New job considerations

What tops your list of new job considerations? Here’s what the rest of the UK is saying…

Today marks the start of National Careers Week. In honour of the occasion, a new survey has explored the most important elements people consider when making a job change.

The top new job considerations are said to include…

  1. Salary level (64%)
  2. Working hours (55%)
  3. Location (50%), tied with personal interest or enjoyment (also 50%)
  4. Job security (40%)
  5. The working environment (37%)
  6. Progression opportunities (26%)
  7. Training/skills development opportunities (23%)
  8. The opinions of your family or partner (12%)
  9. Status (9%)

What makes this survey stand out?

Firstly, it’s interesting to see some research that explores the holistic nature of work. At first glance, you may think this is simply a list of work perks. However, the study also encompasses some of the more psychological and interpersonal elements, such as the opinions of others and our perceived status.

This is refreshingly honest, although it’s also great to see that some of the more individual elements such as job enjoyment come much higher.

It also supports other recent recruitment news findings. Examples include…

How is this data relevant to you?

  • As a job-seeker: it’s another example of the questions you can ask yourself ahead of your job search. Understanding your own priorities can really help you decide where to focus your attention – and, of course, which jobs to apply for. For instance, if you know personal enjoyment sits far higher than salary for you, then there’s little point in applying for a role that doesn’t spark some interest. Or if your work is all about paying the bills, you’ll want to stay loyal to your initial salary range.
  • As an employer: it’s always helpful to remember what candidates are looking for. Each candidate will have their own order of priorities and these can change throughout their careers. While you may not be able to lead the way on every front, see which of these aspects you can highlight throughout your recruitment activity and, for that matter, which aspects you could introduce or build on in the future.

Don’t forget to keep an eye on our News page for regular recruitment news and advice features. You can also connect with us over on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn and/or register your CV for local opportunities



How to prep for each job search phase

How to mentally prepare for each job search phase…

As we enter the last week of the month (which also brings the final posts in our special January series), it’s time to prepare for each phase of your job search. Today’s advice comes from Kourtney Whitehead, via Forbes.

Most career advice articles largely focus on the practical side of job hunting, from CV writing to interviews. All very necessary! However, it’s rare to find articles that explore the emotional and mental aspects of your search.

After all, as Whitehead suggests, job searches can be long and stressful at times. Particularly if you’re searching for roles in a new field or you work within a particularly competitive industry. Yet a little bit of mental prep can help you feel far more in control and may minimise some of the stress along the way.

Prepping for each job search phase…

1. Getting started

This is described as the easiest phase, due to your increased levels of energy and optimism. As Whitehead says, “few things in life will transform your daily experience faster than finding a new job.”

The first phase starts as soon as you’re actively working on your job search, for instance updating your CV and LinkedIn profile.

Your first mental challenge: fighting the urge to procrastinate. Fear of rejection may stop you from getting going as quickly as you could. The advice is to get started ASAP so as not to extend your search. Don’t let your CV efforts delay you either – focus your attention on tailoring your CV to the most appealing roles, as well as checking for errors.

Tip: don’t get too bogged down in how your CV looks either. A clean and classic layout is often far more reader-friendly than a heavily designed format. Visit our downloads page for more straight-forward CV Advice.

2. Finding leads

This is the most time and energy-intensive aspect phase of your job search. It’s now that you’ll be making contact with prospective employers via jobs boards, recruitment agencies, and similar. You may also soon be fielding calls and juggling interview requests.

Your second mental challenge: reaching out to others for help and being prepared for applications and conversations that don’t lead to results. This phase can leave job-seekers feeling ‘vulnerable’, yet it’s also the stage that Whitehead describes as “the bridge between dreaming for a new job and having your chance to sell yourself during an interview.”

She reminds that this is also the longest stage for most job-seekers. Again, the advice here is to prepare for these feelings and press on.

Tip: finding an expert recruitment consultant that you can really trust and open up to may help reduce some of that vulnerability (as well as giving you access to industry insights and some of the best local employers in your field!). The REC member directory is a great place to start, alongside checking Testimonials and Google Reviews.  

3. Converting opportunities

It’s now that you’re attending interviews, which can prove stressful for many candidates.

Your third mental challenge: second-guessing every aspect of your interview performance. This may include replaying your interview questions and answers on repeat in your mind and picking yourself apart for every perceived wrong.

Whitehead suggests that before each of your interviews you “promise yourself that you will do your best and then choose to be satisfied with wherever that leads you.”

Tip: remember, even if you’ve just been rejected from a role, it doesn’t mean you’ve done anything wrong. Seek feedback where you can (your Recruitment Consultant should assist with this) and move on to the next opportunity.

4.  The negotiations

This is the stage where you’ve received a job offer yet may be faced with a negotiation. You’ll see that many job vacancies indicate a salary range as opposed to a single salary figure. The end offer tends to depend on your experience level.

Your fourth mental challenge: facing negotiations when your salary worth perceptions differ from your prospective employer’s. You may feel pressure and anxiety around your abilities to negotiate and/or the fear of losing the opportunity.

Whitehead advises against undervaluing yourself and failing to negotiate at this stage.

Tip: before applying for roles, it’s worth having a really honest discussion with your Recruitment Consultant about your salary expectations. They can advise what’s realistic for your skills and experience to date and will, in many cases, do much of the salary discussion on your behalf, dependent on individual client arrangements.

We hope you already feel better prepared to start your job search. For further advice, catch up with the rest of our January series so far…

Don’t forget to keep popping back to our News page for more tips. You can also connect with us via Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn and/or register your CV for opportunities