Bath is one of the UK’s most woke cities!

Bath is one of the UK’s most woke cities in which to live and work…

For those less familiar with the term, the word ‘woke’ originates in American slang. The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines this as being “aware of and actively attentive to important facts and issues (especially issues of racial and social justice).”

To this end, it’s often used interchangeably with other words that describe progressive attitudes and behaviours.

How do you measure a city’s woke status?

Bankrate has ranked 50 cities across seven specific categories, which include:

  1. Google search trends: how frequently the city’s web users have searched for the followings terms over a 5-year period:  ‘LGBT’, ‘Fair Trade’, ‘Volunteering’, ‘Climate Change’, ‘Feminism’, ‘Protest’, ‘Sustainability’, ‘Charity’, ‘Human Rights’ and ‘Politics’.
  2. The gender pay gap: the disparity between wages for men and women.
  3. Recycling rates: the quantity of household waste that is recycled.
  4. Voter turnout: comparing ‘the size of each electorate with the total number of votes in the 2017 General Election.’
  5. Vegan & vegetarian: from the perspective of a reduced carbon footprint; counting the number of exclusively vegan and vegetarian eating establishments.
  6. ULEV registration: the number of vehicles registered as ‘ultra-low emission’, which usually refers to ‘electric or hybrid cars.’
  7. Council diversity: exploring the representation of women and minority groups in local government.

Full details of each category and data sources can be found on the Bankrate site.

How progressive is Bath?

Bath is officially the third most woke city in which to live and work, according to this assessment scale. The city receives a total score of 22.31.

Only Oxford and Brighton & Hove achieve greater progressiveness scores, reaching 23.82 and 23.33 respectively.

Bath performs especially well for its:

  1. Recycling rates: achieving a score of 4.6/5. This surpasses Oxford’s 4.2 and Brighton’s 2.4.
  2. Vegan/vegetarian establishments: 4.5/5. Brighton achieves a perfect 5 for this aspect, however, Oxford falls behind with 3.5.
  3. Voter turnout: 3.9/5. Mirroring Oxford (3.9) and only just behind Brighton (4).
  4. ULEV registration: 3.7/5. Beating Brighton’s 2.6 and scoring only marginally less than Oxford’s 3.8. 

However, Bath still needs to work on its:

  1. Council Diversity: 0.6/5: the city’s weakest ranking. Oxford and Brighton, however, each only achieve scores around 2/5 for this element. Wolverhampton, in contrast, receives a 4.3.
  2. Gender Pay Gap: 2/5: this was a low-scoring area for each of the top three cities. None of which even reach a 3/5. Swansea, however, receives an impressive 4.1/5 for its minimal pay gap.
  3. Google Search Trends: 3.1/5: Bath residents and professionals could use the Internet for more progressive means! Brighton & Hove achieves its second perfect score (5/5) for this aspect, yet Oxford also has work to do with its 3.4.

Interestingly, if it wasn’t for the Council Diversity ranking, Bath (21.8) would beat both Oxford (21.4) and Brighton & Hove (21.3). Please note: we haven’t totted up the scores for the rest of the cities to see how else the rankings would change.

Want to work in a woke city?!

We’re proud to have recruited for businesses in Bath and the surrounding area since 1999. You’ll find the latest local job openings listed here.



What employees want & need in 2019

Do you know what most employees want from their employers?

It’s always interesting to see how your daily hopes differ from those of your colleagues. Of course, if you’re the employer it also becomes rather beneficial to know those factors that could be getting your team down.

Sometimes, the least expected concerns may be those that top the list. This could be said for the leading ‘want’ in Viking’s data, compiled from nearly 14,000 respondents…

What most employees want:

  1. Greater information regarding the possible health implications of their daily ‘display screen equipment’ use and sedentary working ways.
  2. Increased mental health and work stress support.
  3. Mental health training for all managers.
  4. Remote working opportunities.
  5. Protected lunch breaks…so employees actually get to take them.
  6. A four-day working week; working longer days Monday to Thursday to accommodate this.
  7. More artwork throughout the office space – to lift moods and reduce stress.
  8. Guidance on social media policies.
  9. Efforts to reduce ‘annoying office habits’.
  10. And for employers not to ban social media use (believing that this would actually hinder productivity).

It’s well worth reading the full piece on the Viking Blog to see all the supporting stats. Alongside those irritating office habits that make 41% of people want to leave their jobs!

Elsewhere, employers are reminded of another specific need…

HR Magazine has a thought-provoking post regarding the impact of fertility issues on employees. A conversation that is rarely discussed in HR and recruitment media.

The feature highlights the emotional challenges experienced, as well as the logistical problems posed by treatment appointments and medication needs.

It also provides some well-informed suggestions for employers and HR professionals.

Now, what do you really want or need from your job?

This is a fantastic question to ask yourself at the start of a New Year. What would make your Monday mornings brighter in 2019? Do you look forward to a new challenge or setting? Have you outgrown your existing role and/or do your skills exceed your salary?

If the answer is ‘yes’, you’ll want to keep a close eye on our news and jobs!