New year, new career? Career change advice.

Is 2020 your year for an entirely new career? Advice for anyone looking to make a change of direction…

This post marks the last in our January special – completing our series of 8 features (plus an extra LinkedIn post!) designed to inspire and support your 2020 career goals. You’ll find all the links to the rest of the features at the end of this article.

Today, we turn our attention to career change advice. Or how to pave your way into a totally new role or industry!

Our top tips to help you enter a new career…

  • Start where you are: create a list of all your core transferable skills. These are the skills that you’ve developed that can easily be transferred over to your target industry. If possible, ask former (or trusted current!) colleagues and associates to describe your skills. You may discover a few additions for your list.
  • Look at what’s needed: have an ideal job in mind? Regularly read job ads to see what employers are actually looking for. Revisit your transferrable skills list to see if there’s anything else you can add.
  • See what you can brush up on: spot a core skill or insight that you really need to develop? Consider how you can swot up in your spare time. For instance, there may be a particular qualification or short course that’s respected in your prospective new field. Always keep your budget and time constraints in mind.
  • Get practical: perhaps there are additional responsibilities you can take on in your current role, some voluntary work you can do, or even paid weekend and/or evening work available in your ideal industry. Not only will this help enhance your CV, yet it’ll also demonstrate initiative. Remember to pace yourself and respect your mental and physical health needs if you’re already working.
  • Top things off: there’s nothing to stop you from conducting your own research project in your target field. Create case studies and recommendations and show prospective employers you’ve considered some of the problems they’re facing.

Once you’ve done this, it’s time to…

  • Update your CV: weave all of the above into your CV which, as ever, should be tailored for the individual roles that you apply for. Highlight each skill, course, responsibility, and achievement that makes your application relevant to the employer’s role. Furthermore, detail real-life examples that illustrate each point.
  • Watch out for simple steps: often, there’s a logical ‘next step role’ that will take you closer to your destination. For instance, a position that merges some of your current responsibilities with those you’re looking to develop. Or a position along a similar career path yet within your target industry. These simple steps often offer your most accessible route into a new career.
  • Seek the support of a professional: 85% of UK businesses specifically value agency expertise when recruiting in their sector (according to the REC, January 2020). Plus the best recruitment agencies will offer you honest and valuable advice regarding your suitability for their vacancies. The REC Member directory tool is a great place to start; we’re proud to be accredited REC compliant members.
  • Allow yourself some time: remember, career changes are rarely immediate. Prepare to consider your steps and possibilities and allow yourself to look forward to the opportunities ahead!

Read the rest of our January series:

  1. The series introduction, including why this focus has been so essential
  2. 6 personal traits that could speed up your New Year job search success
  3. Promising news for beating the New Year blues and SAD
  4. How and when to ask for a pay rise in 2020
  5. Answering that big question – do you really need a career plan?
  6. 4 signs that you’ve found, or are, the right candidate for the job
  7. How to mentally prepare for each job search phase
  8. And, over on LinkedIn, how to develop Gravitas whatever your job level

Just because this series has come to a close, doesn’t mean you have to miss out! We’ll keep sharing expert career news and advice via our News page. You can also connect with us on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn and/or register your CV for local opportunities



The year of the pay rise!

How and when to ask for a pay rise this year…

If you’ve read any of our January posts so far, you’ll know that we’re dedicating this month to positive and supportive features to help you achieve your career plans.

You can catch up with our previous posts here:

  1. Our introduction to the series and why it’s so necessary
  2. The employee traits that could speed up your job search success
  3. Good news for beating the New Year blues and SAD

If achieving a pay rise is top of your new year plans, then this feature is for you!

Today’s story comes from Adzuna; as published by HR News. Adzuna has shared a four-step plan to help increase your chance of increasing your salary this year!

We’ll also share some tips from other experts on this subject.

Why January could be the best time to ask for a pay rise

The article states that the average 2019 salary actually reached its peak last January. Adzuna reports that salaries almost reached an average of £35,000 per annum during that period and for the only point that year.

For this reason, they suggest that this could be the month for you to get the process started. We’ll return to this topic in one of their steps below.

The four-step plan includes…

  1. Evaluating your performance
  2. Standing out from the crowd
  3. Careful timing
  4. Preparing for a ‘no’

Evaluating your performance:

  • Take the time to evaluate your achievements against your targets and responsibilities.
  • Select examples that clearly demonstrate business benefits.
  • Consider how your examples show that you’ve gone beyond your current role and have truly earned the possibility of a pay increase.

Standing out from the crowd:

  • Essentially, this involves finding ways to accept as many internal opportunities as you can – from training to projects – to show that you are more positive and proactive than your colleagues.
  • Also ensure to highlight your current soft skills and those you’re working on. Even if you’re not actively job searching, you can refer back to our post on these essential skills.

Careful timing:

  • Don’t think you have to wait for your next appraisal to open your salary conversations. Remember, January could be a prime time for such discussions.
  • However, you do want to make sure you’re ready to make a strong case. Aim to follow all of the above advice as thoroughly as you can before speaking to your manager or boss.

Preparing for a ‘no:’

  • As the article suggests, it’s vital to mentally prepare for your request to be rejected. And it doesn’t mean it’s personal if it is! The company may not be in the position to make any increases at this time, may have another date in mind, or may prefer to wait until they can offer pay rises to all team members.
  • Of course, there’s also the chance that your case isn’t quite strong enough right now. Seek out your manager or employer’s feedback.
  • You can always ask when an increase could be more realistic and/or whether there are any alternative rewards that could be negotiated at this time.

Some extra tips…

  • When considering your timing, don’t forget to review your situation so far. Are you new to the company and/or have you already received a pay rise within the past 12 months? One BBC expert recommends holding off if so.
  • Sometimes the biggest pay rises come from new employers. Resolution Foundation has found that employees who remained with their employer (in 2018) could predict a pay rise of ‘0.6% a year after inflation’. Conversely, those who make a job change can expect a typical rise of 4.5% in their first year following the switch – which is seven times the amount.
  • Focus on your productivity and inspire and encourage your colleagues to do the same. Resolution Foundation also found that it’s the times when Britain is performing productively that we receive the greatest pay rises!

Don’t forget to keep an eye on our jobs page so you can benchmark your salary against the latest openings. Regularly reading job descriptions can also help you better understand the skills and expertise that you’ll need to take you to that next salary level!



A year of big change & a positive start!

2020 looks set to be a year of big change for employees and businesses.

We’re dedicating the next month to a number of positive news posts to help inspire your 2020 career plans. We’ll explore everything from personality traits to coping with SAD, pay rises, career changes, and the value of career plans themselves.

Before the series officially launches tomorrow, we’re going to focus on why such a focus is necessary…

Big change is ahead!

The latest findings suggest that:

  • Around 1/2 of British employees plan to change jobs this year.
  • This could come at a cost of approximately £195 to businesses each day.
  • In addition, businesses are already struggling to recruit with unemployment levels remaining exceptionally low.

As for the customer services industry…

  • Almost 40% of customer service professionals intend to find a new role.
  • January is considered the worst month of the year for this group’s happiness levels.
  • As a result, 5% of respondents will leave their customer service job this month alone. This figure may not sound vast, yet could cost UK businesses £201,757,500 in January!

Employers are already worried:

  • Only last month 2/5 of business leaders reported a ‘constant battle’ with staff retention.
  • Almost 1/2 of HR professionals expect to lose 10% of their team during any business year.
  • What’s more, 14% of the nation’s new recruits leave their roles within their first 30 days, and 39% do so within the first six months.

Let’s turn to some positives…

If more professionals make these job moves as planned, more candidates will be available for existing and new job opportunities. This could help to shake up the skills shortage the UK has experienced over recent years.

What’s more, the research data also presents some additional (and valuable!) insights.

  • The study that said 1/2 of British people will change jobs this year also identified the number one employee retention tool – working for a company with a purpose. Or ‘the positive reason the organisation exists, what drives it forward and what it stands for.’
  • A separate study found that 90% of employees working for businesses with ‘clearly defined and motivational purposes’ feel engaged at work. That’s 58% more employee engagement than companies that don’t have clear and positive purposes!
  • On the customer services side, it’s found that employee retention levels can be enhanced through ‘regular and timely feedback, non-financial rewards, and healthcare and flexitime.’ Pay rates also hold influence for 53% of these respondents.

If you’re reading this as a current or prospective job-seeker…

  • This sort of research data has multiple benefits for your job search. Firstly, it’s helpful to know what other employees prioritise as it can help you understand and clarify your own goals.
  • You may also feel it’s time for you to seek out a company with a greater purpose, or you may be looking to work with more likeminded people, increase your salary, and/or seek experience in a new sector. There are no rights and wrongs – these are your career goals!
  • In addition, knowing that application numbers may increase can you help you focus your efforts on those roles you are most interested in.
  • Visit our jobs page to apply for the latest opportunities. You can also upload your CV here.

If you’re reading this as an employer or manager…

  • You can also use this data to your advantage. Even if you know your business serves a positive purpose, you need to find ways to clearly communicate this to your team (and any customers or clients you serve).
  • It’s helpful to review your staff retention levels and strategies as a whole. Ever high or increasing employee turnover levels often indicate something is going wrong – whether that’s down to an unhappy working environment, absent staff retention strategy, or even recruiting the wrong people in the first place.
  • Even businesses used to steady staffing levels will likely see an increase in employee departures if the above stats ring true. This knowledge can help you get prepared and proactive in your recruitment plans.
  • Be sure to find a trusted recruitment partner to support you. For further advice, please call the office on 01225 313130.

We hope you all enjoy this month’s features and it helps you start your own year of big changes! 



Building your transferable skills

By now, you’ve probably heard a lot about transferable skills. Yet how easily can you identify yours and do you know how to build them?

What makes a skill transferable?

The term applies to any key skill or attribute that you can carry from one job to the next.

While vital for us all, they become especially imperative for those that are…

  • Only just embarking on their career
  • Entering a new industry
  • Looking to make a major job change
  • Returning to work after a career break

Each of these groups may have to work that bit harder to demonstrate their suitability for a job role. So, rather than describing the skills gained from a recent job, they will illustrate their transferable skills gathered from elsewhere.

Example skills include:

All those personal attributes that spring to mind when highlighting the best of your abilities, including:

  • Communication
  • Teamwork
  • Perseverance
  • Project management
  • Reliability
  • Organisation
  • Budgeting
  • Record keeping
  • Research
  • IT and technical

As you can imagine, this list could become extensive and will certainly vary by individual.

Where do you develop transferable skills?

You develop these attributes over time and through a variety of professional and personal duties. For instance:

  • Your career roles to date
  • ‘Non-career’ jobs, such as part-time positions undertaken during your studies
  • Professional associations
  • Work experience placements
  • Voluntary roles
  • Hobbies and interests
  • Training courses
  • Travel
  • And caring responsibilities

Communicating your skills:

If there’s one tip that you take away from this piece, it’s this: make it relevant!

Employers want to see how closely you match the needs of their business and how well you’d ‘fit’ within their job role.

Spotted a job you want to apply for?

  1. Highlight the skills that the employer is looking for, then brainstorm all the ways that you’ve used these to date. Refer to the list above to prompt your recall.
  2. Compile specific examples to illustrate how you’ve used these skills in practice – and how you’ve used them to someone’s benefit. How has it helped your employer or voluntary organisation, colleagues, teammates, peers or personal/career development? Have these skills led to any specific achievements? Revisit our last post for more advice on how to showcase these.
  3. Weave your findings throughout your CV; include these in your personal profile, key skills summary and employment history. You can even highlight some of the most relevant skills in your cover letter or email.
  4. Finally, get in the habit of regularly reading job listings so you can quickly identify the most common key skills needed within your industry. See how you can build more of these both in and out of work.


UK faces employee performance crisis

If you take a look back over the past 12 months, how would you rate your employee performance? Are you giving your job your all, or do you know that you’re contributing far from your best?

The nation may be facing an employee performance crisis, with more than 1/4 of people knowingly underperforming at work. This particular stat comes from research conducted on more than 15,000 European and UK workers (as discussed by People Management).

Findings also reveal:

  • 1/3 of people do not feel stimulated by their job.
  • 2/5 additionally don’t believe they’re undertaking ‘meaningful’ tasks at work.
  • The UK is also falling behind the rest of Europe, where only 1/5 of employees believe they’re underperforming.

Why are employee performance levels so poor?

In addition to craving more meaningful roles, it appears that a lack of ongoing skills development may lead people to feel dissatisfied and rest on their laurels. Advanced IT training (61%) and problem-solving skills coaching (35%) are both cited as possible motivating factors to increase job satisfaction.

Of course, the individual motivators will vary by business and team. Which is why employers are also encouraged to get to the root of productivity problems within their own companies. Further advice is given in the piece.

Are professionals dreaming of other jobs?

These stats also call to mind a story shared by The Independent. There, we hear that 90% of people are not currently working in their dream job. What’s more…

  • 2/3 of employees don’t think they would be successful in achieving their ideal role.
  • Millennials represented the most optimistic survey group, with 64% thinking they could secure it within about six years.
  • The women most want to be authors (replacing the teachers of previous studies), while men hope to be ‘entrepreneurs’ (in lieu of their prior footballing aspirations).
  • People are most discouraged by a ‘fear of failure’ and/or lack of financial buffer.
  • Some simply do not know how they’d break into their target industry. Others are waiting for a different time in their life to attempt it, such as after becoming parents.

What these findings mean for you

Know that your own employee performance levels are lacking? It’s time to ask yourself why! Do you crave the chance to do a spot of training and update your skills? Are you feeling ready to leap into that long-imagined career (the one that always features in your party chat!)? There’s a good chance that you sit somewhere in-between and feel ready for that next step in your career.

If this is the case, it’s a great time to start looking at what’s out there. Employers are urgently seeking fresh skills for a variety of fantastic opportunities. You’ll find the latest jobs listed here.

To discuss your recruitment needs, please call the office on 01225 313130.