that more closely fits your values. Don’t forget you can always ask more about an employer’s sustainability efforts and objectives during the recruitment process.

To explore openings in Bath and the surrounding area, please visit our jobs page. You will have the opportunity to ask more about recruiting companies if your CV is selected for possible submission. This is just one of the many benefits of working with an accredited recruitment agency



The employee experience: what matters now?

Employers should be more aware of the employee experience, suggests national research…

What is ’employee experience?’

Forbes defines this as “the sum of all interactions that an employee has with their employer during the duration of their employment relationship.”

This comprises an employee’s ‘feelings, emotions and perceptions’ regarding every experience they have along the way; starting right from the initial recruitment stage. It also includes daily interactions and the experience of eventually leaving an organisation.

Why is this such an issue?

Few UK employers are discussing the topic. Which also means that few businesses are managing to meet their employees’ changing expectations.

We know that 48% of employees have even left a role due to a job not meeting their expectations, so this could be a costly problem.

How could an employer improve their approach?

Company owners, business managers, and HR leaders need to have a good look at things from their team’s perspective, considering:

  • Recruitment activity: everything from interviews to keeping the candidate informed throughout the process.
  • Welcoming new team members: who does this and how efficient are initial training procedures?
  • Solving any ongoing issues, with an approachable point of contact for any concerns.
  • Whether the company is making the best use of technology.
  • Creating a pleasant work environment.
  • How staff members are recognised and rewarded for their work.
  • Ensuring individuals are treated well right through to their final days with the company.

Recognising and rewarding the team:

This is a vital area – and one that forms the focus of the People Management feature. Research shows:

  • 90% of people deem ‘recognition and rewards’ to be important to their employee experience.
  • 62% ‘hardly ever or never’ feel appreciated, yet 72% would ‘work harder’ if they did.
  • 48% of respondents say a ‘simple thank you’ makes them feel valued.

The article also recommends a more flexible approach. Rather than offering all employees the same incentives, businesses can find ways to provide truly attractive rewards. Ideas include flexible working and time off for childcare needs.

We’re delighted to support the first stage of your employee experience. Helping to make applicants feel welcome from their initial recruitment experience, providing regular updates, and keeping in touch with candidates through to the start of their employment with you. Please call the office on 01225 313130 for further advice.



How digital skills increase your salary

Are your digital skills as good as they should be? How increasing your technical abilities could make a great difference to your salary; regardless of your job role…

Before we discuss the salary side, it’s important to note that a lack of digital skills has long been an issue in the UK.

  • In fact, poor technical expertise is said to have ‘fuelled skills shortages‘ across the nation for the past 20 years.
  • 51% of today’s employers continue to experience unfilled vacancies as a result of this problem.
  • These unfilled vacancies also come at an annual cost of £63 billion.

It’s not just stereotypical tech roles that require digital skills…

  • Yourmoney.com reports that possessing the necessary skills could enhance your salary by an additional £12,500 per year.
  • You don’t need to be working directly within IT for this to be relevant to you. Currently, professionals working in ‘finance, insurance, and property’ display the greatest ‘digital literacy’.
  • However, there are many adults still struggling to undertake basic technical tasks. The Lloyds Bank Consumer Digital Index survey (which featured 1 million UK adults) finds that…
  • 21% of adults struggle to use search engines to find information;
  • 27% have difficulties in managing money online;
  • And 34% don’t have the basic knowledge to stay safe online.

Why are these numbers so high in such a digital era?

  • 8% of respondents haven’t even accessed the internet within the past three months – and 48% of this group is under the age of 60.
  • It appears personal finances are a factor, with 47% of those who’ve not accessed the internet recently falling into the ‘low income’ category.
  • Yet the absence of skill training is also significantly contributing to this issue. Most employees (63%) haven’t been offered any digital skills training by their employers.
  • This issue affects personnel of all levels. 54% of managerial employees are yet to receive technical skills training.

It may be time for employers to explore further training within their staff attraction and retention tools.

Meanwhile, employees looking to expand their abilities could consider free training courses. Lloyds Bank Academy has listed one such digital skills training programme.



Does your job title matter?

How important is your job title – and should(/can) you change your job title on your CV?

Recruiting Times has recently released a list of some of the newest job titles appearing on business cards. You might already know a people partner, graduate brainbox, or conversion optimisation wrangler, without even realising it.

After all, many of these titles are playful takes on existing roles. With the idea being to help employers attract new team members. Those in favour of title changes see them as part of an increased focus on employees’ skills and strengths. Conversely, those against them perceive the titles as a way of making ‘mundane roles’ sound better than they are; while paying less for people to do them!

Does your job title even matter?

Margaret Neale (a professor at Stanford Graduate School of Business) argues that job titles are a ‘signal both to the outside world and to your colleagues of what level you are within your organisation‘ and should embody part of your benefits package.

It’s something you might discuss and renegotiate in an appraisal context. Though you’ll want to carefully consider the way in which you approach this, as the above-linked post explains.

Think of your CV…

The Balance Careers also agrees that ‘job titles are badges of authority‘ and goes as far as to say that the wrong job title could ‘hinder your pursuit of future career opportunities’. So, it’s very much about obtaining the title that is most appropriate to your skills, experience and role wherever possible.

This all raises a number of additional considerations…

What if your job title doesn’t mean anything to outsiders?

  • Perhaps your title is one that’s exclusively used by your organisation and you’re now looking for a new role.
  • The simplest step is to state your role as it stands, then use two or three words to clarify your position to outsiders. For example, ‘Job Title: People Partner (HR Team)’.

What if your job title doesn’t even reflect your existing role? Or you don’t think it sounds ‘good enough’ to attract a new one?

  • Let’s not forget that embellishing a job title falls under the realm of CV fraud…and that CV fraud is a criminal offence!
  • You always want to make sure that what you state on your CV would be confirmed by your former employer on a reference.
  • Most of the time it would be best to simply state the title and then add further details to clarify the strength of your experience. You could also write a few lines to highlight your expertise in your cover email.
  • However, if your everyday role vastly differs from your title, you could highlight the organisation, team and duration, as per The Balance Careers advice. For example, ‘X Organisation, Finance Team – 3 years’. If you take this approach, tread carefully to ensure that you remain truthful regarding the details of your role. In other words, don’t make it sound as if you’re a finance manager when you’ve only undertaken entry-level responsibilities.
  • What’s more, be prepared to discuss your job title fully with your Recruitment Consultant and any prospective employers.

Ready to look for a new role? You’ll find the latest job vacancies here.



SMEs express recruitment confidence

How SMEs perceive their recruitment abilities – and how they’re looking to attract new employees. Plus what the rest of the employment market stats are saying…

SME stands for ‘small and medium-sized enterprises.’ This refers to any business with fewer than 250 employees. Together, these companies employ more than 16 million people, which accounts for half of the UK’s working population.

The findings show:

  • SMEs are confident in their abilities to recruit over the coming year; regardless of the wider business climate. 61% of these companies express this sentiment, versus 53% of global businesses.
  • Business owners are looking to increase their investments in training and development, alongside ‘demonstrating a commitment to ethical and social values’ in order to attract more employees.
  • Salary remains the most regarded employee attraction tool among business leaders, with the aforementioned training and development in second place.
  • Employers are no longer placing the same level of focus on ‘long-term service’, however, a ‘competitive salary’ is also deemed the most effective tool for promoting staff retention.

Each of these stats come from this Onrec report. The research itself was conducted by Oxford Economics in association with American Express.

What about the latest ONS labour stats?

Over on the REC website, it’s stated that the national unemployment rate is now the lowest it’s been since November 1974 to January 1975, at just 3.9%.

  • 32.72 million people of working age are now in employment. 475,0000 more people than over the previous year.
  • The number of job vacancies has also increased by 32,000 to a total of 852,0000 for January to March 2019.
  • As positive as these figures appear, this poses a continued challenge for employers looking to recruit new team members. The REC describes this as a ‘big risk’ to future economic growth.

How do these findings compare to the current KPMG and REC Report on Jobs?

  • These figures also reveal a ‘steep decline in staff availability.’ This is partially attributed to a ‘Brexit-related uncertainty’.
  • The Report on Jobs also suggests the ‘fastest decline’ in permanent employee placements since the middle of 2016.
  • However, these figures additionally show employee demand has increased at its ‘softest pace’ since August 2916 – both across temporary and permanent recruitment.

What does this all mean for you as a job-seeker or employer?

For job-seekers:

There are some fantastic opportunities out there for you. When you consider that 85% of local businesses are SMEs, their confidence becomes all the more newsworthy.

What’s more, these businesses are competing for people with the relevant skills, attributes and experience for their companies.

Low unemployment means you may experience reduced job-seeker competition in your field. However, you cannot rely on this! Appealing roles have a habit of attracting greater numbers. You must still ensure your CV and applications are doing all that they can to demonstrate your suitability for a job.

Take a look at the latest local openings and/or email your CV to our Consultants. Here’s what to include in your cover email.

For employers and managers:

The challenge of standing out from your competitors continues.

As per the SME discussions, employee attraction strategies are now of the utmost priority. The following posts share some useful considerations:

Work closely with your Recruitment Consultant to ensure they’re aware of your individual recruitment needs as well as your complete employee offering. Get the most out of the agency’s staff attraction tools, honed through years of recruitment expertise.

You can call an Appoint Consultant today on 01225 313130 or reach a Consultant directly via email.



The creative & innovative employee

How creative or innovative do you get to be on a daily basis? It’s important to remember that these words should apply to all industries and jobs, not just the artistic!

Creativity and innovation allow us all to work in new ways, formulate new ideas, and progress. However, employers and managers are overestimating just how much room they give their teams to use these skills.

Employees don’t feel able to be innovative at work…

  • 76% of business leaders believe they ’empower their employees to be innovative.’
  • However, only 34% of professionals feel encouraged in this way.
  • Yet 95% of businesses see innovation as imperative to their business growth and 91% of employees want the opportunity to be more innovative in their roles.
  • Employers are also misreading those tools that inspire creativity. They over-prioritise financial incentives and under-prioritise the role that ‘purpose’ plays in our work.
  • These findings (from Accenture, reported by HR Magazine) also reveal that staff specifically want appropriate skills development, flexible working opportunities, and a healthier work-life balance. Each aspect is believed to nurture greater innovation.

Tips for employers: each aspect features in our ‘7 Days of Employee Attraction Tips.’ See Days 3-5 for more advice. Make sure you’re also gathering genuine feedback from your employees. You don’t want to be among the managers who think they’re creating a culture that they’re not!

Good managers can spark creativity

It’s interesting to hear that managers can also increase creativity by using one essential skill – attentive listening.

  • In a separate international study, also shared by HR Magazine, employees expressed greater creativity when they felt listened to. Their workload was also of increased quality.
  • Conversely, distracted managers failed to promote such a response.
  • The article additionally highlights several flaws surrounding common brainstorming activities. Many people fear ridicule in response to sharing their ideas. Employees also worry about being the person that constantly offers up ideas in fear of annoying others.

There’s some sage advice for all managers; much of the focus needs to be paid to creating a more relaxed and informal culture that allows for ideas to be developed over time.

A brief note for stifled employees…

Where possible, share your ideas with your manager or a trusted colleague. You may be letting your fears get the better of you. Hopefully, your confidence will soon increase alongside your enjoyment of your role.

However, in instances where you’ve repeatedly tried and still feel stifled, or you simply fancy a change of scene, your skills may be better used elsewhere. You can read and apply for the latest jobs here.



Is your salary the most important factor?

Investigating whether your salary is the most important of all the job benefits. What else appeals to today’s job-seekers and what’s so important about this research?

Let’s start with the importance of this topic. As we mentioned in our last post, job vacancy numbers have reached an all-time high. This means that each employer has to work all the harder to impress suitable applicants.

This also means that there are regular surveys to ascertain which factors are most likely to attract a candidate into a new role. Surveys such as the one behind the ‘Attracting the Right Talent – Meeting Demands through the Job Offering Report.’

Salary isn’t (necessarily!) the most important factor…

  • At present, just over 1/3 of the nation’s professionals say their ‘career expectations are not being met’. They most prioritise…
  • Working for an employer that ‘values you’ (25%)
  • The opportunity to gain experience (17%)
  • Creating a strong work-life balance (18%)
  • And developing personal technical skills and abilities (11%)

Those that had worked for their employer for more than five years were even more likely to rate feeling valued and work-life balance as most important.

Alongside this, 60% of people prioritise the chance to develop their career within their job role.

You’ll see salary is yet to be mentioned. However, there is some regional variation here. In the South, workers are more likely to prioritise the career and lifestyle factors mentioned. Whereas the majority of professionals in the North East and Midlands valued their salary above all else.

There’s also some sector difference. The banking and financial services industry was the only sector that specifically regarded a pay rise as their primary career priority.

The report says there’s been a marked shift in attitudes due to the ‘millennial impact’. This group of workers is placing greater importance on lifestyle elements beyond pay rates.

What does this all mean?

We can see that attitudes are changing. However, it’s not long ago we heard that the UK is more salary-minded than any other European country and that 62% of people primarily work for this reason.

It’s worth considering the research as a whole. Salaries are incredibly important to many workers, yet there are also plenty of other factors that are relevant to job searching…and the acceptance of job offers.

  • As a candidate: it’s useful to consider your own priorities. What matters most in your career right now? Be sure to let your Recruitment Consultant know what you’re looking for. You can include some of this information right from your first email to your agency.
  • As an employer: take a look at your employee attraction offering. Are you making your team feel valued, do you help to create a positive work-life balance, and are you ensuring your staff receives regular skills development? What’s more, are you communicating these messages in your job advertisements? This post will help you to sharpen your employee attraction strategy.

For specialist recruitment support, please call the office on 01225 313130. Further details are available on our Contact page