Overcoming the Sunday Scaries

Do you suffer from the Sunday Scaries? If so, you’re one of the 2/3 of Britons experiencing the same…

This term, also regularly interchanged with the ‘Sunday Blues’ and the ‘Sunday night fear,’ describes the poor mood and/or anxiety that sets in ahead of the new working week.

It’s been found that many workers lose most of their Sundays to their work-based worries. Unresolved work tasks, thoughts of horrible commutes and unpleasant colleagues currently top the list of concerns.

People are engaging in a number of numbing behaviours in response to this. Alcohol and junk food appear to be among the common distraction tools.

Why are so many people affected by the Sunday Scaries?

Unsurprisingly, poor job satisfaction levels appear to be at the root of the phenomenon. It’s stated that more than 2 million British workers actually think about leaving their jobs daily. That’s 7% of the national workforce.

Professionals are experiencing high levels of stress and feel the burden of their employer’s expectations and workloads.

The evidence also shows that many people are working weekends and when they should be on leave.

How to overcome the Sunday Scaries…

Learn to recognise what’s under your control. If there’s something you can change – such as planning more enjoyable activities for your weekend – then do what you can to change it!

The same applies to anything under your control at work. Can you speak with someone about your workload, is there another method of travel you can use, is there anything you can do to improve your workplace relationships?

On a personal note, make sure you’re supporting your physical and mental health as best as you can.

Each change adds up! We hope this advice helps. If you’re ready for a fresh start, our Jobs page is the place to begin! Meanwhile, let us know how you overcome your Sunday anxiety over on Twitter, Facebook & LinkedIn



What the average working day looks like

Does your average working day reflect the national norm?

Read any business interview and you’re likely to hear that ‘every day is different.’ While largely true, it appears that there are some common working patterns.

The average working day in Britain now features: 

  • 8.5 hours spent working and commuting (Accounting for 35% of each working day. This equates to a 37-hour working week. Our commutes also happen to be the longest in all of Europe, averaging an hour per day).
  • Sleeping (28% of each working day…but of course, we’re now out of office hours!).
  • Leisure or personal activities (24%).
  • Unpaid work and ‘miscellaneous tasks’ (12.5%).

These stats were reported by HR News. Almost 1/2 the national workforce additionally undertakes some work en route to the office or while on their way home.

What type of unpaid work and miscellaneous tasks are people doing?

This section refers to everyday tasks or chores, including cooking, housework and caring responsibilities.

  • The average man spends 2.3 hours a day on unpaid tasks, with women contributing 3.6 daily hours. This creates a collective average of 2.9 hours.

There’s also a gender disparity when it comes to the value of work being undertaken during this time. Women’s out-of-office tasks are said to comprise higher value activities.

How do people spend their leisure time?

It appears that the nation is favouring solitary activities – and it’s suggested that this may be in response to our high-tech and ‘interconnected’ lifestyles.

  • Watching TV, listening to music and reading currently top the list of leisure activities.
  • Men are more likely to opt for watching TV or films, whereas women are likelier to pick a meal out with friends or indulge in a relaxing hobby, according to this particular study pool.

And are we getting enough sleep?

Even though it’s the second item on the average working day list, the answer is ‘no.’ What’s more, it’s this topic that is perhaps of greatest interest to the study’s authors – Mattress Online!

  • The most popular time to go to bed is between 11pm-12pm.
  • Men are more likely to go to bed sooner, selecting 10-11pm. Whereas women are more inclined to choose somewhere between 12-1am.
  • The British average is 6.8 hours of sleep, just shy of the recommended 7-9 hours.

So, how closely do you match the average? Let us know by TwitterFacebook and LinkedIn.

Want to boost your workplace wellbeing levels? Head straight to our last post!